TaxProf Blog

Editor: Paul L. Caron
Pepperdine University School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Wednesday, November 3, 2004

OECD Releases New Data on Taxes as Percentage of GDP

The OECD has released new data on tax revenues as a percentage of gross domestic product among the 30 OECD countries. Here are the 5 highest tax countries:

Country..........Tax Revenue as % of GDP
1. Sweden.......50.8%
2. Denmark.....49.0%
3. Belgium.......45.8%
4. Finland.........44.9%
5. France..........44.2%
Here are the 5 lowest tax countries:
Country..........Tax Revenue as % of GDP
1. Mexico............19.5%
2. U.S.................25.4%
3. Korea.............25.5%
4. Switzerland...29.8%
5. Ireland...........30.0%

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2004/11/oecd_releases_n.html

Think Tank Reports | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c4eab53ef00d83456910169e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference OECD Releases New Data on Taxes as Percentage of GDP:

» Thank God For Mexico? from Centerfield
According to Taxprof, the tax burden in the United States is 2nd lowest of the 30 mostly advanced nations in OECD. Take a look at the table What does it say that we're sandwiched between Mexico and South Korea? Is... [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 7, 2004 9:48:05 PM

» Riddle me this from Preemptive Karma
TaxProf Blog has an interesting post on the new OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) data on tax revenues as a percentage of GDP (Gross Domestic Product). [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 8, 2004 10:22:11 AM

» how far we've come since PhoneCon I from f/k/a . . . .
Talk about out of the loop: I missed PhoneCon 1876 . [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 8, 2004 12:20:33 PM

» how far we've come since PhoneCon I from f/k/a . . . .
Talk about out of the loop: I missed PhoneCon 1876 . [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 8, 2004 12:20:53 PM

Comments

Paul--Do you know whether the calculations include only federal taxes or do they include taxes at all levels? Also, do they include FICA and their analogues? How are medical costs handled? (If I pay a private insurer, it is probably not considered a tax, but if part of my taxes are allocated to government-provided medical care, that is likely not the case. Query: How is the Medicare portion of FICA/SECA in this country treated?)

Posted by: Stuart Levine | Nov 3, 2004 5:42:44 PM

Paul, can you explain why "Tax Revenue as % of GDP" is such an important measure? In all sincerity, I want to understand why that figure is more important than one more relevant to me, which is the amount of money that I earn but never deposit in my bank account.

Posted by: Steven Brown | Nov 8, 2004 8:58:53 AM

The fact that these figures omit a major form of taxation, namely government-sponsored inflation, render them virtually meaningless. Government spending that dilutes the purchase power of the citizens still represents a transfer of wealth from the private to the public sector. As such, it must be included to bring any measure of integrity to this study.

Posted by: Morpheus | Nov 9, 2004 6:20:03 PM

Great info.

http://begalke.us

Posted by: J | Jan 20, 2005 10:13:05 PM