Paul L. Caron
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Friday, April 21, 2006

Most-Cited and Most-Downloaded Minority Law Faculty

Paul Butler has published a list of the Most-Cited Minority Law Faculty from the Top 30+ Law Schools, derived from Brian Leiter's Faculty Quality Based on Scholarly Impact, 2005 Ranking.  The listing consists of the 43 minority law professors whose citation counts place them in the Top 25% of the faculty at these schools.

In our paper, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006), Bernie Black and I discuss citation count rankings of law faculties (at pages 92-95), and then compare those rankings (as well as rankings of law faculties by reputation and publications) with the SSRN rankings (at pages 97-102, 107-20).  Although our article focused on rankings of law faculties, we plan in future work to take on the question of rankings of individual law faculty (we briefly discuss individual faculty rankings in our respective corporate and tax law areas at pages 120-22).

Here are the SSRN rankings and measures for total downloads (as of April 1, 2006) of the most-cited minority law faculty from the Butler-Leiter list:

Faculty

Rank

Measure

Mitu Gulati (Georgetown)

44

7039

John Yoo (UC-Berkeley)

61

5870

Keith Hylton (Boston University)

76

5081

Bruce Kobayashi (George Mason)

112

3849

Neal Katyal (Georgetown)

219

1985

Saikrishna Prakash (San Diego)

293

1451

Jim Chen (Minnesota)

427

988

Daniel Rodriguez (San Diego)

447

947

Gabriel Chin (Arizona)

735

511

Adrienne Davis (North Carolina)

1108

289

Lan Cao (William & Mary)

1338

209

Sheila Foster (Fordham)

1769

118

Hiroshi Motomura (North Carolina)

2398

49

Alex Johnson (Minnesota)

2752

24

Only 14 of the 43 most-cited minority law professors are included in the SSRN rankings.  This ranking excludes minority faculty not on the Butler-Leiter list (e.g., Stephen Choi (NYU), who ranks #32 with 10066 downloads; Tim Wu (Columbia), #49 with 6844 downloads; and my colleague Rafael Gely (Cincinnati), #180 with 2492 downloads).  In our Indiana article, we discuss (at pages 116-17) the racial (and gender) implication of prior faculty ranking studies as well as the under-representation of minorities (and women) in the SSRN rankings.

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2006/04/mostcited_and_d.html

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Comments

Isn't SSRN a bit unreliable as a ranking matrix in that (i) many schools haven't signed up for it, (ii) many downloads occur based on reputation, i.e., before the person downloading has even seen the relevant article? Granted, all measuring rods are imperfect, but this one seems unusually so.

Posted by: Michael A. Livingston | Apr 22, 2006 7:07:32 AM