Paul L. Caron
Dean


Thursday, March 12, 2020

Should Law Schools Do More To Develop Business-Ready Attorneys?

American Lawyer, Should Law Schools Do More to Develop Business-Ready Attorneys?:

T-ShapedWhile many law firms are bulking up their professional development offerings to better prepare associates earlier in their careers, some experts point out that it’s even more cost-effective for law schools to bear the brunt of the training.

This is the idea behind the “T-shaped lawyer,” a theory developed by Indiana University Maurer School of Law professor William Henderson. In his mind, attorneys need to not only have the deep legal expertise learned in law school (the long, vertical part of the letter T), but also professional, business and technology skills (the shorter, horizontal part of the T) to be coveted by many Am Law 200 firms.

“The T-shaped lawyer is important because they can do work that is not highly specialized, such as data processing, business operations principles—these lawyers are good at formulating solutions that deal with a client’s needs for less,” he says. “Many Am Law 200 firms want this type of attorney.”

For more on T-shaped lawyers, see:

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/03/should-law-schools-do-more-to-develop-business-ready-attorneys.html

Legal Ed News, Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

"
While many law firms are bulking up their professional development offerings to better prepare associates earlier in their careers, some experts point out that it’s even more cost-effective for law schools to bear the brunt of the training."

Ah, but this requires law schools to hire people other than HLS/YLS grads with one year of reviewing documents at BigLaw or PhD-JDs with zero minutes of practicing law, which are by far the two most common types of law prof hires.

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Mar 12, 2020 10:32:22 PM

So law schools are under the impression that every freshly minted JD they turn out is going to go into academia or BigLaw? Why wouldn't they want their graduates to know how to go into practice right away? Isn't that what the majority of those graduates try to do anyway?

Posted by: ruralcounsel | Mar 17, 2020 3:37:09 AM