Paul L. Caron
Dean



Saturday, January 4, 2020

ABA 509 Report Data: Acceptance Rates Fall (To 45%), Yields Increase (To 32%)

Following up on my previous posts on the ABA's release of the 509 reports for every law school (links below): Mike Spivey, An In-Depth Analysis of the 2019 Law School Admissions & Entering Class Data:

Thanks to increasing applicants, law schools were able to be pickier about who they admitted to their class. The average acceptance rate nationally declined to 45.1% from 46.1%, and yield increased from 29.9% to 31.6%.

115 schools saw a decline in their acceptance rate, with 35 schools showing an acceptance rate of less than 30%.

Law School Acceptance Rate
1. YALE 8.2%
2. STANFORD  9.7%
3. HARVARD 12.5%
4. PENNSYLVANIA 14.5%
5. VIRGINIA 14.7%
6. COLUMBIA 15.9%
7. MICHIGAN 16.6%
8. TEXAS 17.5%
9. USC 17.7%
10. NORTHWESTERN 18.0%
11. CHICAGO 18.6%
12. DUKE 18.9%
13. GEORGETOWN 19.5%
14. UC-BERKELEY 19.7%
15. FLORIDA 20.7%
16. GEORGIA 20.77%
17. UC-IRVINE 20.81%
18. GEORGE MASON 20.9%
19. CORNELL 21.3%
20. NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 21.6%
21. VANDERBILT 21.9%
22. UCLA 22.4%
23. BOSTON UNIVERSITY 23.1%
24. NOTRE DAME 24.1%
25. WASHINGTON UNIV. 24.8%
26. ARIZONA 26.3%
27. UNLV 27.2%
28. FORDHAM 27.3%
29. UNIV. WASHINGTON 27.8%
30. TEXAS SOUTHERN 28.2%
31. FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL 28.6%
32. TEXAS A&M 28.7%
33. GEORGIA STATE 29.3%
34. ARIZONA STATE 29.41%
35. PEPPERDINE 29.81%

The Last Gen X American, 2019: Law School Applications Fall 1 Percent, Enrollments Flat:

The median law school accepted 47.1 percent of its applicants, but that’s only down from 47.9 percent in 2018. Here’s an image of the dispersion; overall, they’re trending downward, signifying increased selectivity.

Leichter

Prior TaxProf Blog coverage:

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/01/aba-509-report-data-selectivity-and-yield.html

Legal Ed News, Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

UF achieved this by dramatically cutting the size of the entering class. This is, of course, designed to boost the ranking. Looking at the schools listed, my hunch is that the same thing was done at several of them. So, is this a good thing? Does the end -- higher rankings -- justify all means?

Posted by: JEFFREY HARRISON | Jan 4, 2020 2:23:16 PM

Look at it this way: at least the law schools don’t have to take athletes and children of alumni. So far.

Posted by: Mike Livingston | Jan 5, 2020 5:08:11 AM

What genius at USNWR decided a school with 100 admitted students with LSATs of 160 is a better school than one with 200 students with LSATs of 159? Yet law school deans follow along like sheep.

Posted by: Jeffrey harrison | Jan 5, 2020 8:21:17 PM