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Editor: Paul L. Caron, Dean
Pepperdine University School of Law

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Harper: NY Times Has 'Pulled A Loose Thread On The Legal Education Establishment’s Sweater'

NY Times Logo (2015)Steven J. Harper (Adjunct Professor, Northwestern; author, The Lawyer Bubble), Game-Changer?:

Almost overnight, a persistently sad situation finally has many legal educators squirming. And rightly so.

The problem has been years in the making, as has been the profession’s unwillingness to address it. Federal funding mechanisms have combined with lack of accountability and non-dischargeability in bankruptcy to block the effective operation of market forces in legal education. Well-intentioned policies have gone terribly awry; they actually encourage misbehavior among many law school deans.

As law student debt soared into six-figures, calls for change produced the equivalent of catcalls from the “voice of the profession” — the ABA. Its latest Task Force report on the subject should embarrass anyone associated with it, including the House of Delegates that approved it. As the profession’s echo chamber convinced itself that all was well, hope for meaningful change was leaving the building.

But as it did four years ago, The New York Times has now aimed its spotlight on one of the profession’s dirtiest secrets.

The Paper of Record Speaks

In January 2011, The New York Times’ David Segal wrote a series that exposed the cynical gamesmanship whereby law schools inflated their recent graduates’ employment statistics. Through the deepening Great Recession, the profession still generated 90-plus percent employment rates for recent graduates. How? By counting every short-term, part-time, and non-JD-related job as if it were a position that any law graduate would want. Part-time greeters at Wal-mart, temporary baristas at Starbucks, and associates at Cravath were all the same in the eyes of that metric: employed.

The ugly truth surprised many prospective law students, but not the ABA, which had approved the schools’ misleading reporting methods. It turned out that within nine months of graduation, only about half of all new J.D.-degree holders were obtaining full-time long-term (defined as lasting a year) jobs that required bar passage. Within two years of the Times’ expose’, the ABA succumbed to public embarrassment and required law schools to detail their employment outcomes.

And It Speaks Again ...

The overall full-time long-term JD-required employment rate has barely budged since the new age of transparency began, but law school tuition and resulting student debt have outpaced inflation. As applications to law school plummeted, many deans responded by increasing acceptance rates to keep student loan revenues flowing.

So now the focus has shifted from full disclosure to flawed funding, and the Times has entered the field of battle. ...

And Still the Naysayers Resist ...

The latest Times’ editorial is generating similarly defensive vitriol from some law professors and deans who are determined to defend the indefensible. ....

How About a Constructive Suggestion?

Policymakers could revise the federal loan program to tie student funding at a school to that school’s employment outcomes for recent graduates. In fact, it could do that while preserving deferral and IBR programs. Add dischargeability of educational debt in bankruptcy and you have the beginnings of a holistic recipe for hope.

In that respect, Professor Henderson notes: “I have faith that my legal colleagues would do a masterful job solving the problems of higher education.”

Based on the profession’s track record to date, I fear that my friend’s sentiment reflects a triumph of hope over reality. But his key message is right on target: If the profession does not put its own house in order soon, someone else will.

Marginal law schools exploiting market dysfunction may have triggered the current round of scrutiny, but outside interveners will not limit their systemic fixes to the bottom feeders. Deniers of the ongoing crisis can persist in their positions, or they can propose solutions, as I have.

The Times has pulled a loose thread on the entire legal education establishment’s sweater.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2015/10/harper-ny-times-has-pulled-a-loose-thread-on-the-legal-education-establishments-sweater.html

Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

Harper is right. Just some points of agreement.

David Barnhizer. "Redesigning the American Law School" Michigan State Law Review 2010 (2010)-249.
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/david_barnhizer/5


David Barnhizer. 2014. "Law School Enrollments and Adaptive Strategies" The SelectedWorks of David Barnhizer
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/david_barnhizer/92

David Barnhizer. 2014. "Self-Interest and Sinecure: Why Law School can’t be “Fixed” from within" The SelectedWorks of David Barnhizer
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/david_barnhizer/88

David Barnhizer. 2014. "Survival Strategies for "Ordinary" Law Schools" The SelectedWorks of David Barnhizer
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/david_barnhizer/89


Posted by: David | Oct 28, 2015 2:07:39 PM