Paul L. Caron
Dean


Tuesday, January 7, 2020

ABA 509 Report Data: 27% Of Law Students Lost Their Conditional Scholarships

Following up on my previous posts on the ABA's release of the 509 reports for every law school (links below): Mike Spivey, An In-Depth Analysis of the 2019 Law School Admissions & Entering Class Data:

Another portion of merit aid comes in the form of conditional scholarships. Generally, these require the student perform at a certain standard other than good academic standing. There's no universal ABA regulation on this — schools are free to set the condition as high or low as they want, so long as the conditions are clearly laid out in offer letters.

Unfortunately, many students don't quite grasp the complexity of conditional offers. As we all know, law school grading is very different from what most non-STEM undergraduates are used to. The dreaded curve makes your law school grades unpredictable at best.

83 law schools reported that at least 1 member of their incoming 2018 class had conditional scholarships. Of those, 12 reported that not a single student entering with a conditional scholarship had it reduced or eliminated. 2,492 students had their scholarships reduced or eliminated, an overall rate of 27% of those who received them. Overall, 6.5% of all law students starting in 2018 had their scholarship reduced or eliminated.

At 7 universities, over 50% of those students entering with a conditional scholarship had it reduced or eliminated.

Spivey 8A

Fortunately, the national average loss rate has been going down.

Spivey 8B

Prior TaxProf Blog coverage:

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/01/aba-509-report-data-conditional-scholarships.html

Legal Ed News, Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

The bigger loss might be the foregone earnings and economic value from switching to easier classes (NOT TAX) to keep these poorly thought out scholarships.

And that on top of law schools mis-incentivizing dippy grade-goosing college majors they too often draw from :(

Posted by: Anand Desai | Jan 7, 2020 6:50:00 PM

"The bigger loss might be the foregone earnings and economic value from switching to easier classes (NOT TAX) to keep these poorly thought out scholarships. "

In my experience this is of secondary and minor concern to legal employers, coming long, long after the all-important WHERE DID YOU GO TO LAW SCHOOL?!?! A HLS grad with a spate of basket-weaving courses will be hired by a corporate firm long before a Suffolk grad with a resume overflowing with tax, commercial, and corporate courses. Actually the Suffolk grad won't be considered in the first place, so...

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Jan 8, 2020 8:47:02 AM