Paul L. Caron
Dean




Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Law School Rankings By Salary Of Graduates

What Law Grads Earn

What Law Grads Earn, Nat'l Jurist, Spr. 2020, at 16:

For the first time, the U.S. Department of Education has unveiled median salaries earned by first-year graduates [in the Class of 2016].

Here are the Top 50 law schools with the highest average salaries of their graduates:

Rank School Income
1 Columbia $180,300
2 NYU $175,800
3 Cornell $175,200
4 Penn $175,100
5 Northwestern $171,900
6 Chicago $170,500
7 Duke $162,200
8 Harvard $158,200
9 Stanford $156,700
10 Virginia $151,500
11 UC-Berkeley $135,400
12 Yale $128,900
13 Michigan $126,800
14 Vanderbilt $108,800
15 Georgetown $105,000
16 Fordham $99,000
17 UCLA $96,600
18 Texas $90,100
19 USC $89,300
20 Boston College $88,300
21 Boston University $81,200
22 Washington Univ. $79,800
23 SMU $75,600
24 Notre Dame $75,500
25 George Washington $74,300
26 UC-Irvine $68,700
27 Connecticut $68,600
28 Illinois $67,700
29 Houston $67,600
29 UC-Hastings $67,600
31 UC-Davis $67,100
32 George Mason $66,900
33 Baylor $66,800
33 Emory $66,800
35 Santa Clara $66,200
36 Brooklyn $66,100
37 Cardozo $66,000
38 St. John's $65,900
38 UNLV $65,900
40 Loyola-Chicago $64,400
41 Washington & Lee $64,200
42 Loyola-Los Angeles $63,700
43 Washington $63,000
44 Iowa $62,700
45 Georgia State $62,400
46 San Diego $62,100
47 Pepperdine $61,400
48 Temple $61,300
49 Pace $60,700
50 Texas Tech $60,200

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/04/law-school-rankings-by-salary-of-graduates.html

Law School Rankings, Legal Ed Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

1. These are starting salaries, and they don't even include end-of-year bonuses.
2. These starting salaries are perfectly consistent with the SIPP data used in the Economic Value of a Law Degree, and actually probably higher.
https://leiterlawschool.typepad.com/leiter/2015/week15/
2. Salaries go up a lot from your starting salary, say after you finish up that clerkship and move to a law firm.
3. Long term salaries are higher according to pretty much every source--AJD, Census, Tax data, DOE.

Posted by: Math | Apr 18, 2020 4:26:44 PM

Anon wrote "If you control for cost of living in the location where the majority of the graduates of these schools work (i.e. use real dollars instead of nominal dollars) you'd get a very different ranking. 60K is not a good starting salary at all in NYC, but in Texas or Iowa?"

While not a perfect metric since people can take multiple bar exams (and take them multiple times), I will note that a quick bit of investigation would reveal that nearly 20,000 people took the bar in just California, New York, and Massachusetts last summer, and there were about 34,000 law school graduates in 2019. So why do you think *most* grads are winding up in low-cost areas? And why do you suppose $60,000 is a good starting salary for anyone with seven years of higher education (and student loans) in the year 2020?

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Apr 17, 2020 10:16:12 AM

It's *fascinating,* by which I mean disgusting and enraging, how much lower the median salaries actually are than what the NALP claims, what law schools claim, and what Million Dollar Premium claimed. And by lower, I mean tens of thousands of dollars lower. Where's "Data" to scream that the tax data of virtually every law school student is wrong and the relative handful of data points in that one study he always cites is right because yelling?

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Apr 15, 2020 9:32:26 AM

If you control for cost of living in the location where the majority of the graduates of these schools work (i.e. use real dollars instead of nominal dollars) you'd get a very different ranking. 60K is not a good starting salary at all in NYC, but in Texas or Iowa?

Posted by: Anon | Apr 14, 2020 1:41:49 PM