Paul L. Caron
Dean


Monday, March 4, 2019

Law Schools Emphasize Tech Skills, But Is The Job Market Ready?

ABA Journal, Ahead of the Curve: Law Schools Emphasize Tech Skills, But Is The Job Market Ready?:

The data is similarly fuzzy when it comes to measuring the success of law school technology programs—at least when it comes to getting a job after graduating law school. The promise of these programs is twofold: Students will be prepared for a rapidly changing job market and the school will be differentiated from its many competitors. Indeed, it’s easy to find press releases and marketing materials advertising law school technology programs that prepare students for the changing practice of law. Twenty-four law schools responded to an ABA Journal inquiry about when they launched technology programs, 12 of which started programs in the past eight years. Of those 12 schools, nine were outside of U.S. News & World Report’s top 20 law schools. Some schools with post-2011 programs were located in states with more than five law schools, as well as cities with several competing law schools, where differentiation with technology offerings could help attract more students. That includes New York’s Cornell Law School, Chicago’s Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, Boston’s Suffolk University Law School and the University of California’s Hastings College of the Law.

But some recent graduates—as well as attorneys with hiring responsibilities—say that there are few tech jobs for new lawyers, largely because the profession isn’t ready for this new cadre of tech-savvy grads.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2019/03/law-schools-emphasize-tech-skills-but-is-the-job-market-ready.html

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Comments

"But some recent graduates—as well as attorneys with hiring responsibilities—say that there are few tech jobs for new lawyers, largely because the profession isn’t ready for this new cadre of tech-savvy grads.... Law schools outside the U.S. News top 20 often ask about starting legal technology programs, says Ben Kennedy, a Washington, D.C., consultant who focuses on strategic planning for colleges and universities... "

Maybe also because the job market for non-Top 20 law grads is still very precarious...

"And he [Linna] asserts that someone who can get a big-firm job paying $190,000 annually is not an “average” law student" ... “A job as a consultant at a big New York City investment bank, that’s a JD-advantage job, and it may pay more than a first-year associate job,” Currier says."

Uh, the Venn Diagram of law students locked out of Biglaw but who can land a professional role at a NY investment bank is two circles two miles apart.

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Mar 4, 2019 12:49:12 PM