Paul L. Caron
Dean


Wednesday, October 24, 2018

NY State Bar Exam Pass Rates Plummet

Law.com, NY State Bar Exam Pass Rates Plummet:

Only 63 percent of those who took the New York State bar exam in July passed, a drop of 5 percentage points from 2017.

Those who attended ABA-accredited law schools and took the New York exam for the first time performed markedly better with an 83 percent passing rate but that was still down 3 percentage points from the previous year.

New York’s plummeting scores mirror performance on the bar examination nationwide, which sunk to a 34-year low, according to the National Conference of Bar Examiners, which released results on the Multistate Bar Examination in September.

The number of students taking the test in New York has decreased as well. The board examined 9,679 candidates, including U.S. domestic-educated candidates and foreign-educated candidates, first timers and repeat takers from July 24 to 25. That was 253 fewer candidates than last year, and the lowest number of candidates examined in a July administration since 2004.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2018/10/ny-state-bar-exam-pass-rates-plummet.html

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Comments

"New York’s plummeting scores mirror performance on the bar examination nationwide[, which in turn follow a drastic and unprecedented drop in admissions standards nationwide as law schools desperately tried to keep their revenues up during a ~40% contraction in enrollment.]

FTFY

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Oct 24, 2018 8:10:41 AM

This shows the consequences of lowering the admission standards at low schools everywhere. Wait until the SCOTUS tightens up on Constitutional Law applications.

Posted by: Sylvester Brock | Oct 24, 2018 9:40:56 AM

This shows the consequences of lowering the admission standards at low schools everywhere. Wait until the SCOTUS tightens up on Constitutional Law applications.

Posted by: Sylvester Brock | Oct 24, 2018 9:41:02 AM

What was the diversity pass rate? Women vs men e.g. or by race? Does the Bar keep track in those ways? If not, why not? They track everything else that way.

Posted by: jim sweeney | Oct 24, 2018 10:19:00 AM

Judith A. Gundersen succeeded Erica Moeser as president and CEO of president of the NCBE. Very interesting both of them went to law school in Wisconsin. Now something very interesting about Wisconsin is that you don't need to pass any bar exam to be admitted in as an attorney. There exists a "diploma" privilege for those who can be certified by either Marquette U. School of Law or U. of Wisc School of Law. So my question is did Ms. Gunderson or her predecessor ever pass the MBE? I sure hope so.

https://www.wicourts.gov/services/attorney/bar.htm
http://www.ncbex.org/news/judith-gundersen-ncbe-president-ceo/

Posted by: Anthony E. Parent, Esq | Oct 24, 2018 10:54:32 AM

The plummet in bar passage rates has no correlation with the modest decline in admission standards. Schools have been more selective in recent years and the rates are still plummeting. Bar passage rates have plummeted because schools modified their curriculum to create so called practice ready graduates. Law school no longer emphasizes core classroom training that develops the ability to think like a lawyer. Schools are no longer hiring top legal talent with Federal clerkship experience who understand the persuasive arguments judges look for. The schools now want less qualified JD-PhDs to teach core classes. And then the students spend their subsequent years performing mundane legal tasks in a “practice setting” without learning how to solve a legal problem. No wonder bar exam rates have plummeted.

Posted by: Practice Ready | Oct 24, 2018 7:30:01 PM

"The plummet in bar passage rates has no correlation with the modest decline in admission standards. "

I'm sure if I got research grants from LSAC I'd be whistling the same tune. Fortunately I don't so I get to deal with objective reality.

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Oct 24, 2018 10:28:30 PM

"Schools are no longer hiring top legal talent with Federal clerkship experience who understand the persuasive arguments judges look for. The schools now want less qualified JD-PhDs to teach core classes. "

Yes, I understand that law professors with actual graduate training in economics and other social sciences endanger those with lesser talents in those fields who nevertheless try to pass themselves off as experts. But here in reality, a JD + a PhD is not "less qualified" than just a JD.

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Oct 24, 2018 10:30:31 PM