Paul L. Caron
Dean


Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Morse & Shay: In Altera Reply Brief, Taxpayer Doubles Down On Flawed Argument That The Government Changed Its Tune

Susan C. Morse (Texas) & Stephen E. Shay (Harvard), In Altera Reply Brief, Taxpayer Doubles Down on Flawed Argument that the Government Changed Its Tune:

AlteraThe Altera reply brief doubles down on an argument that the government brief has already persuasively dispatched: that Treasury gave the impression during the rulemaking process that comparability analysis—i.e., the analysis of comparable transactions between unrelated parties—was relevant to the determination of an arm’s length result under the transfer pricing regulation at issue, and that then the government changed its tune. ...

Altera says it is making an administrative law argument, but it is really interested in a tax policy outcome. The asserted “immense prospective importance” (Reply Br. 4) is illusory. Even if the Court were to grant the petition and then hold that the 2003 amendment is procedurally defective, Treasury could simply re-promulgate the rule without substantive change but with a more detailed explanation. As for past tax years, Altera’s and similarly-situated companies’ financial statements have already incorporated the possibility that corporate income tax will be due based on compliance with the regulation. The real importance of the case for taxpayers lies in the hope that the Supreme Court goes beyond the administrative law issue and expresses a pro-taxpayer view as to the merits. But this tax issue is not presented.

Rather, the cert petition raises a procedural administrative law issue. It works for the taxpayer only if the government changed its tune. But to the contrary, the government has been singing the same tune for two decades or more.

The government did not surprise taxpayers and tax advisers with never-before-seen interpretations of the arm’s length standard. The government consistently explained that evidence of allegedly comparable transactions is not determinative of an arm’s-length result in this context. It consistently referred to the commensurate-with-income statutory language and legislative intent in support of its position. The government has been faithful to its argument and explanation since before the 2003 amendment and continuing through every stage of this litigation. There has been no surprise or change of course. Rather, this case involves the government making the same argument and explanation, over and over again.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/06/morse-shay-in-altera-reply-brief-taxpayer-doubles-down-on-flawed-argument-that-the-government-change.html

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