Paul L. Caron
Dean





Wednesday, December 15, 2010

2011 Princeton Review Law School Rankings: Best (and Worst) Career Preparation

Princeton Review (2011) I previously blogged the lists of the Top 10 law schools in eleven categories posted on Princeton Review's web site in connection with its publication of the 2011 edition of Best 172 Law Schools (with the University of Cincinnati College of Law again on the cover).  The rankings are the result of Princeton Review's survey of 18,000 students at the 172 law schools, along with school statistics provided by administrators.

I have extracted from the individual profiles of the 172 law schools all of the available data to rank the schools in six categories. I will report each day on one of the ranking categories.

Career Rating: How well the law school prepares its students for a successful career in law, on a scale of 60 to 99. The rating incorporates school-reported data and the average responses of law students at the school to a few questions on our law student survey. We ask law schools for the average starting salaries of graduating students, the percentage of graduating students who find employment after graduation, and the percentage of students who pass the bar exam the first time they take it. We ask students about how much the law program encourages practical experience; the opportunities for externships, internships, and clerkships; and how prepared to practice law they feel after graduating.

Here are the law schools with the highest and lowest career ratings (an asterisk indicates that the school's administrators did not supply the Princeton Review with the requested statistical information):

 

School

Score

 

School

Score

1

Northwestern

99

148

Campbell

70

 

NYU

99

149

Oklahoma City

69

 

Pennsylvania

99

 

Oregon

69

4

Chicago

98

151

Akron

68

 

Harvard

98

 

Hamline

68

 

Vanderbilt

98

 

Southern Illinois

68

7

Boston College

97

 

UCLA

68

 

Michigan 

97

155

South Carolina

67

 

Virginia

97

 

St. Thomas (Miami)

67

10

Boston University

96

 

Valparaiso

67

 

Notre Dame

96

 

West Virginia

67

 

Texas

96

159

Arkansas-Fay.

66

13

Geo. Washington

95

 

Touro

66

 

Stanford

95

 

Washburn

66

 

Wake Forest

95

162

Missouri-Columbia

65

16

Georgetown

94

163

Ohio Northern

64

 

USC

94

 

Rutgers-Newark

64

 

UC-Davis

94

165

Arkansas-Little Rock

63

19

Columbia

93

 

South Dakota

63

 

Fordham

93

167

Idaho

62

 

UC-Berkeley

93

168

Appalachian

61

22

Alabama

92

 

Thomas Cooley

61

 

Yale

92

170

Phoenix*

60

24

Cornell

91

 

Southern*

60

 

Duke

91

 

Washington U.*

60

 

UC-Hastings

91

 

 

 

Unfortunately, the Princeton Review did not release the response rate per school, so it is impossible to determine how the rankings are affected by each school's representation among the respondents.

For prior years' rankings, see:

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2010/12/2010-princeton-1.html

Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c4eab53ef0147e0b6708b970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference 2011 Princeton Review Law School Rankings: Best (and Worst) Career Preparation:

Comments

The Princeton Review "ratings" sound like the bond ratings agencies gave stacks of securitized mortgages. There's (a) a nice, shiny, overall number, (2) a credible sounding the claim that said overall number is based on a consideration of important metrics, and (3) a very good reason to believe that the underlying metrics are either complete fiction or based on wishful thinking.

To channel Jerry Maguire - "SHOW ME THE NUMBERS!"

Seriously, what are students supposed to infer from the fact that Duke and UC Hastings both have a career rating of "91?"

Also, does anyone realize this...

"We ask students about how much the law program encourages practical experience; the opportunities for externships, internships, and clerkships; and how prepared to practice law they feel after graduating."

... is a marketing metric? All its measuring is whether a school manages students' feelings. I am not sure why anyone should care that the career staff does a good job of making students feel good. Do they get them jobs? I hear there's data for that.

Posted by: Nolo Contendre | Dec 15, 2010 8:05:22 AM