Paul L. Caron
Dean



Tuesday, September 22, 2020

California Bar Applicants Confront Pandemic, Fires, And Dubious Online Test

San Francisco Chronicle, California State Bar Exam, Delayed Amid Pandemic, Becomes Contentious:

California Bar ExamSamuel Humy graduated from Cornell Law School this year and moved to California.

With a job lined up with the Santa Clara County Public Defender Office, he planned to take the California State Bar exam over the summer and start work in early August as a full-fledged lawyer.

Then the coronavirus happened. And the fires.

The State Bar pushed the test normally scheduled in July back to September, then to October as it figured out the software and security issues around a new online format for the hours-long exam, which normally involves test takers crammed into conference rooms.

Humy and his partner, who is also taking the bar, found a place in Santa Cruz to study, but the CZU Lightning Complex fires forced them to evacuate.

“The bar is a stressful test,” without having to worry about a pandemic, fires and an untested online format, Humy said.

Plenty of other would-be lawyers around California are also unsettled. ...

Some people, including Humy, believe that California should allow law graduates to work without passing the bar, given the extraordinary circumstances of the pandemic.

Several other states have granted the privilege this year. The California State Bar said it is working on a provisional licensing program at the direction of the state Supreme Court, which would allow this year’s graduates to postpone taking the bar exam and begin practicing law under supervision.

There is no firm timeline for when that would happen, however. Public comment on a draft rule wrapped up last week, and a plan still would need to be approved by the State Bar Board of Trustees and adopted by the California Supreme Court.

The nature of the online bar exam has also raised some concerns. ... Some law school deans penned a letter asking the test be open book because of concerns about how remote proctoring will work, potential technical difficulties, and the increased stress they said a remote exam will cause.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/09/california-bar-applicants-confront-pandemic-fires-and-dubious-online-test.html

Legal Ed News, Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

German U-boat crews called them the "Happy Days," first with the British and then with the Americans as their foes did not understand how to deal with their attacks. For many who are well-settled in law the years to come with be their Happy Days as they experience the joy of facing opponents-at-law who collapse under the slightest stress and who make demands for special treatment that judges will find disgusting.

"The the coronavirus happened and the fires," they whine. Pitiful, really pitiful. As the American Council on Science and Health notes: "As shown, deaths in young people (from babies to college students) are almost non-existent. The first age group to provide a substantial contribution to the death toll is 45-54 years, who contribute nearly 5% of all coronavirus deaths. More than 80% of deaths occur in people aged 65 and over. That increases to over 92% if the 55-64 age group is included."

If those over 65 can cope with providing 80% of the deaths, can't these law students cope with being a tiny fraction of 1% of those deaths? Apparently not.

And the fires? Well, it's not like you're living in Minneapolis or Portland, when Antifa might set your apartment building on fire without warning in the middle of the night. If you lack the sense to follow the path of these wildfires and leave in time, then you shouldn't be in law anyway.

Then there is this, which these wusses apparently consider their ultimate argument: "“The bar is a stressful test,” without having to worry about a pandemic, fires and an untested online format."

That's stressful? It's a test. You can take it again. As a lawyer you'll be defending clients who, if you fail at your job. may find their lives wrecked. If you can't handle that, you need to limit you legal practices to uncontested wills.

To understand these people, you might want to watch this "Millennials in the Workplace Training Video." It is only a slight exaggeration.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sz0o9clVQu8

Posted by: Mike Perry | Sep 22, 2020 9:09:54 AM