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Editor: Paul L. Caron
Pepperdine University School of Law

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Saturday, November 18, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Jonathan Barry Forman (Oklahoma)

        • B.S. 1973, Northwestern
        • M,A. (Psychology) 1975, Iowa
        • J.D. 1978, Michigan
        • M,A. (Economics) 1983, George Washington

      

Forman2 Although I’m from Cleveland, I was always a westerner at heart, and now I get to live where the buffalo roam. In college, I studied psychology, thought about economic justice, and went to lots of antiwar demonstrations. I almost went to law school next, but the first time I went to a law library, I fell asleep. So, instead, I went to graduate school in physiological psychology – yep, running rats. Soon, however, I got interested in the rights of mental patients, and I went to law school to become a civil rights lawyer.

Thanks to Professor L. Hart Wright, I fell in love with tax law. I also took my first economics class in law school, and I still remember when Professor Peter Steiner nicknamed me “Robin Hood” because I wanted to take from the rich and give to the poor.

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November 18, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, November 11, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

   

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Over the past twelve weeks, we have profiled the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.  Here is the full listing, in case you missed any of the profiles.    Next week, we will resume our regular spotlight series on individual Tax Profs.

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November 11, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, November 4, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

   

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.  We conclude the series with profiles of Florida's two visiting tax faculty.

GuttingKristin Balding Gutting earned her B.S. (Accounting, 1997) from Valparaiso, J.D. (2000) from Saint Louis, and Tax LL.M. (2000) from Florida:

A tax lawyer was not the career I envisioned growing up. I always thought that I would be a FBI agent or some type of advertising executive. When I started college at Valparaiso University, I decided to major in marketing. I soon realized that marketing would require me to participate in several group projects a semester. Unfortunately, this was not something to which I would be able to give 100 percent, because I was on a softball scholarship and traveled throughout the Spring semester. I thought it would be unfair for me to receive a grade as a group that I was unable to attend a majority of the group meetings. So, instead, I decided that I would follow my other career path and major in accounting (a very common major for FBI agents). Throughout my undergraduate studies, I found myself really enjoying my tax classes. However, when I went to law school, I still had the idea of being an FBI agent.

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November 4, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, October 28, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

   

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.  We conclude the series with profiles of Florida's two visiting tax faculty.

Polsky_1_1 Gregg Polsky is visiting Florida this year from Minnesota:

I grew up in South Florida playing tennis—a lot of tennis. I’d estimate about 300 days a year between the ages of 10 and 22. Although I became pretty good at the game, playing competitive junior tennis in South Florida is quite a humbling experience. When I was a senior in high school, the player that was then the #1 ranked junior tennis player in the world was seeded third in the district tournament! My modest claim to tennis fame occurred when my doubles partner and I won the Florida state high school doubles championship (prior winners include Jim Courier) in my senior year. I attribute this accomplishment mainly (exclusively?) to my luck in having a truly gifted doubles partner (Brian Stanton), who later became an NCAA All-American at FSU. My decision about where to attend college was driven mainly by tennis. When my college career was over, I stopped playing tennis completely and swore that I’d never pick up a racket again.

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October 28, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, October 21, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

   

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

Willis_2 A native of Acadiana, Steven J. Willis joined the Florida faculty in 1981, having taught previously at NYU. He earned his B.A. (1974) and J.D. (1977) from LSU, and his tax LL.M. (1979) from NYU.

Steven teaches tax courses in both the J.D. program and the Graduate Tax Program. He is married to Vickey Broussard, with whom he has one son, Scott Willis, and one daughter, Annie Willis.

His recent publications include:

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October 21, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, October 14, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

 

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

RichardsonDavid M. Richardson's freshman year of college was spent at the University of Virginia where I became interested in Physics. That interest, bolstered somewhat by the fact that my high school sweetheart, Regina, was at Smith College, resulted in my transfer to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. After graduating in 1961, I headed to the University of Florida for a graduate degree in Physics. On the way, Regina, who had also just graduated, and I got married by a Justice of the Peace in Georgia.

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October 14, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, October 7, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

 

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

Mcmahon_6Martin J. McMahon, Jr. is the Clarence J. TeSelle Professor of Law at the University of Florida, where he teaches in the Graduate Tax Program, although neither he nor anyone else is quite sure how he ended up there. He is a 1971 graduate of Rutgers College, where he majored in narcolepsy and minored in economics, in which his principal focus was socialist and communist economic systems. Since his senior thesis — researched in part in Russian-language Soviet economic journals, which was difficult since Marty didn’t read Russian all that well — predicted, based on the Soviet economic journal articles, that the Soviet centrally planned economic system would eventually give way to a more market-oriented system, he didn’t see any future as a communist economist. (Nevertheless, some people, particularly Ira Shepard, continue to this day to call him a “commie” after reading his various articles on progressive taxation.) So Marty started looking for something else to do.

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October 7, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, September 30, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

 

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

Mcdaniel_2Paul R. McDaniel is the James J. Freeland Eminent Scholar in Taxation and Professor of Law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. He is entering his fortieth year as a full-time tax professor, tax practitioner, and government tax official.

It wasn’t supposed to turn out this way. After graduating from Harvard in 1961 (a member of what came to be known as the “tax class”), Paul returned to his home in Oklahoma City and joined the Crowe, Dunleavy firm. He was firmly on a track designed to make him a tough litigator. However, after a few extremely difficult and unpleasant trials, he decided that tax law offered the prospect of a less stressful and more interesting way to practice law.

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September 30, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, September 23, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

 

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

LokkenLawrence Lokken is the Hugh Culverhouse Eminent Scholar in Taxation at Florida:

Somebody once told me that Erwin Griswold, responding to the question, “What is the best undergraduate major for a student intending on going to law school?,” said that he thought mathematics and music were the best backgrounds for law students. His reasons for this belief are lost to me, but I found it very interesting because my undergraduate majors were music and mathematics. Over the years, I have come to the conclusion that the path that took me from music and mathematics to tax law is direct and not very long.

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September 23, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, September 16, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

 

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

Hudson_1David M. Hudson was born in 1946.  He received his B.S. degree in 1968 from Wake Forest University, J.D. degree in 1974 from Florida State University, an LL.M. (Taxation) in 1975 from the University of Florida, and an LL.M. in 1980 from the University of London. He picks up the story:

I am presently serving as Editor of the Florida Tax Review. I was admitted to the Florida Bar in 1974. I served as an Assistant Attorney General (Taxation) with the Florida Department of Legal Affairs from 1974 - 76; Visiting Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Florida from 1976 - 77; Assistant Professor of Law at Duquesne, 1977 - 78; Deputy General Counsel, Florida Department of Business Regulation, 1978 - 79; Adjunct Professor of Law at Florida State, 1979. At the University of Florida Levin College of Law I was an Assistant Professor of Law from 1980 - 83, an Associate Professor of Law from 1983 - 85 and I have been a Professor of Law since 1985.

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September 16, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, September 9, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

 

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

Friel_2With Aruba as my birthplace, I suppose I had an early sign I'd end up doing tax law, but it took me a good while to figure that out. I enjoyed the one tax class I took in law school, but what I really wanted to do when those three years were up was to see what was west of the Mississippi and work with the then new Vista Volunteer program. And I had some great experiences, working primarily with migrant farmworkers in Oregon. This was during the heyday of Cesar Chavez' movement in California no labor organizing, we couldn't do that and wouldn't have been good at it anyway but those were interesting times for farmworkers. A few more years in Legal Services followed, doing a range of individual casework and participating in some impact litigation. Tax was barely a dot on the horizon at this point.

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September 9, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, September 2, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

 

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

Dilley_5Patricia E. Dilley was a late comer to the Tax Prof world, having pursued careers in history teaching and then in government before even going to law school. She has made up for lost time and established herself as an important tax academic, producing major scholarly work in the social security and pension areas while teaching in one of America's leading graduate tax programs.

Pat was raised in Tennessee, but her education is largely Pennsylvanian -- Swarthmore College (B.A. 1973), and then the University of Pennsylvania (M.A., History 1976). She left the Ph.D. program at Penn when it became clear there were no jobs teaching history anywhere in the continental US, and entered government service, in the legislative policy office of the Social Security Administration.

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September 2, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 26, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

 

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

Calfee_2 Dennis A. Calfee grew up in a small town in southeastern Washington State, Connell, where his father was the town’s sole pharmacist and sole Republican.  He picks up the story:

My interest in tax was first perked by Professor Daniel Brajcich and advanced by Professor Gary Randall at Gonzaga University. Both of these professors were superb classroom teachers and exemplary individuals both personally and professionally who had a positive influence on countless students, including yours truly. After a clerkship on the Washington State Court of Appeals and some time with Uncle Sam I decided to get a graduate degree in taxation. While working for the Old National Bank in their trust department during law school I relied heavily on two books: Federal Income Taxation of Estates and Beneficiaries, which had three co-authors two of whom were Professors at Florida:  Richard B. Stephens and James J. Freeland; and Federal Estate and Gift Taxation, which had three co-authors, two of whom again were Florida professors: Richard B. Stephens and Steven A. Lind.

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August 26, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 19, 2006

Spotlight_1_1

For over 30 years, the University of Florida Graduate Tax Program has been one of the nation's leading programs for the advanced study of tax law. Among the country's 30 graduate tax programs, Florida has by far the largest number of full-time faculty and is the only school to offer three advanced tax degrees:

Florida_2_1

Graduate tax students assist in the publication of the Florida Tax Review, one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed tax journals in the country.  In this 12-part series, TaxProf Blog will profile the Florida Graduate Tax Faculty.

BraunerYariv Brauner joins the University of Florida this fall. He will teach primarily in Florida’s International Tax Graduate Tax Programs together with Professors Paul McDaniel and Larry Lokken. He came to the United States in 1997 to take the NYU LL.M. in International Taxation and enjoy New York City’s East Village.

Originally from Israel, Yariv grew up in the Galilee, spent a long time in the Israeli Defense Forces and went to law school at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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August 19, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 12, 2006

Spotlight_1_1F. Philip Manns, Jr. (Liberty)

        • B.S. 1982, Virginia
        • J.D. 1987, Maryland

    

   

Manns_1

I became a tax lawyer, because that’s the field engineers chose when they went to law school in 1984. Now engineers in law school choose patent law, but that field was not rescued from its moribund state until the early 1990s when the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit invigorated patent law (and not coincidentally intellectual property became the mainstay of the U.S. economy).

I graduated from college with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering, and as I worked for two years as an engineer, I noticed that the really interesting issues always were referred to lawyers. Engineers are a collegial bunch, working in teams to solve problems, with very little individual credit or blame. However, because we had contracts with suppliers, blame became relevant when problems arose. At that point, the engineers scattered, uninterested in nontechnical questions like fault, but I remained interested in them.

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August 12, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 5, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Christopher M. Pietruszkiewicz (LSU)

        • B.S. 1989, University of Scranton
        • J.D. 1992, Loyola
        • LL.M. (Tax) 1997, Georgetown

   

 

Chris_photo I grew up in a small town in Northeastern Pennsylvania and, when I go back to visit, I can still sit on the front porch and wave to every second or third car that passes the house. Unfortunately for me, I was born with an abacus, so career choices were very limited – accounting or, well, accounting. Not surprisingly, my degree is in accounting and I even earned a varsity letter in college -- ok, technically I played golf in college.

After law school, I moved to Washington, D.C. and worked as an Attorney Advisor for the U.S. Department of Education for five years, writing legal opinions and working on Department-wide initiatives such as creating an agency-wide ADR program and trying to figure out how to operate the Department with a proposed 50% budget reduction.

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August 5, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 29, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Neil H. Buchanan (Rutgers-Newark)

        • A.B. 1981, Vassar
        • A.M. (Economics) 1991, Harvard
        • Ph.D. (Economics) 1996, Harvard
        • J.D. 2002, Michigan

 

Buchanan_3[Update: Professor Buchanan took a position as Associate Professor at the George Washington University Law School, effective January 1, 2007.]

My father was a Presbyterian minister, but I grew up on a steady diet of "Perry Mason" and knew when I was twelve that I wanted to be a lawyer. That was still the plan until my sophomore year at Vassar, when my heart was stolen by a macroeconomic theory class. I loved the math, the policy implications, the sense of dealing with something Very Important. After graduating, I immediately enrolled in the Ph.D. program in economics at Harvard. There, my interests turned toward teaching. I became one of those people who extends his graduate school career because he's having so much fun teaching undergraduate classes. I taught the intro class, seminars, summer school, etc. I even managed to land a teaching position at Berkeley one summer (despite having no prior connections there), which introduced me to the joys of the Bay Area. The next obvious step was to find a teaching position at a liberal arts college. After a one-year visiting stint at Wellesley College, I landed a tenure-track job at Goucher College, near Baltimore.

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July 29, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 22, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Frank J. Doti (Chapman)

        • B.S. 1966, Illinois
        • J.D. 1969, Chicago-Kent
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Doti Professor Doti is the William P. Foley II Chair in Corporate Law and Taxation, professor of law, and Director of the J.D. Tax Law Emphasis. He has over 35 years of tax law experience, first as an associate attorney with McDermott, Will & Emery, the largest tax law firm in the nation. Next he was vice president and director of taxes for the multinational Leo Burnett advertising agency. He has taught tax law for a quarter century and developed the first U.S. Tax Court clinical education program west of Denver, Colorado. Professor Doti founded and directs Chapman’s J.D. Tax Law Emphasis program.

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July 22, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 15, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Andrew Pike (American)

        • B.A. 1972, Swarthmore
        • J.D. 1976, Pennsylvania
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Pike Unlike many professors highlighted in the Taxprof Spotlight, I was a tax geek early on. Before my first year at Penn Law, my career goal was to work in the Treasury Department’s Office of Tax Policy!

  As background, I majored in economics at Swarthmore College and, after graduation, I worked as a research assistant to the late Joseph Pechman of the Brookings Institution. There, I helped Dr. Pechman analyze proposed changes to the tax laws, with a primary focus on the magnitude and distributional consequences of proposed legislative changes to the tax laws. I was hooked, and tax law became my likely career specialty. This was reinforced at Penn Law, where I had the additional good fortune to study with Danny Halperin and Al Warren.

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July 15, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 8, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Diana L. Leyden (Connecticut)

        • B.A. 1978, Union College
        • J.D. 1982, Connecticut
        • LL.M. (Tax) 1984, Georgetown

         

     

Dleyden_2 Diana Leyden is an Associate Clinical Professor at Connecticut and the director of its Tax Clinic, a low income taxpayer clinic. In addition to teaching the Tax Clinic program, Diana has taught federal income tax and corporate tax.

The road to law school and tax was filled with serendipity. After completing a college thesis applying the work of George Katona in the field of behavioral economics to the Soviet Union’s planned economy and predicting the downfall of the planned economy, she was asked to continue in a masters program to do further research. But, she decided she had had enough of academia and declined. Then, unemployed, she found a job as the first paralegal hired by a Waterbury, Connecticut firm (Carmody & Torrance) and started working with two wonderful, mentoring attorneys in their trusts and estate practice. At their elbows, she learned about the estate and gifts taxes and was smitten with tax law.

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July 8, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 1, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Stephen B. Cohen (Georgetown)

        • A.B. 1967, Amherst
        • J.D. 1971, Yale

   

 

Cohen_stephen Stephen Cohen has led a double professional life, engaged on the one hand in political and foreign policy issues, and on the other, as an academic tax lawyer. In 1968, the year after graduating from Amherst, he worked for Senator Eugene McCarthy's presidential campaign, doing a variety of jobs including speechwriting, political advertising, press relations, and staging mass rallies. Law school initially consisted of continuing political work for the Moratorium to End the Vietnam War and the National Citizens Committee Concerned About the Anti-Ballistic Missile System, until the second semester of his second year, when he fell for Tax with Marvin Chirelstein, whom he describes as “the greatest classroom teacher I ever had.” 

   

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July 1, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, June 24, 2006

Spotlight_1_1William H. Lyons (Nebraska)

        • B.A. 1969, Colby College
        • J.D. 1973, Boston College

   

 

Lyons_2I joined the faculty of the University of Nebraska College of Law in 1981. My path to law school teaching was somewhat different than the traditional path of working for a large firm in a large metropolitan area for a few years with, perhaps, an additional year or two as a judicial clerk. I practiced in Bangor, Maine with the law firm of Vafiades, Brountas & Kominsky, where I was one of seven lawyers. I stayed at the firm for eight years, the last two years as a partner. I owe a great debt to my former partner, Nick Brountas, a wonderful mentor who should have been a law school professor.

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June 24, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, June 17, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Allison Christians (Wisconsin)

        • B.A. 1991, Calvin College
        • J.D. 1999, Columbia
        • LL.M. (Tax) 2003, NYU

      

   

Christians_4I owe my passion for tax law to “Marvelous” Marvin Chirelstein, who was a teacher and mentor to me while I was a student at Columbia. His acerbic wit and lack of patience for the bombastic were treasures in the classroom. His straightforward, pragmatic approach to the tax law, epitomized in the “Little Blue Book,” was an indispensable aid to me, first in learning about tax as a student and now in teaching tax to the next generation. I was shocked by my stage fright on the first day I walked into the classroom to teach federal income taxation. Now, having taught the course a few times, I am less shocked by the stage fright but still anxious that I somehow find a way to reach the students with even a fraction of the impact that Marvin had on me.

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June 17, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, June 10, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Bruce A. McGovern (South Texas)

        • B.A. 1984, Columbia
        • J.D. 1989, Fordham
        • LL.M. (Tax) 1996, Florida

    

 

Mcgovern_1

In my Federal Income Tax class, I always tell the students on the first day that many tax lawyers, and even tax professors, were once law students who thought they would have little interest in tax. I am one of those people.

I grew up in Portland, Maine, an old seacoast city for which I still retain great fondness. I left Portland to attend college in New York City. I spent my freshman year at the New School for Social Research. It was a wonderful year that, to say the least, had the effect of expanding and radically altering my point of view. I transferred for my sophomore year to Columbia, where I studied religion. During my years at Columbia I met the woman who is now my wife, Fabienne. Upon graduating, I considered either entering the Episcopal ministry or pursuing a Ph.D. in religion to become a college professor. Ultimately, I decided to attend law school at Fordham.

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June 10, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, June 3, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Reuven S. Avi-Yonah (Michigan)

        • B.A. 1983, Hebrew University
        • A.M. 1984, Harvard
        • Ph.D. 1986. Harvard
        • J.D. 1989, Harvard

   

Avyonah Reuven S. Avi-Yonah is the Irwin I. Cohn Professor of Law and Director of the International Tax LLM Program and the Michigan-Tsinghua Exchange Program at the University of Michigan Law School. He teaches the basic course on taxation and courses on international taxation, corporate taxation, multinational enterprises and the law, and the origins and development of the corporate form. He has published numerous articles on domestic and international tax issues, and is the author of U.S. International Taxation: Cases and Materials (Foundation Press, 2d ed. 2005) (with Brauner & Ring), Amortization of Intangibles (1994), The Attribution Rules (1996), co-author of Collapsible Corporations (1995) and Transfer Pricing: Judicial Strategy and Outcomes (1995), and co-editor of Taxation of Financial Instruments (Clark, Boardman, Callaghan, 1996).

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June 3, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, May 27, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Reginald Mombrun (Florida A&M)

        • B.S. 1985, Boston University
        • J.D. 1988, North Carolina Central
        • LL.M. (Taxation) 1989, Florida

      

 

Mombrun

My story into tax is not unlike the many tax profiles that I have read over the past two years. The only major twist is probably that I hail from Haiti, the second country in the Americas to achieve independence. Unfortunately, this fact has remained our peak achievement.

My parents settled in Boston, Massachusetts after migrating from Haiti. I graduated from Boston University with a degree in Business Administration and was debating between law school or getting an M.B.A. When I looked at sample questions for the GRE and the LSAT, I was fascinated by the LSAT questions, so I decided to try law school.

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May 27, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, May 20, 2006

Spotlight_1_1David M. Hasen (Michigan)

        • B.A. 1984, Reed College
        • Ph.D. 1993. Harvard
        • J.D. 1996, Yale

   

      

Hasen_1

I am one of those people who “fell” into tax law. After college I entered a Ph.D. program in political science, planning for a teaching career. My main interest was political theory. By the time I completed the program, however, there were few teaching jobs, and prospects in political science seemed dim. I therefore took what seemed like the default option and went to law school. At the time I was considering both a law teaching career and law practice.

I took the introductory federal income tax course as a 2L, but only because I believed that a basic knowledge of tax law was important for a lawyer starting out; it was not a course that I thought I would enjoy. In fact I was pretty anxious about it. I was not at all sure I would be able to deal with all the numbers I expected or to navigate the dense Code language that, as one of my classmates once noted, “never seems to get past the optic nerve.”

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May 20, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, May 13, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Bridget J. Crawford (Pace)

        • B.A. 1991, Yale
        • J.D. 1996, Penn
    •    

   

      

Crawford_2I am an Associate Professor at Pace Law School where I teach Federal Income Tax, Estate & Gift Tax and Feminist Legal Theory.  For the Fall 2006 semester, I will be a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where I will be teaching Wills, Trusts & Estates, too. 

I love teaching, studying and writing about tax because it is the subject that I have to work at the most to understand the least.  I entered law teaching after more than six years as an associate in the Trusts & Estates department at Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP in New York.

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May 13, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, May 6, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Calvin H. Johnson (Texas)

        • B.A. 1966, Columbia
        • J.D. 1971, Stanford
    •    

      

   

Johnson_calvin_lgMy new book, Righteous Anger at the Wicked States: The Meaning of the Founders' Constitution (Cambridge University Press, 2005) has been great fun. The Constitution was once a weapon in a hard-fought war and its weapon-like characteristics provide its meaning. I started the book with a theory that the Constitution was a tax document, a pro-tax document to get the Revolutionary War debts paid. But Hamilton made it too easy once he became Secretary of the Treasury. The tax part could have been acheived without the radical nationalizing changes the Constitution effected. Anger at the states provided the necessary, indeed the primary driving force, both to get over some serious hurdles and to keep the movement going. I have presented the book now to student or faculty groups at Yale, Northwestern, Penn, Harvard, Texas and Columbia Law Schools and on C-Span2 Book TV. I was able to write this book only because of the new digital archives. I threw out my net into the digital archives over and over again and I just reported my catch. Try it: Do a search for "direct tax" or "slavery" in Elliot's Records or in Letters of the Delegates here.

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May 6, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, April 29, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Nina J. Crimm (St. John's)

        • B.A. 1972, Washington University
        • M.B.A. 1979, Tulane
        • J.D. 1979, Tulane
        • LL.M. (Tax) 1981, Georgetown

 

Crimm_1 Scrabble and crossword puzzles always fascinated me. Each has interlocking parts. Scrabble requires players to construct new words upon those existing on the board. One is not sure where the word building will lead – but physical connections must be maintained. Crossword puzzles also have word connections. Artful clue phrases hint at words, and resulting words must connect in a defined grid. Each game and puzzle is entertaining; no Scrabble game unfolds exactly as another and no crossword puzzle is exactly alike. No wonder that I was playfully captivated by the artful phrases, clues, and connections of the Internal Revenue Code. When I was introduced to the Code, I believed that if I could spend my life playing its games and puzzles at work, why not?

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April 29, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, April 22, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Jeffrey L. Kwall (Loyola-Chicago; Visiting at Northwestern)

        • B.A. 1977, Bucknell
        • M.B.A. 1981, Penn
        • J.D. 1981, Penn

 

 

Kwall_1 I never contemplated a teaching career. After working my way through college, I set my sights on becoming a corporate lawyer in a big Wall Street firm. But the twists and turns of life lead one in unexpected directions.

After spending the summer after my first year of law school at a Philadelphia megafirm, the security of knowing I had a good home if desired allowed me to try something very different during my second summer. I found a mid-size firm in Beverly Hills that had begun as a tax boutique and evolved into a thriving general business practice. What a summer that was! My eyes were opened to the joys of a transactional practice where you did the tax work and executed the transaction in an environment that was nothing short of spectacular. But having spent my entire life in Pennsylvania, I wasn’t ready to give up the changing seasons so I spent my third year of law school searching for that Beverly Hills practice in an eastern (relatively speaking) locale. That search took me to many cities, one of which was Chicago, a place that I had never before seen but instantly felt like home.

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April 22, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, April 15, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Carolyn L. Dessin (Akron)

        • B.M. Ed. 1978, Temple
        • M.M. 1980, Westminster Choir College
        • J.D. 1987, Villanova

 

 

Dessin My road to teaching tax law was definitely not direct. I started out as a musician who wanted to teach and conduct, and received a Bachelor of Music Education degree in voice from Temple University. I went on to receive a Master of Music in Choral Conducting from Westminster Choir College, where I studied with Joseph Flummerfelt. I became a music teacher in the Colonial School District in suburban Philadelphia and a Director of Music in several Philadelphia area churches. Many public schools were suffering reductions in force during that time, and I kept getting “RIF”fed at the end of each school year and hired back in the following year for a more and more part-time position. Like most musicians, I also taught private piano students and played weddings and bar mitzvahs.

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April 15, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, April 8, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.)

        • B.A. 1973, Harvard
        • J.D. 1976, Harvard

   

 

Seto_feb_06 Early in my career, defending a class action sex discrimination lawsuit on behalf of a Fortune 500 company, I was prepping the company’s VP for Customer Service. I began with the standard questions, including “Tell me about your background.” His answer shaped the way I’ve since thought about my life: “I decided long ago that I wanted to try as many different things as possible, and that I would therefore never hold any job for more than 5 years.” He had been in the OSS (predecessor to the CIA), a ward boss for the Republican Party, a road laborer, editor of two women’s magazines – and that was only the beginning. “Wow!,” I thought, “I’d hate to be your wife.”

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April 8, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (1)

Saturday, April 1, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Walter D. Schwidetzky (Baltimore)

        • B.A. 1974, Denver
        • J.D. & M.B.A. 1978, Denver
        • LL.M. (Tax)  1984, Denver

   

 

SchwidetzkyI backed into academics, though in retrospect I should have realized from the outset that I was destined for the academic life. My paternal grandmother had three children. Each child had one son, and one of her children also had two daughters. All of the sons and one of the daughters are professors, in two countries, in (depending on how one is counting) three or four different areas. If I had known I was going to end up as a professor, I probably would have found a way to complete my higher education at more than one institution.   

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April 1, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 25, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Gregory Germain (Syracuse)

        • J.D. 1985, Hastings
        • LL.M. (Tax)  2001, Florida

 

 

Germain_1 I enrolled in law school intending to become a tax lawyer. I don’t know why I wanted to be a tax lawyer. I had no experience with the subject. I think it was because I liked money, and thought that tax law had something to do with it. As with many law students, however, circumstances took me in an entirely different direction.

I got a summer job after my first year of law school at the largest bankruptcy law firm in San Francisco. It was 1983, and the bankruptcy system was in a state of shambles. The Supreme Court had recently ruled the entire bankruptcy system unconstitutional because it vested bankruptcy judges, who did not have the Article III guarantees of life tenure or undiminishable salaries, with broad subject matter jurisdiction over matters only related to bankruptcy. Because of the enormous volume of bankruptcy cases (more bankruptcy cases are filed each year than all other federal court cases combined), the Supreme Court took the extraordinary step of staying its ruling several times, allowing the unconstitutional system to continue in the hope that Congress would soon fix the jurisdictional problem. Finally, after Congress repeatedly failed to act, the Supreme Court pulled the plug on the entire system. An emergency rule was slapped together to keep the bankruptcy courts open while more permanent measures could be worked out. It was a very interesting time to be involved in bankruptcy, and I was hooked. I took every commercial law course offered by my law school, and spent part of my third law school year as a judicial extern for the Chief Bankruptcy Judge in San Francisco, Judge Lloyd King, who later became the sole bankruptcy judge in Hawaii. I ended up taking only one tax class in law school, Tax I, from a young professor named Stephen Lind.

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March 25, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 18, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Henry M. Ordower (St. Louis)

        • A.B. 1967, Washington University
        • M.A. 1970, Chicago
        • J.D. 1975, Chicago

 

 

Ordower_3“On a dark and stormy night” in March, 1972, I concluded that it was time to abandon the Ph.D. work in Scandinavian Languages and Literatures I had pursued for five years and change to a field offering opportunities for employment and the ability to provide for our two sons. Our third son joined the group during my final year in law school, while my wife Ilene was in the middle of her MBA program at the University of Chicago. With ABD (all but dissertation) in hand, I applied to a couple of law schools. The University of Chicago admitted me. Knowing a degree from the U of C might open the door to law teaching, I put aside the Ph.D. work that still drew me in order to develop myself in law. Twenty-six years later in December 1998, while serving as vice president and general counsel and to an emerging markets, hedge fund manager (on a leave from SLU Law after more than twenty years teaching), Ilene and I, following a rough crossing of the Drake passage, stepped from a zodiac onto Antarctica, our seventh continent (six by the European view). By then all our boys were finished with college and establishing themselves in their careers. Life and tax law indeed have been great to me.

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March 18, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 11, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Mark W. Cochran (St. Mary's)

        • A.B.J. 1977, Georgia
        • J.D. 1980, Vanderbilt
        • L.L.M. (Tax) 1981, Florida

 

 

Cochran_m Teaching is the only career I’ve ever considered, other than astronaut, professional athlete, fifth Beatle, Pulitzer winning journalist, and high powered attorney. How I ended up teaching federal tax law rather than history or algebra, on the other hand, requires a bit of explanation.

By the time I started high school, Neil Armstrong had walked on the moon and the Beatles were in the process of breaking up. My football career had peaked in eighth grade, when I saw action in one game and almost made a tackle. Having come to grips with my lack of athletic ability, I volunteered as a photographer for the high school newspaper. I demonstrated some talent for photography and ultimately for writing as well, with a particular flair for satire. At the time, I fancied myself as a the next Art Buchwald or Margaret Bourke-White. My senior year I was editor in chief of the newspaper, and this led me to major in Journalism at the University of Georgia. My choice was solidified the summer before I started college, when the Watergate hearings took center stage and two reporters named Woodward and Bernstein became national heroes.

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March 11, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 4, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Jeffrey G. Sherman (Chicago-Kent)

        • A.B. 1968, Harvard
        • J.D. 1972, Harvard

      

   

Sherman An English actor (possibly David Garrick) is said to have been visited on his deathbed by a friend, who complimented the actor on the calmness and gallantry with which he was facing his coming end. The actor replied, “Dying is easy. Farce is hard.” I think of those words as I sit down to write this profile: talking about myself is easy; writing about myself is hard.

I haven’t done much nonscholarly writing since my last year in law school, when I was the lyricist for the law school show, an original musical that the students presented each year. Our show concerned three law students who ran away from law school to join the circus. One of the songs I wrote was called, “One Ball.” It was about an incompetent juggler who could juggle only one ball at a time, and I can’t be blamed if you thought the song was about something else.

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March 4, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 25, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Nancy S. Abramowitz (American)

        • B.S. 1972, Cornell
        • J.D. 1975, Georgetown

   

 

AbramowitzI began my career more than thirty years ago as a law clerk to Judge Theodore Tannenwald, Jr. of the U.S. Tax Court. From there I moved on to private practice at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. I practiced tax and employee benefits at the firm and was an associate (1977-82) and a partner 1982-1991). With three children on the home front, I left the firm although I spent a couple of years continuing to work from home on several large continuing matters. My practice experience was diverse: international and domestic; transactional, controversy and legislative work. I also had the opportunity to do benefits work from both management and labor union perspectives. My pro bono time was generally spent training and then volunteering in our local court’s and federal district court’s earliest efforts at court-annexed alternative dispute resolution.

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February 25, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 18, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Wendy Gerzog (Baltimore)

        • B.S. 1968, Clark
        • M.A. 1971, Assumption
        • J.D. 1976, Akron
        • LL.M. (Tax) 1979, George Washington

 

Gerzog_4 Like many others, particularly women, I took an indirect route to becoming a lawyer.

A night student in my senior year of college, I worked in the actuarial department of an insurance company, but soon found myself being trained in Fortran and Cobol at “IBM School.” I disliked programming and so, when I graduated, I very happily quit and began teaching dramatics at Lincoln House, a girls club. I then got my master’s degree in English, taught high school English, and had fun directing the junior and senior class plays (“R.U.R.” and “The Bald Soprano”). Having by that time moved from Massachusetts to Ohio, I took the rest of my required Ph.D. classes in English and taught freshman literature at Kent State. Because I was evidently still “finding myself,” I considered taking a one-year leave of absence to try law school. I drove over to the University of Akron, talked to the Associate Dean, applied and began law school that fall. I was one of those people who actually loved law school. Because Ohio tested on Income Tax, Corporate Tax, and Estate and Gift Tax, I took several tax courses and was surprised to do well in them.

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February 18, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 11, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Roberta F. Mann (Widener)

        • B.S. 1980, Arizona State
        • M.B.A. 1982, Arizona State
        • J.D. 1987, Arizona State
        • LL.M. (Tax) 1995, Georgetown

 

Mann_5 Well, I thought this day would never come! Too late to be a new tax professor profile, and not quite mature enough to be a classic. Now I have to find something interesting and original to say about my career path leading to my current position at Widener.

First, I have never been good at career planning. Serendipity is my favored method. It has always worked for me. I went to law school because I was tired of doing monthly production, inventory and sales reports in my first “real” job for a pharmaceutical company. Every month, the same old thing!

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February 11, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 4, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Stuart Lazar (Thomas Cooley)

        • A.B. 1990, Michigan
        • J.D. 1992, Michigan
        • LL.M. (Tax) 1996, NYU

 

 

Lazar_1 In my second year of college, as a young economics major, I faced a choice: pursue a bachelor’s in business administration or go to law school. Obviously, I chose the latter route -- but with the idea that I wanted to pursue a career in “business” law. A class taken the following year -- Tax Accounting -- pushed me towards a career in tax law. It was a decision that I would never look back on.

During my time at Michigan, I was fortunate to study tax law with the “Big Three” (a reference here to the Michigan auto industry) -- Professors Doug Kahn, Jeff Lehman and Patricia White. From them, I learned not only substantive tax law but about my love for the intricacies of the tax code. I also learned two very important things. First, it is not only the what, but the why, that matters (i.e., policy plays an extremely important role) in shaping substantive law. Second, that a great professor could make learning tax law fun.

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February 4, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, January 28, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Michael Mulroney (Villanova)

        • B.S.C. 1954, Iowa
        • J.D. 1959, Harvard

   

   

Mulroney_1With no intended reflection on those who may follow me in the Spotlight, I can only assume that by asking me to do this one Paul Caron has about reached the bottom of the barrel of candidates for this blog feature who are over the age of 70.

Probably because of the number of appellate cases I’ve argued over the years, and the advice I’ve given to students in moot court competitions, I’m a bit uncomfortable in using the first person to describe myself. But here goes.

I peaked early in my formal education. Just as the Korean War began I graduated first in my Elkader, Iowa high school class of 28–a class rank that I would never again come close to achieving in college or law school. My aunt, the clerk of the local Draft Board, was somewhat apprehensive about the small-town public perception involved in giving me an educational deferment to get an economics degree from the University of Iowa when all the rest of my high school classmates were being sent off to war. However, she was able to rehabilitate herself in her own eyes by shipping me off to basic training (at Camp Caffee, Arkansas then, and maybe still today, the armpit of the universe) the day after college graduation.

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January 28, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, January 21, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Richard Winchester (Thomas Jefferson)

        • A.B. 1984, Princeton
        • J.D. 1992, Yale

   

   

Winchester_1A tax professor both by accident and by design, I have unconsciously prepared for this line of work ever since high school.

Unlike many of my classmates at Princeton, I had only a vague idea of what I wanted to do when I grew up. I found myself one of the few students admitted to the undergraduate program at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, giving me the freedom to take virtually any social science course in the university. The liberal arts course of study equipped me with the strong writing and analytical skills that I now know are indispensable to any legal scholar.

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January 21, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, January 14, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Joel S. Newman (Wake Forest)

        • A.B. 1968, Brown
        • J.D. 1971, Chicago

   

   

NewmanIn college, I wanted to be a city planner, so I thought I’d get a master’s in public administration, city planning, something like that. Then I discovered that most of the folks who were really making a difference in urban renewal were lawyers, so I went to law school instead. While I was at it, I spent two summers working with the redevelopment agency in New York City. I reached two conclusions: 1) that the problems of large cities (especially New York) were insoluble, and I didn’t want to spend my life butting my head against a wall; and 2) that the property and urban renewal courses I took in law school were really boring (I didn’t especially like the tax courses either, but I loved Professor Wally Blum). However, by that point, I was halfway through law school, so I thought I might as well stick it out.

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January 14, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, January 7, 2006

Spotlight_1_1Joni Larson (Thomas Cooley)

        • J.D. 1989, Montana
        • LL.M. 1990, Florida

   

   

Larson

Teaching is not something you usually envision one of the quietest students in the class doing. Or litigation either. But, that is where my path from law school has led me. 

After graduating from the University of Montana School of Law I traveled to the University of Florida to earn my LL.M. in Taxation. After that, a position at the United States Tax Court clerking for Judge Irene Scott gave me an insider’s perspective on tax litigation. While I hadn’t had any interest in litigation during law school, a unique set of circumstances led me to accept a job as a tax litigator in Austin, Texas, for the IRS’s Office of Chief Counsel.

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January 7, 2006 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, December 31, 2005

Spotlight_1_1Nancy A. McLaughlin (Utah)

        • B.S. 1987, University of Massachusetts
        • J.D. 1990, University of Virginia

   

 

Nancy_3After graduating from the University of Massachusetts with an honors degree in psychology and having been elected to Phi Beta Kappa and appointed a Phi Kappa Phi math scholar, I left my home state to attend law school in lovely Charlottesville, Virginia. It was there that I met my husband (a Virginia native, whose family was alarmed at the prospect of his marrying a Yankee) and discovered my affinity for tax law.

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December 31, 2005 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, December 17, 2005

Tax Prof Profile: University of Houston -- Ira Shepard

Spotlight_1The University of Hoston Law Center has a long history of strong tax teaching and scholarship.  UH has a well-regarded graduate tax program, anchored by four tenured and tenure track tax faculty and supported by a prestigious group of adjunct faculty drawn from Houston's leading law firms.

We conclude our profiles of Houston's tax faculty this week by shining the spotlight on Ira B. Shepard

 

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      • A.B. 1958, Harvard
      • J.D. 1964, Harvard

Irashepard_1

The one thing I learned very early in life was to seek out competent people. I have always surrounded myself with colleagues who were more capable than I. This is exemplified by my current tax colleagues, Bill Streng and Johnny Rex Buckles, whose biographies bracket mine (in alphabetical order) on these three successive Saturdays, and by my new colleague, Christine L. Agnew, whose biography appeared earlier this fall.

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December 17, 2005 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, December 10, 2005

Tax Prof Profile: University of Houston -- William Streng

Spotlight_1The University of Hoston Law Center has a long history of strong tax teaching and scholarship.  UH has a well-regarded graduate tax program, anchored by five tenured and tenure track tax faculty and supported by a prestigious group of adjunct faculty drawn from Houston's leading law firms.

We continue our profiles of Houston's tax faculty this week by shining the spotlight on  William P. Streng

 

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      • A.B. 1959, Wartburg College
      • J.D. 1962, Northwestern

Williamstreng Having practiced tax law in three large law firms, been in three U.S. Government positions (not counting the U.S. Marine Corps!) and having taught in multiple law schools, I could be perceived as a true example of the itinerant professional. However, each step had a natural progression which has been quite rewarding over a now extended tax law academic career. And, for approximately the last 20 years my academic base has been at the University of Houston Law Center.

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December 10, 2005 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, December 3, 2005

Tax Prof Profile: University of Houston -- Johnny Rex Buckles

Spotlight_1The University of Hoston Law Center has a long history of strong tax teaching and scholarship.  UH has a well-regarded graduate tax program, anchored by five tenured and tenure track tax faculty and supported by a prestigious group of adjunct faculty drawn from Houston's leading law firms.

In our just-completed 14-part series of profiles tax professors who have begun their careers at American law schools this fall, we profiled Christine Agnew, a very promising young tax teacher and scholar. Over the next four weeks, we will profile Houston's other tax faculty, beginning this week with Johhny Rex Buckles:

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      • B.S. 1989, Oklahoma State
      • J.D. 1992, Harvard
      • M.A. 1999, Dallas Theological Seminary

Johnnybuckles_1My career aspirations initially pointed me to other worlds, when at the ripe age of three I declared my desire to become an astronaut. Three or four years later, a much more mature child, I settled for aspiring to the Presidency of the United States. Apparently disillusionment with the political process altered those plans, for after a few more years I decided to become a preacher, and then a carpenter. By my twelfth year, however, I had set my sights on law.

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December 3, 2005 in Tax Prof Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)