Paul L. Caron
Dean


Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Debt-To-Income Ratios Among The Top 14, 21 California, And 15 New York Law Schools

Following up on my previous post, Is Your Law School Worth It? Which Law Schools Have the Best and Worst Debt-to-Income Ratios Among Recent Graduates?

Karen Sloan (Law.com), Here's a Look at Debt-to-Earnings Ratios for Grads From Top Law Schools:

Which law schools send graduates on to the highest-paying jobs with the lowest amount of debt? New data from the U.S. Department of Education offers a comprehensive look at law graduate debt levels and first-year earnings—a new tool that can help aspiring lawyers get an idea of the costs of law school and their probable earning potential upon leaving campus.

Today, we’re looking at the so-called T-14—that is, the top 14 schools in the country as ranked by U.S. News & World Report. ... At nine of these schools, graduates on average made more right out of law school than they borrowed to finance their legal educations. (The figures don’t include any undergraduate debt.)

Karen Sloan (The Recorder),  Which California Law School Provides the Best Debt-to-Earnings Ratio for Grads? Find Out Here:

[W]e’ve got the debt-to-earnings ratios for the 21 law schools in California accredited by the American Bar Association. ... At all but one campus, graduates on average made less right out of law school than they borrowed to finance their legal educations. ... At the other 19 schools, graduates borrowed more than they made initially. That’s generally on par with legal education as a whole, where median debt exceeded first-year earnings at 94% of law schools. At seven schools in the state, median debt loads were three times or more than average starting salaries.

Karen Sloan (New York Law Journal), Which Law School in NY Provides the Best Debt-to-Earnings Ratio for Grads? Take a Look:

[W]e’ve got the debt-to-earnings ratios for the 15 law schools in New York accredited by the American Bar Association. ... At all but two campuses, graduates on average made less right out of law school than they borrowed to finance their legal educations. ... At the remaining 13, graduates borrowed more than they made initially. That’s generally on par with legal education as a whole, where median debt exceeded first-year earnings at 94% of law schools. At four schools in the state, median debt loads were two times or more than average starting salaries.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2019/12/debt-to-income-ratios-among-the-top-14-21-california-and-15-new-york-law-schools.html

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