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Editor: Paul L. Caron, Dean
Pepperdine University School of Law

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Race, Cognitive Biases, And The Power Of Law Student Teaching Evaluations

Gregory S. Parks (Wake Forest), Race, Cognitive Biases, and the Power of Law Student Teaching Evaluations, 51  U.C. Davis L. Rev. 1039 (2018):

Decades of research shows that students' professor evaluations are influenced by factors well-beyond how knowledgeable the professor was or how effectively they taught. Among those factors is race. While some students' evaluative judgments of professors of color may be motivated by express racial animus, it is doubtful that such is the dominant narrative. Rather, what likely takes place are systematic deviations from rational judgment, whereby inferences about other people and situations are illogically drawn. In short, students' cognitive biases skew how they evaluate professors of color. In this Article, I explore how cognitive biases among law students influence how they perceive and evaluate law faculty of color.

In addition, I contend that a handful of automatic associations and attitudes about faculty of color predict how law students evaluate them. Moreover, senior, especially white, colleagues often resist considering the role of race in law students' evaluations because of their own inability to be mindful of their own cognitive biases. Lastly, given research largely from social and cognitive psychology, I suggest a handful of interventions for law faculty of color to better navigate classroom dynamics.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2018/03/race-cognitive-biases-and-the-power-of-law-student-teaching-evaluations.html

Legal Education, Scholarship | Permalink

Comments

This is pathetic.


"Decades of research shows that students' professor evaluations are influenced by factors well-beyond how knowledgeable the professor was or how effectively they taught."


I suppose. Prettier people tend to get ahead more than they should in this world. See Hope Hicks.


"Among those factors is race."


And there it is. Raciss wypipo. You know how you can convince me, instead of this coming off as some social justice warrior "muh racism" idiocy? Have the exact same law professor present himself as a white law professor, a black law professor, a Native American law professor, an Asian law professor, and so on, like Key & Peele, using costumes and make-up and prosthetics, and have different students at the same law school evaluate the same law professor. If the same law professor, giving the same class, but differing only by skin color, is rated lower the darker his skin gets, you will totally convince me. But you will not run this little experiment for obvious reasons: you will not like the results.


While some students' evaluative judgments of professors of color may be motivated by express racial animus, it is doubtful that such is the dominant narrative.


Some? Sounds like 10%? Pray tell, how many millennial law students have racial animus? Tell us. It is going to break their little bitty hearts.


Rather, what likely takes place are systematic deviations from rational judgment, whereby inferences about other people and situations are illogically drawn.


What is this garbage? Racist wypipo are racist but not because they are racist, but because they make illogical inferences? Those racists! Wut?


In short, students' cognitive biases skew how they evaluate professors of color.

What does this even mean? No, I am not wasting my time reading the article.


In this Article, I explore how cognitive biases among law students influence how they perceive and evaluate law faculty of color.


Same as previous.


In addition, I contend that a handful of automatic associations and attitudes about faculty of color predict how law students evaluate them.


Sooooo glad to hear the faculty is racist, too. Ha! Somebody better get tenure or there is going to be trouble!


Moreover, senior, especially white, colleagues often resist considering the role of race in law students' evaluations because of their own inability to be mindful of their own cognitive biases.


White law professors are not #woke enough. No matter how much they try. It is like an identity property in mathematics. It is genius: heads I win, tails you lose.


Lastly, given research largely from social and cognitive psychology, I suggest a handful of interventions for law faculty of color to better navigate classroom dynamics.


Ca-ching! Show me the moooooonnnnneeeeeyyyyyy! Honestly, I'd call law students and law professors racist all day long if I could make a buck. The added bonus would be the irony of getting paid to fix something that is not broken.

Posted by: #WokeLawProf | Mar 7, 2018 6:40:06 PM