Paul L. Caron
Dean


Thursday, December 8, 2016

Graduate Sues University For $1.2 Million, Says 'Appallingly Bad' Teaching Prevented Him From Being A Successful Lawyer

Oxford (2016)American Lawyer, Graduate Sues Oxford University For Preventing Him From Becoming A Lawyer:

An Oxford graduate is suing the prestigious university for 1 million pounds ($1.27 million), claiming that its “appallingly bad” teaching prevented him from having a successful career as a lawyer.

Faiz Siddiqui, who graduated with a degree in modern history 16 years ago, told the high court he believes he would have had a career as an international commercial lawyer if he had been awarded a first-class degree, rather than the upper second-class he actually achieved. (Instead of using a GPA system, U.K. degrees are graded in four categories: first class, upper second class, lower second class and third class.)

Siddiqui, who trained as a solicitor after leaving university, claims that he underachieved due to “negligent” teaching.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2016/12/graduate-sues-university-for-12-million-says-appallingly-bad-teaching-prevented-him-from-being-a-suc.html

Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

Notice how the media is mocking this fellow, but took law graduates suing their law schools on similarly unconventional theories seriously.

Posted by: Notice | Dec 8, 2016 1:34:43 PM

I cannot believe that this has not been dismissed on "the pleadings." When will personal responsibility reassert itself?

Posted by: Tom N. | Dec 8, 2016 1:36:10 PM

This whole personal responsibility thing is passe, Tom. Get with the program.

Posted by: Mike Petrik | Dec 8, 2016 6:54:13 PM

If he wins the suit, doesn't it disprove his case?

Posted by: TGunther | Dec 8, 2016 8:45:01 PM

Poor guy, he thought he'd learn something at a university? You go to a university not for what you'll learn, you go there for the degree/credential. That's why if you really want to get ahead in law or any number of profession, you go to an ivy-league university. They are the gold standard in credentialism, any actual learning while there is secondary at best (probably 'networking' is foremost).

Posted by: TBlakely | Dec 8, 2016 9:13:26 PM

Now this is a convincing law suit.

Posted by: mike livingston | Dec 9, 2016 4:04:53 AM

Negligent teaching or negligent learning?

Posted by: ruralcounsel | Dec 9, 2016 4:27:45 AM