Paul L. Caron
Dean


Sunday, December 30, 2018

July 2018 California Bar Exam Results

California State BarThe California State Bar has released school-by-school data on the July 2018 California Bar Exam. The July 2018 pass rate for first-time test-takers from California ABA-approved law schools was 64%, down six percentage points from last year. The pass rate fell at 20 of the 21 California ABA-approved law schools; only Pepperdine increased its pass rate (to 66%). Here are the July 2018 results for the 21 California ABA-approved law schools, along with each school's change from the July 2017 results:

Bar Pass

Rank (Rate)

 

School

Rate Change From 2017

1 (91%)

Stanford

-5%

2 (86%)

UC-Berkeley

-3%

3 (83%)

UCLA

-5%

4 (80%)

USC

-8%

5 (75%)

UC-Davis

-4%

6 (72%)

Loyola-L.A.

-1%

7 (71%)

San Diego

-7%

8 (69%)

UC-Irvine

-14%

9 (66%)

Pepperdine

+1%

64%

Statewide Ave. (CA ABA-Approved)

10 (60.3%)

Chapman

-4%

11 (59.6%)

UC-Hastings

-1%

12 (58%)

Santa Clara

-21%

13 (53%)

Southwestern

-4%

14 (52%)

Cal-Western

-13%

15 (51%)

Western State

-5%

16 (50%)

McGeorge

-12%

17 (34.0%)

La Verne

-7%

18 (33.9%)

Golden Gate

-17%

19 (33%)

San Francisco

-21%

20 (26%)

Whittier

-12%

21 (25%)

Thomas Jefferson

-5%

Prior TaxProf Blog coverage:

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2018/12/july-2018-california-bar-exam-results.html

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Comments

Depressing

Posted by: Harry Aliosa | Dec 30, 2018 1:57:44 PM

The answer to the puzzle likely lies in the composition of the 25th percentiles of the 2015 entering class. One suspects schools ranked high and low dug deep, careful only to manage their medians.

Posted by: Anon | Dec 30, 2018 2:28:52 PM

Maybe a representative of Santa Clara that posts here would like to provide context on this performance?

Posted by: JM | Dec 31, 2018 7:16:37 AM

JM, You may not understand the nature of ad hominem remarks but surely you realize that no single professor is a "representative" of his or her university. In fact, the AAUP guidelines on extramural speech make this explicit. When professors speak publicly they do so as individuals - protected by canons of academic freedom and their constitutional right to free speech - but not as "representatives" of their institutions.

Posted by: Anon | Dec 31, 2018 10:57:47 AM

JM may not understand the nature of an ad hominem attack but he should at least admit that no single professor “represents” his or her university. In fact the AAUP guidelines on extramural speech emphasize that faculty who speak publicly should be understood to not be speaking for their institution. That speech is protected by the canon of academic freedom and any applicable constitutional free speech rights but it is personal to that faculty member not representative of their home institution.

Posted by: Anon | Jan 1, 2019 6:08:15 AM