Paul L. Caron
Dean




Saturday, August 27, 2016

Colorado Law School Enjoys All-Time High

Colorado Logo (2016)Colorado Law School press release:

With 170 individuals, the University of Colorado Law School’s incoming class of 2019 is the most selective and academically competitive in the school’s history. The 2016-17 admissions cycle set the school’s record for number of applications and highest median GPA of an incoming class.

This year, Colorado Law [#40 in U.S. News] received 3,299 applications for the class of 2019—a 38 percent increase from last year and the greatest number of applications ever received in an admissions cycle. The larger applicant pool allowed for more selectivity, which boosted the median GPA to the highest in the school’s history (3.69). The median LSAT score (162) for the class of 2019 is also higher than that of previous classes.

Here is Colorado's admission data for the prior six years from Law School Transparency:

LST

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2016/08/colorado-law-school-enjoys-all-time-high.html

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Comments

Seems like quite a few schools are taking a play out of Chemerinsky's playbook and throwing the admissions hail Mary pass this year to capitalize on the ranking opportunity. Anything that reduces the ultimate number of new lawyers coming into the market is a good thing, though.

Posted by: Anon | Aug 27, 2016 12:18:13 PM

I think the Title to the post gives away why the numbers increased. Pot is legal in Colorado for recreational use. https://www.coloradopotguide.com/marijuana-laws-in-colorado/

Posted by: Ralph Brill | Aug 27, 2016 7:07:58 AM

25 percent LSAT fell to 156. Lowering their standards on the bottom end can lead to bar passage problems a few years from now.

Posted by: bIeber | Aug 27, 2016 3:56:18 AM

I find it entertaining how middle tier law schools try to turn their shrinking size, and continued mediocrity, into an advantage by saying how "selective" they are. Perhaps at one point they will teach a single student each semester, who of course will receive a full scholarship to attend. They would then be more "selective" than ever I suppose.

Posted by: mike livingston | Aug 27, 2016 3:37:30 AM