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Friday, March 28, 2014

Tax LL.M. Program Rankings by Tax Hiring Authorities

Tax TalentFollowing up on my post on the new 2015 U.S. News Tax Rankings: TaxTalent asked U.S. corporate tax hiring authorities to rank the following programs:

  • Undergraduate Accounting
  • MS Tax
  • MAcc
  • MAcc Tax
  • MBA Tax
  • JD Tax
  • LL.M. Tax

For the LL.M. Tax Survey, respondents were asked to select up to five schools (out of 31) with LL.M. Tax programs that they hold in highest regard when hiring candidates.  Respondent Profile: 144 currently employed heads of corporate in-house tax departments.

2014 LLM

For the J.D. Tax Survey, respondents were asked to select up to five schools (out of 20) with JD Tax programs that they hold in highest regard when hiring candidates.  It is a bizarre list of 20 law schools, as it omits 14 of the 15 schools ranked in tax by U.S. News (Georgetown is the only school ranked by both U.S. News and Tax Talent.) 

March 28, 2014 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (5)

Friday, September 7, 2012

Phillips & Yoo: A Better Faculty Citation Rankings System

James Cleith Phillips & John Yoo (both of UC-Berkeley), The Cite Stuff: Inventing a Better Law Faculty Relevance Measure:

Citation rankings as a measure of scholarly quality are both controversial and popular. They provide a quantitative, albeit imperfect, measure of intellectual impact and productivity. But the number of times a scholar has been cited by his peers confers more than just bragging rights. They arguably help form the reputation of American legal scholars to the point that they have allegedly influenced faculty hiring decisions, and their collective impact may well shape the ranking of law schools themselves.

Arguably, the most well-known such metric for legal scholarship is the method used by Brian Leiter of the University of Chicago Law School and posted on his website. Despite the methodological rigorousness of the Leiter system, it suffers from some well-recognized limitations. It is biased in favor of schools with older, smaller faculties, for example, and against schools that do not produce as much peer-reviewed scholarship.

This study seeks to improve on earlier efforts by producing a more relevant and accurate citation-based ranking system. It produces a measure that explains 81% of the variation in the U.S. News academic peer rankings, implicitly revealing how schools could boost those rankings, and lists the most cited professors based on this new ranking methodology, both overall, amongst younger scholars, and in 20 areas of legal scholarship. This allows for the top school in each area of law to be calculated, which could be useful to aspiring J.D. students who desire to know the best school in the area(s) of law they are most interested in. Finally, this study proposes an alternative faculty ranking system focusing on the percentage of a law school faculty that are “All-Stars” (ranked in the top 10 in citations per year in an area of law). This alternative ranking system improves upon some of the weaknesses of previous faculty quality ranking methodologies and argues that citation-based studies do measure something important -- relevance of scholarship.

Here are the Top 10 Tax Professors in Total Cites Per Year:

  1. Alan Auerbach (UC-Berkeley) (54.3)
  2. Mihir Desai (Harvard) (54.0)
  3. James Hines (Michigan) (52.4)
  4. David Weisbach (Chicago) (45.4)
  5. Daniel Shaviro (NYU) (44.1)
  6. Reuven Avi-Yonah (Michigan) (40.9)
  7. Michael Graetz (Columbia) (36.2)
  8. Michael Knoll (Pennsylvania) (35.8)
  9. Robert Green (Cornell) (33.6)
  10. Thomas Brennan (Northwestern) (33.2)

Here are the Top 5 Law School Tax Faculties in Total Cites Per Year:

  1. Harvard (188.2) (Mihir Desai, Louis Kaplow)
  2. Michigan (93.3) (James Hines, Reuven Avi-Yonah)
  3. UC-Berkeley (54.3) (Alan Auerbach)
  4. Chicago (45.4) (David Weisbach)
  5. NYU (44.1) (Daniel Shaviro)

September 7, 2012 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Scholarship, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings, Tax Prof Rankings | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Tax LL.M. Program Rankings by Tax Hiring Authorities

I previously blogged the 2012 and 2013 U.S. News Tax LL.M. program rankings:

2013

Rank

Grad Tax

Program

2012

Rank

1

NYU

1

2

Florida

2

3

Georgetown

3

4

Northwestern

4

5

Boston University

6

6

Miami

5

7

Loyola-L.A.

7

8

San Diego

8

9

Villanova

8

10

Denver

n/r

n/r

U. Washington

10

n/r

Chapman

11

(The 2008-2011 U.S. News Tax LL.M. rankings are here.)

JobsInTax.com, part of the TaxTalent network, has released another ranking of tax LL.M. programs, based on the responses of 151 heads of corporate tax departments:

Respondents were asked to select up to five schools (out of 32) with LLM Tax programs that they hold in the highest regard when hiring candidates. Schools were then ranked based on the total number of votes they received.

Top 20 Tax LLM

This is the first of a two-part survey, the second of which will ask the opinions of alumni of LLM Tax programs, in order to provide an index of which LLM Tax programs are consistently held in high regard by both alumni and tax hiring authorities. 

(Of course, several of these schools do not have Tax LL.M. programs (University of California, Kansas, Lewis & Clark, New Mexico, Richmond, Washington & Lee.)

For more on graduate tax program rankings, see Jennifer Kowal (Loyola-L.A.), Katherine Pratt (Loyola-L.A.), Theodore Seto (Loyola-L.A.) & Paul Caron (Cincinnati), Pursuing a Tax LLM Degree: Where?.

September 4, 2012 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 22, 2011

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

SSRN Updated Sept. 29, 2011Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his ranking of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through Sept. 9, 2011). To minimize the distortive effect of his own rankings articles, he has eliminated from Loyola-L.A.’s count downloads attributable to his own two most downloaded articles, neither of which pertains directly to tax. He has not eliminated downloads of non-tax articles from the counts of any other author.

 

 

All-Time Downloads

 

Recent Downloads

1

Michigan

40,754

Michigan

7353

2

Harvard

30,062

Illinois

5368

3

Illinois

26,241

Florida

4221

4

Pennsylvania.

18,729

Cincinnati

4107

5

Cincinnati

17,771

Harvard

3552

6

Colorado

17,209

Loyola-L.A.

3423

7

USC

16,652

UC-Davis

3026

8

UC-Davis

16,432

USC

2698

9

Loyola-L.A.

16,417

NYU

2639

10

Chicago

15,922

Pennsylvania

2209

11

UCLA

14,709

Chapman

2151

12

Florida

13,785

Brooklyn

2086

13

NYU

12,801

Chicago

2032

14

Boston College

11,924

Minnesota

1967

15

Columbia

11,557

Boston College

1938

16

Chapman

11,290

Colorado

1867

17

Brooklyn

10,967

Pace

1866

18

Boston Univ.

10,856

UCLA

1834

19

Vanderbilt

8941

Vanderbilt

1793

20

Baltimore

8862

Case Western

1610

21

Pace

7962

Columbia

1609

22

Stanford

7775

Baltimore

1605

23

Notre Dame

7749

San Diego

1431

24

Florida State

7739

Boston Univ.

1405

25

Indiana

6998

Florida State

1353

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any full-time law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. Articles co-authored by members of a single faculty are counted only once towards that faculty’s tally.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

September 22, 2011 in Legal Education, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

New 2012 U.S. News Tax Rankings

U.S. News LogoHere are the new 2012 U.S. News Tax Rankings, along with last year's rankings. The big changes from 2011 are (1) Florida moving ahead of Georgetown at #2, and (2) the number of schools without tax LL.M. programs moving up in the rankings (10) and the number of schools with tax LL.M. programs moving down (6):

2012

Rank

 Tax

Program

2011

Rank

1

NYU

1

2

Florida

3

3

Georgetown

2

4

Northwestern

4

5

Miami

5

6

Harvard

8

7

UCLA

11

8

Virginia

10

9

Boston University

6

10

Columbia

14

10

Loyola-L.A.

9

10

Stanford

13

10

Texas

18

14

Michigan

16

14

USC

16

16

Boston College

18

16

Pennsylvania

n/r

16

San Diego

6

16

Villanova

21

20

U. Washington

n/r

21

Chapman

n/r

22

Chicago

21

22

UC-Hastings

18

n/r

Denver

12

n/r

SMU

14

Here are the rankings of the graduate tax programs, along with last year's rankings:

2012

Rank

Grad Tax

Program

2011

Rank

1

NYU

1

2

Florida

3

3

Georgetown

2

4

Northwestern

4

5

Miami

5

6

Boston University

6

7

Loyola-L.A.

8

8

San Diego

6

8

Villanova

11

10

U. Washington

n/r

11

Chapman

n/r

n/r

Denver

9

n/r

SMU

10

The U.S. News tax survey instrument states that it is intended "to identify the law schools having the top programs in tax law." The survey is sent "to a sample of law school faculty listed in the AALS Directory of Law Teachers 2009-2010 as currently teaching a course or seminar in tax law." Recipients are asked "to [i]dentify up to fifteen (15) schools that have the highest-quality tax law courses or programs. In making your choices consider all elements that contribute to a program's excellence, for example, the depth and breadth of the program, faculty research and publication record, etc."

As Donald Tobin (Ohio State) has noted, it is more than strange that NYU has finished ahead of Florida and Georgetown each year that U.S. News has conducted the survey.  Because the survey ranks the schools by how often they appear on the respondents' "Top 15" lists, this means that some folks list NYU, but not Florida and Georgetown, among the Top 15 tax programs.

For more on tax rankings, see our article, Pursuing a Tax LLM Degree: Where?, which compiles information about 13 highly ranked tax LLM programs: (1) NYU; (2) Florida; (3) Georgetown; (4) Northwestern; (5) Miami; (6) Boston University; (7) San Diego; (8) Loyola-L.A./LMU; (9) SMU; (10) Denver; (11) University of Washington; (12) Villanova; and (13) Chapman. The topics on which information is reported in the Article include: (1) tuition; (2) scholarships; (3) the full-time tax professors who teach in each program and the tax courses they teach; (4) the number of full-time and part-time students enrolled in each program; (5) general information about adjunct professors teaching in each program; (6) required courses; (7) elective courses, specialty certificates, and concentrations; (8) opportunities to develop tax practice skills by taking experiential learning courses and simulated practice courses; (9) extracurricular tax activities; (10) opportunities to graduate with honors or receive academic prizes; and (11) career planning and placement services offered to students in each program. The article also ranks the tax faculty at these thirteen law schools by citations (the Top 5 are NYU (1), Florida (2), Georgetown (3), Miami (4), and Northwestern (5)) and SSRN downloads (the Top 5 are Loyola-L.A. (1), NYU (2), Chapman (3), Florida (4), and San Diego (5)).

Other resources available on TaxProf Blog include:

March 16, 2011 in Legal Education, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

The 18 Most-Cited Tax Faculty

Brian Leiter (Chicago) has finalized his ranking of the Highest Impact Faculty in 13 Areas of Specialization, including tax, as measured by citations during the past five years (Jan. 1, 2005 - Jan. 15, 2010):

Rank

Tax Prof

Citations

Age

1

Michael Graetz (Yale)

370

66

2

Daniel Shaviro (NYU)

310

53

3

David Weisbach (Chicago)

300

47

4

Edward McCaffery (USC)

280

52

5

Reuven Avi-Yonah (Michigan)

260

53

 

Edward Zelinsky (Cardozo)

260

60

7

Lawrence Zelenak (Duke)

240

55

8

Joseph Bankman (Stanford)

230

55

9

Victor Fleischer (Colorado)

200

39

 

Leandra Lederman (Indiana)

200

44

 

Nancy Staudt (Northwestern)

200

47

12

Marjorie Kornhauser (Arizona St.)

190

63

13

Calvin Johnson (Texas)

180

66

 

Deborah Schenk (NYU)

180

63

15

David Schizer (Columbia)

170

42

16

Howard Abrams (Emory)

160

55

 

Anne Alstott (Harvard)

160

47

 

Thomas Griffith (USC)

160

61

Highly-cited scholars whose cites are not exclusively in this area:

  • Louis Kaplow (Harvard) (age 54), 970 citations
  • Kristin Hickman (Minnesota) (age 40), 230 citations
  • Mark Gergen (UC-Berkeley) (age 54), 210 citations
  • Kyle Logue (Michigan) (age 45), 180 citations

In our article, Pursuing a Tax LLM Degree: Where?, Jennifer M. Kowal (Loyola-L.A.), Katherine Pratt (Loyola-L.A.), Theodore P. Seto(Loyola-L.A.) and I used a variation of Leiter's methodology in conducting a citation count study of the faculty in the thirteen graduate tax programs ranked at least once in the U.S. News tax rankings over the past four years (pp. 28-29):

Rank

Graduate Tax Program Faculty

Citations

1

NYU

1917

2

Florida

1181

3

Georgetown

861

4

Miami

799

5

Northwestern

667

6

Boston University

614

7

Loyola-L.A.

475

8

San Diego

377

9

Villanova

177

10

SMU

139

11

Chapman

112

12

U. Washington

75

13

Denver

42

Prior TaxProf Blog coverage:

In our article, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83, 120-22 (2006), Bernie Black (Northwestern) and I examined the Top 25 tax faculty as measured by SSRN downloads, a practice I update monthly on TaxProf Blog.

May 18, 2010 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Scholarship, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

U.S. News Tax Rankings, 2008-2011

U.S. News Logo Following up on yesterday's post, New 2011 U.S. News Tax Rankings:  here are the overall and graduate tax rankings over the past four years:

Overall Tax Rankings (2008-2011):

Ave.

Rank

Tax

Program

2011

Rank

2010

Rank

2009

Rank

2008

Rank

1.00

NYU

1

1

1

1

2.25

Florida

3

2

2

2

2.50

Georgetown

2

2

3

3

4.00

Northwestern

4

4

4

4

5.75

Miami

5

6

6

6

6.00

Harvard

8

5

6

5

7.00

Boston University

6

6

8

8

7.00

UCLA

11

6

5

6

10.00

Virginia

10

11

9

10

10.75

San Diego

6

11

16

10

12.00

Michigan

16

9

10

13

12.25

Stanford

13

10

13

13

12.50

Texas

18

13

10

9

13.50

Loyola-L.A.

9

16

13

16

16.50

Columbia

13

13

19

21

17.75

Denver

12

19

19

21

18.00

SMU

14

19

22

17

Yale

19

10

10

U. Washington

19

15

18

Chicago

21

15

17

Penn

17

19

18

USC

16

22

21

Villanova

21

22

18

Duke

18

15

Boston College

18

23

Chapman

17

UC-Hastings

18

G. Washington

23

Graduate Tax Rankings (2008-2011):

Ave.

Rank

Grad Tax

Program

2011

Rank

2010

Rank

2009

Rank

2008

Rank

1.00

NYU

1

1

1

1

2.25

Florida

3

2

2

2

2.50

Georgetown

2

2

3

3

4.00

Northwestern

4

4

4

4

5.00

Miami

5

5

5

5

5.75

Boston University

6

5

6

6

7.25

San Diego

6

7

9

7

7.75

Loyola-L.A.

8

8

7

8

10.00

SMU

10

10

11

9

10.25

Denver

9

10

10

12

U. Washington

10

8

10

Villanova

11

11

10

Chapman

9


April 21, 2010 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

New 2011 U.S. News Tax Rankings

U.S. News LogoHere are the new 2011 U.S. News Tax Rankings, along with last year's rankings:

2011

Rank

Tax

Program

2010

Rank

1

NYU

1

2

Georgetown

2

3

Florida

3

4

Northwestern

4

5

Miami

6

6

Boston University

6

6

San Diego

11

8

Harvard

5

9

Loyola-L.A.

16

10

Virginia

11

11

UCLA

6

12

Denver

19

13

Stanford

10

14

Columbia

13

14

SMU

19

16

Michigan

9

16

USC

n/r

18

Boston College

23

18

UC-Hastings

n/r

18

Texas

13

21

Chicago

15

21

Villanova

n/r

n/r

Chapman

17

n/r

Pennsylvania

17

n/r

U. Washington

19

n/r

Yale

19

n/r

G. Washington

23

Here are the upward moves from last year in the overall tax rankings:

 

 

Tax

Program

2011

Rank

+7

Loyola-L.A.

9

+7

Denver

12

+5

San Diego

6

+5

SMU

14

+5

Boston College

18

+1

Miami

5

+1

Virginia

10

In addition, USC, UC-Hastings, and Villanova were unranked last year and rank #16, #18, and #21, respectively, this year.

Here are the downward moves from last year in the overall tax rankings:

 

 

Law

School

2011

Rank

-7

Michigan

16

-6

Chicago

21

-5

UCLA

11

-5

Texas

18

-3

Harvard

8

-3

Stanford

13

-1

Florida

3

-1

Columbia

14

In addition, Chapman, Pennsylvania, U. Washington, Yale, and George Washington ranked #17, #17, #19, #19, and #23, respectively, last year and are unranked this year.

Here are the rankings of the graduate tax programs, along with last year's rankings:

2011

Rank

Grad Tax

Program

2010

Rank

1

NYU

1

2

Georgetown

2

3

Florida

2

4

Northwestern

4

5

Miami

5

6

Boston University

5

6

San Diego

7

8

Loyola-L.A.

8

9

Denver

10

10

SMU

10

11

Villanova

n/r

n/r

Chapman

9

n/r

U. Washington

10

This ranking does not include USC, which is launching a graduate tax program in Fall 2011.

Here are the upward moves from last year in the graduate tax rankings:

 

 

Grad Tax

Program

2011

Rank

+1

San Diego

6

+1

Denver

9

In addition, Villanova was unranked last year and ranks #11 this year.

Here are the downward moves from last year in the graduate tax rankings:

 

 

Grad Tax

Program

2011

Rank

-1

Florida

3

-1

Boston Univ.

6

In addition, Chapman and U. Washington ranked #9 and #10, respectively, last year and are unranked this year.

The U.S. News tax survey instrument states that it is intended "to identify the law schools having the top programs in tax law." The survey is sent "to a sample of law school faculty listed in the AALS Directory of Law Teachers 2007-2008 as currently teaching a course or seminar in tax law." Recipients are asked "to [i]dentify up to fifteen (15) schools that have the highest-quality tax law courses or programs. In making your choices consider all elements that contribute to a program's excellence, for example, the depth and breadth of the program, faculty research and publication record, etc."

As Donald Tobin (Ohio State) has noted, it is more than strange that NYU has finished ahead of Florida and Georgetown each year that U.S. News has conducted the survey.  Because the survey ranks the schools by how often they appear on the respondents' "Top 15" lists, this means that some folks list NYU, but not Florida and Georgetown, among the Top 15 tax programs.

April 20, 2010 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Gender, Race, and Age in SSRN Download Rankings

SSRN In our article, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006), Bernie Black and I noted that one of the advantages of SSRN download counts over the other faculty rankings measures (citation counts, publication counts, and reputation surveys) is that SSRN downloads favor younger scholars at improving law schools while the other measures favor more established scholars and schools.  We also noted that women and minorities are under-represented in SSRN download counts as they are in citation counts, publication counts, and reputation surveys, but speculated that the representation of women and minorities would improve in the future as they posted more papers on SSRN, particularly in the recent downloads measure.  We closed the article with case studies of the SSRN download rankings in our respective fields -- corporate and tax law (pp. 120-22).  The SSRN download data were from August 2005.  The chart below compares that data with the most recent tax download data (September 2009) on gender, race, and age:

Top 25

All-Time Downloads

Top 25

Recent Downloads

2005

2009

2005

2009

% Women

16%

20%

20%

39%

% Men

84%

80%

80%

61%

% Minority

8%

4%

0%

0%

% White

92%

96%

100%

100%

Mean Age

47.0

47.6

45.4

46.3

Median Age

47.0

48.0

44.5

47.0

Earlier this year, I asked Why Do Female Tax Profs Do Better in the SSRN Rankings Than Their Nontax Counterparts?.  The representation of women in the Top 25 has increased from 2005 to 2009 in both all-time (4 percentage points) and recent (19) downloads.  However, the representation of minorities has decreased in all-time downloads (4) downloads and has stayed at 0 in recent downloads (based on self reporting in the AALS listing of minority law teachers).

On the age front, Tax Profs in the Top 25 of the SSRN download rankings in both 2005 (all time: 47.0 mean, 47.0 median; recent: 45.4 mean, 44.5 median) and 2009 (all time: 47.6 mean, 48.0 median; recent: 46.3 mean, 47.0 median) are much younger than Tax Profs (55 mean, 54 median) and law professors (53 mean, 52 median) generally.  Eric A. Lustig, Who We Are: An Empirical Study of the Tax Law Professoriate, 1 Pitt. Tax Rev. 85 (2003) (2001 AALS data).  However, the mean and median ages have increased from 2005 to 2009 in both download categories -- all-time (0.6 mean, 1.0 median) and recent (0.9 mean, 2.5 median) downloads.

October 6, 2009 in Legal Education, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings, Tax Prof Rankings, Tax Profs | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

SSRN Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his ranking of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 8/19/09):

 

 

All-Time Downloads

 

Recent Downloads

1

Michigan

26,128

Michigan

6777

2

Harvard

23,955

Illinois

4366

3

Illinois

15,724

UC-Davis

3976

4

Pennsylvania

14,560

Harvard

3285

5

Colorado

13,418

Chicago

2708

6

Chicago

11,882

Loyola-L.A.

2669

7

USC

10,970

Pennsylvania

2381

8

Loyola-L.A.

10,839

Colorado

2377

9

UCLA

10,817

Washburn

2322

10

UC-Davis

9474

Baltimore

2266

11

Columbia

8653

Florida State

2126

12

Boston University

8516

UCLA

1997

13

Florida State

8501

USC

1939

14

Cincinnati

7711

Connecticut

1800

15

Chapman

6341

San Diego

1792

16

Stanford

6247

Chapman

1746

17

NYU

6000

Florida

1644

18

Florida

5518

Pace

1637

19

Washburn

5392

Columbia

1468

20

Baltimore

5164

Boston University

1467

21

Indiana-Bloomington

5012

Case Western

1372

22

Boston College

4638

Notre Dame

1346

23

Notre Dame

4608

Northwestern

1297

24

UC-Berkeley

4463

Texas Tech

1249

25

George Mason

4455

UC-Berkeley

1190

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any full-time law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. Articles co-authored by members of a single faculty are counted only once towards that faculty’s tally.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

September 15, 2009 in Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 23, 2009

New 2010 U.S. News Tax Rankings

Us_news The new 2010 U.S. News Law School Tax Rankings were released today:

  • 1. NYU (#1 last year)
  • 2. Florida (#2)
  • 2. Georgetown (#3)
  • 4. Northwestern (#4)
  • 5. Harvard (#6)
  • 6. Boston University (#8)
  • 6. Miami (#6)
  • 6. UCLA (#5)
  • 9. Michigan (#10)
  • 10. Stanford (#13)
  • 11. San Diego (#16)
  • 11. Virginia (#9)
  • 13. Columbia (#19)
  • 13. Texas (#10)
  • 15. Chicago (#17)
  • 16. Loyola-L.A. (#13)
  • 17. Chapman (unranked)
  • 17. Penn (#19)
  • 19. Denver (#19)
  • 19. SMU (#22)
  • 19. U. Washington (#15)
  • 19. Yale (#10)
  • 23. Boston College (unranked)
  • 23. George Washington (unranked)

The upward moves from last year in the overall tax rankings are:

  • +6 Columbia (#13)
  • +5 San Diego (#11)
  • +3 Stanford (#10)
  • +3 SMU (#19)
  • +2 Boston University (#6)
  • +2 Chicago (#15)
  • +2 Penn (#17)
  • +1 Georgetown (#2)
  • +1 Harvard (#5)
  • +1 Michigan (#9)
  • Chapman, Boston College, and George Washington were unranked last year and rank #17, #23, and #23, respectively, this year

The downward moves from last year in the overall tax rankings are:

  • -9 Yale (#19)
  • -4 U. Washington (#19)
  • -3 Texas (#13)
  • -3 Loyola-L.A. (#16)
  • -2 Virginia (#11)
  • -1 UCLA (#6)
  • Duke, USC, and Villanova ranked #18, #22, and #22, respectively, last year and are unranked this year

Here are the rankings of the graduate tax programs:

  • 1. NYU (#1 last year)
  • 2. Florida (#2)
  • 2. Georgetown (#3)
  • 4. Northwestern (#4)
  • 5. Boston University (#6)
  • 5. Miami (#5)
  • 7. San Diego (#9)
  • 8. Loyola-L.A. (#7)
  • 9. Chapman (unranked)
  • 10. Denver (#10)
  • 10. SMU (#11)
  • 10. U. Washington (#8)

The upward moves from last year in the graduate tax program rankings are:

  • +2 San Diego (#7)
  • +1 Georgetown (#2)
  • +1 Boston University (#5)
  • +1 SMU (#10)
  • Chapman was unranked last year and ranks #9 this year

The downward moves from last year in the graduate tax program rankings are:

  • - 2 U. Washington (#10)
  • - 1 Loyola-L.A. (#8)
  • Villanova was ranked #11 last year and is unranked this year

For the 2009 U.S. News Tax Rankings, see here.

April 23, 2009 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 20, 2009

Early Release of 2010 U.S. News Tax Rankings

Although the 2010 U.S. News Law School Tax Rankings will not be released until Thursday, April 23, the Top 10 list appearing in the magazine has been published on the Internet.  Perhaps the biggest development is Georgetown moving up to #2 (tied with Florida): 

  • 1.  NYU (#1 last year)
  • 2.  Florida (#2)
  • 2.  Georgetown (#3)
  • 4.  Northwestern (#4)
  • 5.  Harvard (#6)
  • 6.  Boston University (#8)
  • 6.  UCLA (#5)
  • 6.  Miami (#6)
  • 9.  Michigan (#10)
  • 10. Stanford (#13)

I will publish the complete Top 25 Tax Rankings when they become available on Thursday (if not earlier).  For the 2009 tax rankings, see here.

Update:  For the release of the full 2010 U.S. News Tax Rankings of the Top 24 schools, see here.

April 20, 2009 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 9/12/08) [click on chart to enlarge]:

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties__4   

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. Articles co-authored by members of a single faculty are counted only once towards that faculty’s tally.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

September 24, 2008 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, December 13, 2007

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 12/6/07) [click on chart to enlarge]:

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_12

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

December 13, 2007 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, August 22, 2007

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 8/1/07):

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_08   

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

August 22, 2007 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, June 28, 2007

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 6/1/07):

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_60 

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. (Lateral transfers due to take effect July 2007 are not yet incorporated.) Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. This month’s tally for Michigan is boosted by the addition of Jim Hines.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

June 28, 2007 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 16, 2007

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 5/1/07):

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_50  

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. (Lateral transfers due to take effect July 2007 are not yet incorporated.) Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. This month’s tally for Michigan is boosted by the addition of Jim Hines.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

May 16, 2007 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 12, 2007

Overall Law Faculty Rankings v. Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_238Brian Leiter (Texas) has posted The Top 15 Most Downloaded Law Faculties, 2006 on our Leiter's Law School Rankings site.  The following chart compares how the overall faculty rankings compare to the tax faculty rankings compiled by Ted Seto (Loyola-L.A.):

Leiter_v_4

[Click on chart to enlarge.]  Note that 7 of the schools comprising the Top 15 Faculties also are among the Top 15 Tax Faculties.

March 12, 2007 in Law School, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 7, 2007

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 3/1/07):   

Ssrn_top_25_tax_faculty_307

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the 2005-2006 AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of 2006-2007 new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. This month’s rankings include several requested additions to the NYU tally, among others.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

March 7, 2007 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 6, 2007

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 2/1/07): 

   

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_207_1

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the 2005-2006 AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of 2006-2007 new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. This month’s rankings include several requested additions to the NYU tally, among others.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

February 6, 2007 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, January 11, 2007

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 1/1/07):      

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_107

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the 2005-2006 AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of 2006-2007 new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. This month’s rankings include several requested additions to the NYU tally, among others.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

January 11, 2007 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, December 7, 2006

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 12/1/06):Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_1206 

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the 2005-2006 AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of 2006-2007 new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. This month’s rankings include several requested additions to the NYU tally, among others.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

December 7, 2006 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, November 8, 2006

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 11/1/06):

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_11_06_p_1

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the 2005-2006 AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of 2006-2007 new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. This month’s rankings include several requested additions to the NYU tally, among others.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

November 8, 2006 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, October 16, 2006

Updated SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 10/1/06):   

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_10_06_p

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the 2005-2006 AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of 2006-2007 new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are also made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

October 16, 2006 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, September 11, 2006

Updated SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 9/1/06):   

Seto_on_the_top_25_tax_faculties_0906_to_1

I’m still working the bugs out of the system. I now have Yariv Brauner back at Florida, not Arizona State. In addition, I’ve added Donald Weidner to Florida State’s tally. These faculty changes account for all of the changes in “all-time downloads.” Otherwise, the “all-time download” rankings are unchanged from last month. “Recent downloads,” of course, are much more of a “What have you done for me lately?” phenomenon.

For more details about Ted's study, see below the fold:

Continue reading

September 11, 2006 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 19, 2006

More on Tax Faculty Rankings

Jim Maule responds to our publication of Ted Seto's second monthly tax faculty rankings (here and here), questioning the usefulness of SSRN downloads as a rankings measure and proposing an alternative ranking based on the number of BNA tax portfolios published by a school's tax faculty.  Here are the top schools under Jim's measure:

  • 1.  Villanova
  • 2.  Iowa State
  • 3.  SMU
  •      Suffolk
  • 5.  Emory
  •     Georgia
  •     Houston
  •     Michigan
  •     Washington & Lee

Although Jim claims that this ranking is "no more or less meaningful than any other tax faculty ranking," I suspect most people would find SSRN's tax faculty ranking more persuasive:

  • 1.  Harvard
  • 2.  UCLA
  • 3.  Penn
  • 4.  USC
  • 5.  Michigan
  • 6.  Columbia

Indeed, SSRN's ranking of law faculties as a whole also seems to identify the right top schools:

  • 1.  Chicago
  • 2.  Harvard
  • 3.  Columbia
  • 4.  Stanford
  • 5.  Texas
  • 6.  UCLA
  • 7.  Yale
  • 8.  Georgetown

Jim is certainly right that SSRN is an incomplete measure, as it includes only a subset of faculty scholarship.  But as I argue in a forthcoming essay in a Yale Law Journal Pocket Part symposium on The Future of Legal Scholarship, the enormous data available on SSRN (3,500 law faculty have posted 11,500 papers on SSRN, which have been downloaded 2.4 million times) provide important insights into the market for legal scholarship.

The answer to SSRN's shortcomings is not to go in the other direction and focus on the offerings of a single publisher.  In our article, What Law Schools Can Learn from Billy Beane and the Oakland Athletics, 82 Tex. L. Rev. 1483, 1533-37 (2004), Rafael Gely and I propose comprehensive and qualitative measurements of faculty scholarly performance:

Given the increasing market demand for more detailed and refined measurements of performance, future studies should provide a comprehensive list of all faculty publications, with the weighting disclosed by the authors and thus capable of further refinement by others. Indeed, we envision a custom-ranking process that allows users to assign their own rankings to the comprehensive data, as is developing now with law school rankings....

The next step in the development of citation count methodologies should extend measurements to include citations to faculty work in books and other forms of scholarship, as well as in judicial opinions, executive branch determinations, and congressional sources....[M]easurements of scholarly impact by citation counts to date consistently have foreshorn any qualitative measures and instead have embraced a strictly numerical approach. But assuming a reliable measure of law review quality can be developed, it may be proper to “count” an article in the #1-ranked journal more than an article of equivalent length in the #180-ranked journal. It also may be appropriate for an extensive discussion of a faculty member’s work in the text of an article to “count” more than a single mention in a string cite in a footnote of an article.

In addition to productivity and citation counts, a more rigorous and systematic use of peer evaluation could provide an alternative measure of individual faculty productivity. The Internet provides a venue for faculty to evaluate each other’s work, not unlike the “book reviews” common on Internet bookstores such as Amazon.com.

I subscribe to Philip Postlewaite's view in Life After Tenure: Where Have All the Articles Gone?, 48 J. Legal Educ. 558, 567 (1998):

[T]he consummate legal academic publishes for the academy (academic articles and university press books), for the profession (professional articles and treatises), and for students (casebooks and student guides). Each constituency is worth addressing, and the vehicles appropriate to the different constituencies are equally legitimate. No constituency and no vehicle of expression should be preferable to the others. All have value.

August 19, 2006 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, August 17, 2006

Updated SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

Ssrn_100Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his monthly rankings of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 8/15/06): 

 

Chart1_1

Due to a misallocation of faculty members, Florida was overcounted last month and Illinois and Arizona State were undercounted. In this month’s rankings, these errors have been corrected. As a result, Florida has dropped and Illinois and Arizona State have risen in the rankings.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006). For more details about Ted's study, see below the fold:

Continue reading

August 17, 2006 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Seto on The Top 25 Tax Faculties

Ssrn_100Seto_2 As regular readers of this blog know, I prepare a weekly ranking of the Top 5 New Tax Papers, as well as a monthly ranking of the Top 25 Tax Professors, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads.  Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has gone a step further and prepared a study for publication here, SSRN Tax Faculty Downloads by Law School and City.  I will share the results of this study over the next three days.

In today's installment, Ted ranks the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 7/1/06):

Top_25_tax_faculties_2

Note: Because of his recent move, Victor Fleischer's downloads are credited to Colorado rather than to UCLA.  Ted's conclusion:

SSRN downloads are, of course, only one measure of scholarly productivity and impact, and scholarship is certainly not the only relevant measure of the quality of a law faculty. With these qualifications, however, it’s pretty clear who comes out on top: UCLA’s tax faculty rocks. (If Louis Kaplow’s non-tax works are excluded, UCLA heads both lists.)

Ted Seto's 3-Part Study of Tax Faculties:

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006). For more details about Ted's study, see below the fold:

Continue reading

July 19, 2006 in Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (3)