TaxProf Blog

Editor: Paul L. Caron, Dean
Pepperdine University School of Law

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Law Schools Increasingly Scrutinize Applicants' Social Media Posts In Admissions Decisions

Facebook Twitter InstagramLaw.com, Law Schools Scrutinizing Applicants' Social Media Posts:

If you want to get into law school, better not post that video of your underage self shot-gunning a beer to your Facebook page. And while you’re at it, leave your obsession with actual shot guns off your Twitter account.

It turns out that more than half of law school admissions officials recently surveyed by Kaplan Test Prep—56 percent—said they have looked at the applicants’ social media to get a better sense of them. And fully 91 percent said that social media is fair game when culling through applications. ...

Law admissions offices have more heavily relied on social media reviews in recent years. Just 37 percent said they looked at social media pages in 2011, when Kaplan first asked the question.
Of those who check social media pages, 66 percent told Kaplan that they had found something that hurt a candidate’s chances, such as inappropriate photos of underage drinking or other undesirable activities. Some officials reported seeing racist things on social media, or even criminal activity.

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Comments

Do you think they are checking TaxProf posts as well.

Posted by: Mike Livingston | Oct 10, 2018 4:38:04 AM

Sure. Applicants are still in a very deep trough thanks to word that so many lawyers end up, well, like me, the median law school acceptance rate is about 55%, and most schools are still desperate to not have their GPAs and LSATs fall any further. While maybe Yale has the luxury of wading through applicants' Instagram feeds (and probably should, given recent events), very few institutions are in that position.

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Oct 10, 2018 7:57:46 AM

Now if only the faculty and administrators would make theirs public before scrubbing their social accounts, everyone could benefit from transparency.

What this will really do is act as a filter; eliminate people too stupid and too impulsive to restrict what they post, and reward those sneaky or disciplined enough not to post stupid things.

Posted by: ruralcounsel | Oct 10, 2018 9:55:46 AM

Quote: And while you’re at it, leave your obsession with actual shot guns off your Twitter account.

Yeah, we can't have any hunters getting into law school. They might actually believe in the Second Amendment.

Posted by: Michael W. Perry | Oct 10, 2018 5:29:04 PM