Paul L. Caron
Dean


Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Is Transferring To Another Law School Worth It?

Following up on my previous post, 2018 ABA Data Show Continued Decline In Number And Percentage Of Transfers:  Is Transferring Worth It?, Nat'l Jurist, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2019, at 11:

Switching schools can have its upsides, but it requires careful planning. And adapting to a new environment is not for the faint of heart. ...

Georgetown receives the highest number of transfer students in the nation, averaging between 100 and 110 each year. “That’s actually about the same size as our first-year sections, so we see a value in having that community,” Wack said. “There’s a very active transfer student association, and it is a group of students that come in sharing not the same experience that first-year cohorts might have had, but that transfer students experience.” 

Transfers

But at Georgetown, it’s a little easier than if you enter a school that takes only a handful of transfers. Many transfer students at Georgetown will take at least one class together during the fall. It’s a constitutional law class required of first-year students at Georgetown but not at many other schools.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2019/12/is-transferring-to-another-law-school-worth-it.html

Legal Ed News, Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

I wonder if transfer practices are in some large part of function of diversity strategy?

Posted by: Michael Petrik | Dec 3, 2019 7:28:28 AM

No mention that transfer students' LSAT and uGPA scores do not have to be publicly recorded, making it a nice little backdoor for these schools to mainline a lot of revenue, I mean students, with grades and scores that would not have let them get in as 1Ls. Speaking of revenue, what's the tuition discounting picture like for transfers... if any?

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Dec 3, 2019 8:48:06 AM

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