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Friday, October 24, 2014

Hoffer, Lederman & Walker Debate Tax Court Exceptionalism Today at Kentucky

HLWStephanie Hoffer (Ohio State), Leandra Lederman (Indiana), and Christopher Walker (Ohio State) debate Tax Court exceptionalism at Kentucky today as part of its Faculty Workshop Series (blogged here):

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October 24, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Talley Presents Corporate Inversions and the Unbundling of Regulatory Competition Today at Virginia

Talley 2Eric Talley (UC-Berkeley) presents Corporate Inversions and the Unbundling of Regulatory Competition at Virginia today as part of its Faculty Workshop Series:

A sizable number of US public companies have recently executed “tax inversions” – acquisitions that move a corporation’s residency abroad while maintaining its listing in domestic securities markets. When appropriately structured, inversions replace American with foreign tax treatment of extraterritorial earnings, often at far lower effective rates. Regulators and politicians have reacted with alarm to the “inversionitis” pandemic, with many championing radical tax reforms. This paper questions the prudence of such extreme reactions, both on practical and on conceptual grounds. Practically, I argue that inversions are simply not a viable strategy for many firms, and thus the ongoing wave may abate naturally (or with only modest tax reforms). Conceptually, I assess the inversion trend through the lens of regulatory competition theory, in which jurisdictions compete not only in tax policy, but also along other dimensions, such as the quality of their corporate law and governance rules. I argue that just as US companies have a strong aversion to high tax rates, they have a strong affinity for strong corporate governance rules, a traditional strength of American corporate law. This affinity has historically given the US enough market power to keep taxes high without chasing off incorporations, because US law specifically bundles tax residency and state corporate law into a conjoined regulatory package. To the extent this market power remains durable, radical tax overhauls would be unhelpful (and even counterproductive). A more blameworthy culprit for inversionitis, I argue, can be found in an unlikely source: Securities Law. Over the last fifteen years, financial regulators have progressively suffused US securities regulations with mandates relating to internal corporate governance matters – traditionally the domain of state law. Those federal mandates, in turn, have displaced and/or preempted state law as a primary source of governance regulation for US-traded issuers. And, because US securities law applies to all listed issuers (regardless of tax residence), this displacement has gradually “unbundled” domestic tax law from corporate governance, eroding the US’s market power in regulatory competition. The most effective elixir for this erosion, then, may also lie in securities regulation. I propose two alternative reform paths: either (a) domestic exchanges should charge listed foreign issuers for their consumption of federal corporate governance policies; or (b) federal law should cede corporate governance back to the states by rolling back many of the governance mandates promulgated over the last fifteen years.

October 24, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Weekly SSRN Tax Roundup

October 24, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Weekly SSRN Roundup | Permalink | Comments (0)

Hickman Reviews Blank's Collateral Compliance

JotwellKristin Hickman (Minnesota), Evaluating the Efficacy of Nonmonetary Penalties (Jotwell) (reviewing Joshua D Blank (NYU), Collateral Compliance, 162 U. Pa. L. Rev. 719 (2014)):

Monetary penalties for noncompliance are a routine feature of the tax laws. The tax literature includes extensive debate over different ways of structuring those penalties to improve tax compliance and eliminate the tax gap. In Collateral Compliance, Josh Blank shifts his gaze beyond that debate to examine what he labels “collateral tax sanctions”—nonmonetary penalties that federal and state governments impose, in addition to the monetary ones, for failing to comply with the tax laws. ...

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October 24, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Cauble: Redefining Qualifying Income for Publicly Traded Partnerships

Tax Analysys Logo (2013)Emily Cauble (DePaul), Redefining Qualifying Income for Publicly Traded Partnerships, 145 Tax Notes 107 (Oct. 6, 2014):

In general, business entities are subject to the section 11 corporate tax if they are publicly traded. Corporate tax is justified under the rationale that entities will pay tax in exchange for access to an established market because liquidity has value. It allows owners of large enterprises to easily exit by selling their shares. Publicly traded partnerships can avoid being subject to corporate tax under current law if they earn primarily qualifying income. The best rationale for this exemption from corporate tax is that the partners could have access to the income of the publicly traded partnership by buying the assets of the partnership directly. Congress should redefine qualifying income to make the definition better fit that rationale by classifying income as qualifying only if it is earned by holding publicly traded stock or other publicly traded assets.

October 24, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Hickman Presents Treasury's Retroactivity Today at UC-Irvine

Hickman 2014 2Kristin Hickman (Minnesota) presents Treasury's Retroactivity at UC-Irvine today as part of its Faculty Workshop Series:

In Bowen v. Georgetown University Hospital, the Supreme Court described retroactivity as "not favored in the law" and generally rejected allowing federal administrative agencies to adopt regulations "altering the past legal consequences of past actions."  Unlike most regulatory agencies, Treasury and the IRS are expressly authorized by Congress to adopt regulations with precisely such primary retroactive effect.  Specifically, IRC § 7805(b) grants Treasury and the IRS the power to backdate tax regulations under a variety of circumstances.  Preliminary analysis shows that Treasury and the IRS utilize this authority regularly with little judicial oversight for abuse of discretion.  Using empirical data, this article will explore more fully Treasury and IRS utilization of the authority to adopt retroactively effective regulations interpreting the Internal Revenue Code.

October 23, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Osofsky: Tax Law Nonenforcement

Leigh Osofsky (Miami), Tax Law Nonenforcement:

The Obama Administration has engaged in what some have characterized as an “unprecedented use of executive power” not to enforce certain laws, including immigration laws, federal marijuana laws, and even parts of the Obama Administration’s own Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. In response to this nonenforcement, commentators have begun asking what would have happened if a President Romney, or a future Republican President, decided not to enforce the tax laws. Could a President decide not to enforce the estate tax, the income tax with respect to millionaires, or the income tax for anyone who has already paid a specified percentage of income in taxes? In answering this question, constitutional scholars have suggested that the President cannot declare categorical, or complete, prospective nonenforcement of some aspect of the law. Recent tax literature examining IRS pronouncements that it will not enforce particular aspects of the tax law has also determined that categorical tax law nonenforcement is troublesome from the perspective of the rule of law.

What has been missing in the existing discussion, especially in the preoccupation with flashy, and relatively infrequent, presidential nonenforcement of the tax law, is a broad based examination of what tax law nonenforcement looks like at the agency level and an accompanying examination of categorical nonenforcement through the lens of the legitimacy of the administrative state.

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October 23, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Mann: Subchapter S: Vive Le Difference!

Roberta F. Mann (Oregon), Subchapter S: Vive Le Difference!, 18 Chapman L. Rev. 65 (2014):

Is Subchapter S obsolete, or does it still serve a rational purpose in the economy? This Article will examine that issue, focusing on the comparison between S corporations and LLCs. The Article begins with a history of Subchapter S and the “check-the-box” regulations. Next, the Article will compare the arguments for and against repealing Subchapter S. Statistics appear to show that the number of S corporation returns is still increasing. Why are S corporations still being used, and do those reasons justify its continued existence? Perhaps the answer is political: politicians love small businesses and S corporation stands for “small business.” Ultimately, the answer to these questions may depend on whether politicians’ favorable view of small business is justified.

October 23, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (1)

Cockfield: BEPS and Global Digital Taxation

Tax Analysys Logo (2013)Arthur J. Cockfield (Queen's University Faculty of Law), BEPS and Global Digital Taxation, 75 Tax Notes Int'l 933 (Sept. 15, 2014):

In 2013, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) launched its base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS) project to inhibit aggressive international tax planning. Action 1 of the BEPS project requires the OECD to identify the main challenges that the digital economy poses for the application of current international tax rules and develop reforms to address these challenges. The article reviews related academic perspectives, and discusses how the digital world facilitates aggressive tax planning. It concludes that any new tax rules should apply broadly and neutrally to substantively similar economic activities from either the digital or traditional commercial world. In addition, the OECD should more carefully examine how Internet technologies can help enforce national tax laws to constrain aggressive planning.

October 23, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Faulhaber: Charitable Giving, Tax Expenditures, and Direct Spending in the US and EU

Lilian Faulhaber (Boston University), Charitable Giving, Tax Expenditures, and the Fiscal Future of the European Union, 39 Yale J. Int'l L. 87 (2014):

This Article compares the ways in which the United States and the European Union limit the ability of state-level entities to subsidize their own residents, whether through direct subsidies or through tax expenditures. It uses four recent charitable giving cases decided by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) to illustrate the ECJ’s evolving tax expenditure jurisprudence and argues that, while this jurisprudence may suggest a new and promising model for fiscal federalism, it may also have negative social policy implications. It also points out that the court analyzes direct spending and tax expenditures under different rubrics despite their economic equivalence and does not provide a clear rule for distinguishing between the two, adding to the confusion of Member States and taxpayers. The Article then surveys the Supreme Court’s Dormant Commerce Clause jurisprudence, under which the Court analyzes discriminatory state spending provisions. The Article concludes that although both the Supreme Court and the ECJ prioritize formalism over economic equivalence, the Supreme Court’s approach to tax expenditures is more defensible than that of the ECJ due to the different federal structures of the two jurisdictions.

October 22, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Mann: The Tax Policy Implications of Economists/Policymakers Miscommunication

Roberta F. Mann (Oregon), Economists are from Mercury, Policymakers are from Saturn: The Tax Policy Implications of Communication Failure, 5 Wm. & Mary Pol'y Rev. 1 (2013):

SaturnPolicymaking lawyers and economists are different types of people who come together in the policymaking realm. Sometimes policymakers rely on economic analysis to make decisions. Sometimes policymakers use economic analysis to support decisions already made. In particular, economic analysis has played a large role in the formation of tax and budgetary policy. However, there is a problem. Not only do economists and lawyers communicate differently, they think, perceive, react and respond differently. They almost seem to be from different planets, speaking different languages. While both lawyers and economists use “stories” to persuade, economic analysis cloaks the story in a complex mathematical model, opaque to those without training in economic theory. The results of economic modeling can obscure the decisions that policymakers and the public need to make — about the direction of the tax system, the nation, and the economy. This article examines the roles economists and lawyers play in the development and implementation of the income tax system. 

October 22, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Osofsky: Concentrated Enforcement

Florida Tax ReviewLeigh Osofsky (Miami), Concentrated Enforcement, 16 Fla. Tax Rev. 325 (2014):

When enforcement resources are limited, how should the scarce enforcement resources be allocated to increase compliance with the law? The answer to this question can determine to what extent the law on the books translates to the law in practice. A dominant school of thought in the tax literature suggests that they should be allocated based on a “worst-first” method, whereby the individuals likely to be most noncompliant are targeted. However, while “worst-first” methods can encourage all individuals to increase compliance so as not to be deemed the “worst,” they can also provide cover to engage in noncompliance that is perceived moderate for the relevant population. This dynamic can become most problematic in highly noncompliant populations. In such populations, existing, high levels of noncompliance, and underlying, structural causes of the high noncompliance can serve as coordinating mechanisms, providing mutual assurance of low compliance. Moreover, “worst-first” theories do not provide a comprehensive explanation for the group and project-based enforcement practices that are found in a number of actual enforcement settings. In response to these deficits, I draw on work from across different disciplines to develop a new theory for the allocation of scarce tax enforcement resources. I suggest that, under certain conditions, deterrence can be enhanced by allocating scarce enforcement resources among a low-compliance population of taxpayers through a process I call concentrated enforcement. After setting forth the theoretical case for concentrated enforcement, I examine how it might apply in the cash business tax sector, a highly noncompliant sector that presents particular challenges for “worst-first” methods. I conclude that concentrated enforcement may increase compliance, meriting its application and empirical evaluation.

October 22, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Willis & Tanzler: ObamaCare Violates the Origination Clause

Steven J. Willis (Florida) & Hans G. Tanzler IV (Florida), ObamaCare Fails the Origination Clause: Why Sissel and Hotze Should Be Reversed:

ObamaCare 2The Affordable Care Act violates the Constitution's Origination Clause: Article One, Section 7. What began as House Bill 3590 was not a "bill for Raising Revenue" because it solely covered non-taxes: spending items such as credits and recapture exclusions. Further, the Senate amendment adding I.R.C. section 5000A - the tax for lacking health insurance - was not germane to the House Bill; however, the amendment was indeed a "bill for Raising revenue" that must originate in the House.

The D.C. Circuit - in Sissel - and the District Court - in Hotze - each used a mistaken "primary purpose" test to overcome an Origination Clause challenge. Both Courts mistakenly focused on the "primary purpose" of the Affordable Care Act, rather than the purpose of the isolated section 5000A tax. As the Supreme Court in Rainey (1914) and Flint (1911) demonstrated, an Origination Clause challenge must examine the individual provision of the Act on its own merits as to germaneness and revenue raising, rather than as compared to the Act as a whole.

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October 22, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Blank Presents Reconsidering Corporate Tax Privacy Today at UNLV

BlankJoshua D. Blank (NYU) presents Reconsidering Corporate Tax Privacy, 11 N.Y.U. J. L. & Bus. ___ (2014), at UNLV today as part of its Faculty Enrichmant Series:

For over a century, politicians, government officials and scholars in the United States have debated whether corporate tax returns, which are currently subject to broad tax privacy protections, should be publicly accessible. The ongoing global discussion of base erosion and profit shifting by multinational corporations has generated calls for greater tax transparency. Throughout this debate, participants have focused exclusively on the potential reactions of a corporation’s managers, shareholders and consumers to a corporation’s disclosure of its own tax return information. There is, however, another perspective: how would the ability of a corporation’s stakeholders and agents to observe other corporations’ tax return information affect the corporation’s compliance with the tax law?

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October 21, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Marian: A Conceptual Framework for the Regulation of Cryptocurrencies

Omri Y. Marian (Florida), A Conceptual Framework for the Regulation of Cryptocurrencies, 81 U. Chi. L. Rev. Dialogue ___ (2015):

BitcoinThis Essay proposes a conceptual framework for the regulation of transactions involving cryptocurrencies. Cryptocurrencies offer tremendous opportunities for innovation and development, but at the same time are uniquely suited to facilitate illicit behavior. The suggested regulatory framework is intended to support (or, at the least, not impair) cryptocurrencies’ innovative potential. At the same time, the aim is to disrupt cryptocurrencies’ utility for criminal activities. To achieve such purposes, this Essay suggests a regulatory framework that imposes costs on the characteristics of cryptocurrencies that make them particularly useful for criminal behavior (in particular, anonymity), but does not impose costs on characteristics that are at the core of the generative potential (in particular, the decentralization of value-transfer processes). Using a basic utility model of criminal behavior as a benchmark, the Essay explains how regulatory instruments can be so designed. One such regulatory instrument is proposed as an example – an elective anonymity tax on cryptocurrency transactions in which at least one party is not anonymous.

October 21, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Osofsky: Unwinding the Ceiling Rule

Leigh Osofsky (Miami), Unwinding the Ceiling Rule, 33 Va. Tax Rev. 63 (2014):

As is widely known, the so-called “ceiling rule,” which applies under the traditional method for section 704(c) allocations, can create the wrong tax result. Specifically, the ceiling rule can result in misallocations of income, gain, loss, and deduction to both a partner contributing property and to the noncontributing partners. Notwithstanding these predictable misallocations, the Treasury Department still permits application of the ceiling rule under section 704(c). This Article challenges longstanding assumptions regarding the operation of the ceiling rule in the context of section 704(c). Historically, Congress and partnership tax experts assumed that the ceiling rule is perfectly unwound on liquidation or sale of a partnership interest. This assumption still operates to some extent today. The assumption glosses over a significantly more complicated reality. This Article closely examines the history of section 704(c) and the interaction between the ceiling rule and the rules regarding sales and liquidations of partnership interests. Doing so reveals that when and to what extent the perfect unwinding assumption holds depends (perhaps to a surprising degree) on (1) a variety of relatively arbitrary facts regarding the assets held by the partnership on liquidation or sale, and (2) the unintended interactions of inordinately complicated partnership tax rules. In reaching this conclusion, this Article displays that the ceiling rule, which has always been part of the section 704(c) regime, is even worse than it is commonly thought to be.

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October 21, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Johnson: Repatriation Tax -- Are We Churchill or Chamberlain?

Tax Analysys Logo (2013)Calvin H. Johnson (Texas), Repatriation Tax: Are We Churchill or Chamberlain?, 144 Tax Notes 1459 (Sept. 22, 2014):

Under current law, earnings of a foreign subsidiary are not subject to tax until they are repatriated. At repatriation, the U.S. parent pays 35% corporate tax, less foreign tax credits. A tax on repatriation has no effect on repatriations, by mathematical law, if the tax remains. If the United States reduces or forgives the tax in the foreseeable future, U.S. corporations will delay repatriation to take advantage of the reduction. This project proposes an increase in tax on repatriation after a short window during which the 35% tax, less foreign tax credits, will remain. The increase will induce corporations to repatriate their foreign earnings within the window to take advantage of the relatively generous 35% rate.

October 21, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, October 20, 2014

Sanchirico Presents International Tax and Ownership Nationality Today at Northwestern

SanchiricoChris Sanchirico (Pennsylvania) presents As American as Apple, Inc.: International Tax and Ownership Nationality, 68 Tax L. Rev. ___ (2014), at Northwestern today as part of its Law and Economics Workshop Series organized by Bernard Black:

The ownership nationality of large US multinational companies plays an implicit but important role in the current debate over how such companies should be taxed. This paper identifies that role and investigates what is actually known about where these companies’ shareholders reside.

October 20, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Heath Presents Taxation as Collective Consumption Today at McGill

HeathJoseph Heath (Toronto) presents Taxation as Collective Consumption? at McGill today as part of its Spiegel Sohmer Tax Policy Colloquium Series hosted by Allison Christians and Daniel Weinstock:

Individuals express a surprisingly pervasive error that I refer to as the “government as consumer” fallacy. The picture underlying this fallacy is relatively straightforward. Government services, such as health care, education, national defense, and so on, “cost” us as a society. We are able to pay for them only because of all the wealth that we generate in the private sector, which we transfer to the government in the form of taxes. A government that taxes the economy too heavily stands accused of “killing the goose that lays the golden eggs” by disrupting the mechanism that generates the wealth that it itself relies upon in order to provides its services.

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October 20, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Dharmapala Presents Interest Deductions in a Multijurisdictional World Today at Loyola-L.A.

DharmapalaDhammika Dharmapala (Chicago) presents ​Interest Deductions in a Multijurisdictional World at Loyola-L.A. today as part of its Tax Policy Colloquium Series:

The tax treatment of interest expenses in a multijurisdictional setting raises numerous complexities. This paper catalogs these difficulties and highlights the particular problems associated with efforts to achieve ownership neutrality among multinational corporations (MNCs) when debt financing is available. We argue that the differential deductibility of debt entailed by various current tax law provisions leads in general to potential distortions in the patterns of asset ownership across MNCs, and that various proposed solutions have significant limitations. We suggest several alternative regimes to address both the ownership distortions that we highlight, as well as other well-established problems of income-shifting through debt. These alternative regimes are extensions to a multinational setting of two general approaches to the neutral treatment of interest expenses - the CBIT (comprehensive business income tax) and ACC (allowance for corporate capital). These regimes – a worldwide debt cap (WDC) and a net financing deduction (NFD) – provide solutions to income-shifting and ownership distortions. However, they have the potential disadvantage of restricting other policy parameters.

Alexander Wu (UCLA) is the commentator.

October 20, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Frye: Crowdfunding as a Solution to the Inefficiency of the Charitable Deduction

Brian L. Frye (Kentucky), Solving Charity Failures, 93 Or. L. Rev. 155 (2014):

Kickstarter Logo“Crowdfunding” is a way of using the Internet to raise money by asking the public to contribute to a project. This Article argues that crowdfunding has succeeded, at least in part, because it makes charitable giving more efficient by solving certain “charity failures,” or inefficiencies created by the inability of the charitable contribution deduction to subsidize the charitable giving from low-income donors. The economic subsidy theory of the charitable contribution deduction explains that the deduction is justified because it solves market failures and government failures in charitable goods. According to this theory, free riding causes market failures in charitable goods, and majoritarianism causes government failures in charitable goods. The charitable contribution deduction solves these market and government failures by indirectly subsidizing charitable contributions, thereby compensating for free riding and avoiding majoritarianism. Crowdfunding is successful because it provides a technological solution to some of those charity failures. While the charitable contribution deduction causes charity failures because the deduction cannot subsidize contributions from low-income donors, crowdfunding can subsidize those contributions by offering rewards instead. As a result, crowdfunding should solve at least some of the charity failures caused by the deduction through providing an incentive for low-income donors to contribute. The remarkable success of crowdfunding suggests that the inefficiency associated with charity failures is quite large.

October 20, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, October 19, 2014

L.A. Times: Ed Kleinbard's We Are Better Than This Is 'Moral and Farsighted'

Los Angeles Times:  On Fiscal Policy, USC Professor's Viewpoint is Moral and Farsighted, by Michael Hiltzik:

We Are Better Than This (2014)The left sees me as a Wall Street Journal Satanist, and the right as a stealth Marxian bent on destroying free enterprise," Edward D. Kleinbard was saying.

The USC law professor was referring to the reactions elicited by his recent op-ed in the New York Times, in which he asserted that the solution to economic inequality in the U.S. was not to make the tax system more progressive — it's already "the most progressive in the developed world," he wrote — but to make it bigger.

As he explained when we met last week at USC's Gould School of Law, where he has taught tax law since 2009, that would render the entire fiscal system more progressive, because it would fund more spending. Government spending is always progressive, benefiting middle- and lower-income people more than the wealthy. So: If you want to reduce inequality, expanding government is more effective than merely increasing the relative burden on the rich.

One can see why left and right alike felt that their shibboleths were being skewered.

But Kleinbard's viewpoint is both moral and farsighted. It's also an important theme of his newly published book, We Are Better Than This: How Government Should Spend Our Money.

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October 19, 2014 in Book Club, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (1)

Top 5 Tax Paper Downloads

SSRN LogoThere is quite a bit of movement in this week's list of the Top 5 Recent Tax Paper Downloads on SSRN, with new papers debuting on the list at #2 and #5:

  1. [338 Downloads]  2013 Developments in Connecticut Estate and Probate Law, by Jeffrey A. Cooper (Quinnipiac) & John R. Ivimey (Reid and Riege, Hartford)
  2. [236 Downloads]  Trying Times 2014: Important Lessons to Be Learned from Recent Federal Tax Cases, by Nancy A. McLaughlin (Utah) & Steven J. Small ( Law Office of Stephen J. Small, Newton, MA)
  3. [139 Downloads]  Rights Without Remedies, by Matthew L. M. Fletcher (Michigan State)
  4. [138 Downloads]  Home-Country Effects of Corporate Inversions, by Omri Y. Marian (Florida)
  5. [136 Downloads]  'Show Me the Money!' -- Analyzing the Potential State Tax Implications of Paying Student-Athletes, by Kathryn Kisska-Schulze (North Carolina A&T) & Adam Epstein (Central Michigan)

October 19, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Top 5 Downloads | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 17, 2014

Open Access Legal Scholarship Is Cited 60% More in Law Review Articles, 40% More in Judicial Opinions

James Donovan (Kentucky), Carol Watson (Georgia) & Caroline Osborne (Washington & Lee), The Open Access Advantage for American Law Reviews:

Open AccessOpen access legal scholarship generates a prolific discussion, but few empirical details have been available to describe the scholarly impact of providing unrestricted access to law review articles. The present project fills this gap with specific findings on what authors and institutions can expect.

Articles available in open access formats enjoy an advantage in citation by subsequent law review works of 53%. For every two citations an article would otherwise receive, it can expect a third when made freely available on the Internet. This benefit is not uniformly spread through the law school tiers. Higher tier journals experience a lower OA advantage (11.4%) due to the attention such prestigious works routinely receive regardless of the format. When focusing on the availability of new scholarship, as compared to creating retrospective collections, the aggregated advantage rises to 60.2%. While the first tier advantage rises to 16.8%, the mid-tiers skyrocket to 89.7%. The fourth tier OA advantage comes in at 81.2%.

Figure 5

Citations of legal articles by courts is similarly impacted by OA availability. While the 15-year aggregate advantage is a mere 9.5%, new scholarship is 41.4% more likely to be cited by a court decision if it is available in open access format.

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October 17, 2014 in Legal Education, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Weekly SSRN Tax Roundup

October 17, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Weekly SSRN Roundup | Permalink | Comments (0)

Weekly Student Tax Note Roundup

October 17, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Weekly Student Tax Note Roundup | Permalink | Comments (0)

ATPI Hosts Conference Today on Taxation and Migration

ATPI Logo (2015)The American Tax Policy Institute hosts a conference today on Taxation and Migration organized by Reuven Avi-Yonah (Michigan) and Joel Slemrod (Michigan) in Washington, D.C.:

The conference assesses the effects of taxation on the migration across national and state boundaries of individuals at various stages of their lives. It will also evaluate whether corporate migrations (such as "inversions") involve migration of individuals, and what are the tax policy implications for the US and other jurisdictions. 

October 17, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

62nd Annual Montana Tax Institute

62The 62nd Annual Montana Tax Institute kicks off today:

  • Jonathan Blattmachr (ILS Management), Asset Protection and Related Tax Consequences
  • Jessica Browde (Montana), Professional Responsibility in Tax Practice: Circular 230 Update
  • Martin Burke (Montana) & Michael Friel (Florida), Income in Respect of a Decedent: Section 691
  • Sam Donaldson (Georgia State), Annual Federal Income Tax Update
  • Elaine Gagliardi (Montana), Annual Wealth Transfer Tax Update
  • Kristen Juras (Montana), Limitations of Activities of Nonprofit Organizations
  • Roberta Mann (Oregon), Earth, Wind and Fire: Comparing the Taxation of Energy Sources
  • Nancy McLaughlin (Utah), Conservation Easements: Contemporary Issues and Challenges
  • Martin McMahon (Florida), Corporate and Partnership Tax Recent Developments
  • Daniel Simmons (UC-Davis), Impact of Partner and Partnership Liabilities under Subchapter K
  • Chris Treharne, (Gibraltar Business Appraisals), Justifying Discounts for Farm and Ranch Minority Ownership Interests

October 17, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Virginia Tax Review Publishes New Issue

Virginia Tax Review (2014)The Virginia Tax Review has published Vol. 33, No. 4 (Spring 2014):

October 16, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Cauble: Relying on the IRS

Emily Cauble (DePaul), Relying on the IRS:

The IRS issues different types of guidance to taxpayers, and the extent to which taxpayers can rely on IRS guidance depends on the form in which it was offered. For instance, taxpayers generally cannot rely on oral advice provided over the phone but can rely on more formal types of advice. The current state of the law harms unsophisticated taxpayers who disproportionately obtain informal advice -- the least reliable type of IRS guidance.

Existing literature lacks a thorough discussion of why, as a policy matter, we allow taxpayers to rely on some forms of IRS guidance more than others. This Article fills that gap by suggesting and critically evaluating potential justifications for this practice.

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October 16, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

A Case for Simpler Gain Bifurcation for Real Estate Developers

Florida Tax ReviewBradley T. Borden (Brooklyn), Nathan Brown (Proskauer Rose, Boca Raton) & John Wagner II (Williams Parker Harrison Dietz & Getzen, Sarasota), A Case for Simpler Gain Bifurcation for Real Estate Developers, 15 Fla Tax Rev. 279 (2014):

This Article examines the judicially-sanctioned bifurcation of real estate developers’ gain. The Article recognizes that even though some commentators oppose granting favorable tax treatment to capital gains, the law most likely will not change. With that in mind, the Article examines the all-or-nothing approach of characterizing gain from the sale of real estate as either capital gain or ordinary income. The Article rejects the all-or-nothing approach of characterizing income under the current statutory system. Instead, it embraces gain bifurcation in the second-best setting that taxes capital gains and ordinary income differently. Illustrating the policy justification for gain bifurcation and judicially-sanctioned bifurcation structures, the Article recommends that lawmakers should more fully embrace gain bifurcation for real estate developers by creating a simple statutory election for bifurcating gain that would enhance equity, accuracy, and transparency of gain bifurcation. Although the Article limits its analysis to real estate developers, the idea of gain bifurcation, once improved in this area, could be a catalyst for exploring bifurcation in other areas.

October 16, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Dharmapala: Base Erosion and Profit Shifting -- A Simple Conceptual Framework

Dhammika Dharmapala (Chicago), Base Erosion and Profit Shifting: A Simple Conceptual Framework:

BEPSThe issue of tax-motivated income shifting within multinational firms – or “base erosion and profit shifting” (BEPS) – has attracted increasing global attention and has become the subject of an ongoing OECD initiative. This paper provides a simple conceptual framework that helps to clarify aspects of governments’ responses to the BEPS phenomenon and the potential role of the OECD initiative. An important implication of this framework is that multilateral cooperation of the type envisaged in the BEPS initiative has the potential to reduce the deadweight costs of MNCs’ tax planning and compliance activities, thereby enhancing global welfare. 

October 16, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Penalizing Tax Petitions: Why the Erroneous Refund Penalty in § 6676 Violates Taxpayers’ First Amendment Rights

Derek T. Ho & Christopher Klimmek (both of Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel, Washington, D.C.), Penalizing Tax Petitions: Why the Erroneous Refund Penalty in Code § 6676 Violates Taxpayers’ First Amendment Rights, 68 Tax Law. ___ (2015):

In 2007, Congress enacted the so-called “erroneous refund penalty,” which imposes a 20% penalty on any taxpayer who submits a claim for tax refund that the IRS deems “inaccurate,” even if the taxpayer’s position is legally non-frivolous and asserted in good faith. In part because the IRS has rarely imposed the penalty since its enactment, the statute has thus far not been analyzed extensively by legal scholars or policymakers. However, the penalty continues to impose a significant chilling effect on tax refund claims, and the Treasury Department has now signaled the possibility of more aggressive application in the future. This article argues that the erroneous refund penalty is unconstitutional under the Petition Clause of the First Amendment. Penalizing taxpayers financially for asking their government to return money they believe is legally theirs strikes at the heart of the Petition Clause’s protections. Indeed, protecting citizens’ right to complain about abusive taxation by the national Government was one of the Framers’ core motivations for enacting the First Amendment. The article draws on the history of the First Amendment, the Supreme Court’s Petition Clause jurisprudence, and recent lower court decisions in exposing the constitutional infirmity of the penalty. The article also explains that the erroneous refund penalty is unjustified as a matter of tax policy, because it fails to promote voluntary compliance, is irrationally harsh and unfair to taxpayers, and is not necessary to solve the narrow, targeted problems that Congress intended to address in enacting the statute. Finally, the article suggests ways in which the penalty could be amended, if it is not repealed altogether, to avoid infringing on taxpayers’ First Amendment rights and ensure that refund claims are treated fairly.

October 16, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Symposium: Expanding the Boundaries of Legal Education

On TaskSymposium, On Task? Expanding the Boundaries of Legal Education, 65 S.C. L. Rev. 519-638 (2014) (Video):

October 16, 2014 in Legal Education, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Afield: A Market for Tax Compliance

W. Edward Afield III (Ave Maria), A Market for Tax Compliance, 62 Clev. St. L. Rev. 315 (2014):

It is becoming increasingly clear that, due to political realities and budgetary constraints, the IRS is going to have to attempt to enforce the tax laws by doing more with less. Current enforcement efforts have yielded a tax gap (i.e., the difference between the amount of taxes that should be paid and the amount that are collected) of roughly $450 billion annually. Faced with this task, one of the steps that the IRS has recently taken is to try to improve the quality in services performed by paid tax preparers, a group that historically has been subject to little IRS regulation or monitoring but that continues to play an increasingly important role in the tax system.

Although the IRS’s recent efforts to better regulate paid preparers is a good step in improving the quality of tax services, its current structure as a mandatory regulatory regime causes it to miss a number of compliance oriented advantages that could be achieved through a voluntary system of tax preparer regulation in which tax preparers could choose to seek certifications indicating whether they had a positive track record of compliance.

This paper explores in detail for the first time in the literature how preparer regulation could achieve significantly more compliance gains if it were structured as a voluntary system designed to create a market that rewards tax compliance.

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October 16, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Borden Presents REIT Stuff at Florida

BordenBradley T. Borden (Brooklyn) presented REIT Stuff at Florida as part of its Graduate Tax Program Colloquium Series:

Real estate investment trusts (REITs) have made headlines recently because they provide favorable tax treatment to corporations that primarily own real estate, which contrasts with the typical double-tax that generally applies to corporations. The media appears to be particularly concerned that existing corporations are spinning off their real estate holdings into REITs, eroding the corporate tax base. It is also concerned that the IRS has extended REIT classification to entities that hold property, such as telecommunications equipment, billboards, mortgages, oil and gas pipeline systems, timber, casinos, and data centers, which do not fit within the traditional definition of real estate. Such extension broadens the scope of favorable REIT tax treatment to property that was not held in real estate trusts when Congress enacted the REIT regime. Despite all of this attention, the effect of REIT spinoffs and the formation of REITs with non-traditional real estate assets may not have a very significant effect on federal tax revenues. This Article will closely examine the revenue effect of REIT spinoffs and the extension of REIT treatment to non-traditional real estate assets. Early work in this are suggests that the revenue effect appears to be nominal, and it is a result of dual, overlapping tax policies—favorable tax treatment of real estate and tax-exempt status for retirement plans. The analysis will set the stage for discussing potential action in this area by recounting the history of REITs and the important events that have directed the course of REIT legislation to its current status. The early analysis appears to suggest that lawmakers should either reconsider the preference for real estate and pensions or consider relaxing the law to provide more efficient ways for corporations to bifurcate real-estate income from operating income and more easily obtain the benefits available under current law.

October 15, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Need for a Patent Box Tax Regime to Encourage Domestic Manufacturing

Bernard Knight (Partner, McDermott, Will & Emery, Washington, D.C.) & Goud Maragani (Senior Counsel, USPTO), It Is Time for the United States to Implement a Patent Box Tax Regime to Encourage Domestic Manufacturing, 19 Stan. J.L. Bus. & Fin. 39 (2013):

In order to curb the outsourcing of industries and jobs, the United States must provide better incentives to encourage manufacturers to operate domestically. The United States is at a strategic disadvantage vis-à-vis many other industrialized nations that attract industry and jobs by taxing income from intellectual property sourced in those countries at a lower tax rate. This Article suggests that the United States should consider a patent box regime and outlines the benefits that such a regime should produce in terms of additional domestic manufacturing and job creation. The Article begins by discussing scholarly work that explores the link between domestic manufacturing and research and development, and explains why domestic manufacturing is critical to innovation. In turn, innovation leads to more productivity, higher paying jobs and lower unemployment. The next Section summarizes the significant features of the existing patent box tax regimes in certain European Union nations and China. Taking into account the positive attributes and deficiencies of the existing patent box regimes, the Article concludes by suggesting features that should be considered for inclusion in a U.S. patent box regime.

October 15, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Deadline Today: Call for Tax Papers and Panels for 2015 Law & Society Annual Meeting

SeattleToday is the deadline for Neil Buchanan's call for tax papers and panels for next year's annual meeting of the Law & Society Association in Seattle (May 28-31, 2015):

For the eleventh consecutive year, I will organize sessions for the the Law, Society, and Taxation group (Collaborative Research Network 31).

Although there is an official call for papers, please remember that you are not bound by the official theme of the conference.  I will give full consideration to proposals in any area of tax law, tax policy, distributive justice, interdisciplinary approaches to tax issues, and so on.

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October 15, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

SSRN Tax Professor Rankings

SSRN LogoSSRN has updated its monthly rankings of 944 American and international law school faculties and 3,000 law professors by (among other things) the number of paper downloads from the SSRN database.  Here is the new list (through October 1, 2014) of the Top 25 U.S. Tax Professors in two of the SSRN categories: all-time downloads and recent downloads (within the past 12 months):

 

 

All-Time

 

Recent

1

Reuven Avi-Yonah (Mich.)

40,434

Reuven Avi-Yonah (Mich.)

6677

2

Paul Caron (Pepperdine)

26,751

Ed Kleinbard (USC)

5005

3

Louis Kaplow (Harvard)

23,022

Richard Ainsworth (BU)

2688

4

D. Dharmapala (Chicago)

20,615

D. Dharmapala (Chicago) 

2630

5

Vic Fleischer (San Diego)

20,156

Paul Caron (Pepperdine)

2624

6

James Hines (Michigan)

19,969

Robert Sitkoff (Harvard)

2051

7

Ted Seto (Loyola-L.A.)

19,266

Omri Marian (Florida)

1986

8

Richard Kaplan (Illinois)

19.122

Richard Kaplan (Illinois)

1901

9

Ed Kleinbard (USC)

16,472

Katie Pratt (Loyola-L.A.)

1824

10

Katie Pratt (Loyola-L.A.)

16,334

Bridget Crawford (Pace)

1626

11

Dennis Ventry (UC-Davis)

15,417

Jen Kowal (Loyola-L.A.)

1583

12

Carter Bishop (Suffolk)

15,230

Brad Borden (Brooklyn.)

1578

13

Jen Kowal (Loyola-L.A.)

14,568

David Gamage (UCBerkeley)

1509

14

David Weisbach (Chicago)

14,483

Jeff Kwall (Loyola-Chicago)

1502

15

Chris Sanchirico (Penn)

14,317

Louis Kaplow (Harvard)

1457

16

Richard Ainsworth (BU)

14,260

James Hines (Michigan)

1421

17

Robert Sitkoff (Harvard)

14,168

Francine Lipman (UNLV)

1390

18

Francine Lipman (UNLV)

14,009

Dan Shaviro (NYU)

1376

19

Brad Borden (Brooklyn)

13.974

Dick Harvey (Villanova)

1343

20

David Walker (Boston Univ.)

13,965

Vic Fleischer (San Diego)

1308

21

Bridget Crawford (Pace)

13,955

Ted Seto (Loyola-L.A.)

1292

22

Herwig Schlunk (Vanderbilt)

12,527

Carter Bishop (Suffolk)

1252

23

Dan Shaviro (NYU)

12,171

David Weisbach (Chicago)

1176

24

Ed McCaffery (USC)

11,771

Gregg Polsky (North Carolina)

1156

25

Wendy Gerzog (Baltimore)

11,759

Chris Sanchirico (Penn)

1151

Note that this ranking includes full-time tax professors with at least one tax paper on SSRN, and all papers (including non-tax papers) by these tax professors are included in the SSRN data.

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October 15, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Tax Prof Rankings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Fleischer Presents Curb Your Enthusiasm for Pigouvian Taxes Today at Columbia

Fleischer Vic (2013)Victor Fleischer (San Diego) presents Curb Your Enthusiasm for Pigouvian Taxes at Columbia today as part of its Tax Policy Colloquium Series hosted by Alex RaskolnikovDavid Schizer, and Wojciech Kopczuk:

Pigouvian (or "corrective") taxes have been proposed or enacted on dozens of products and activities that may be harmful in excess: carbon, gasoline, fat, sugar, guns, cigarettes, alcohol, traffic, zoning, executive pay, and financial transactions, among others. Academics of all political stripes are mystified by the public’s inability to see the merits of using Pigouvian taxes more frequently to address serious social harms.

This enthusiasm for Pigouvian taxes should be tempered. A Pigouvian tax is easy to design — as a uniform excise tax — if one assumes that each individual causes the same amount of harm with each incremental increase in activity on the margin. This assumption of uniform marginal social cost pairs well with the limited information and enforcement capacity of tax institutions. But when marginal social cost varies significantly, a Pigouvian tax will not lead to an optimal allocation of economic resources. Focusing on carbon emissions, where the assumption of uniform marginal social cost happens to be reasonable, obscures this common design flaw.

Broadly speaking, Pigouvian taxes should be employed only when (1) the harm is (or is properly analogized to) global pollution, and where the harm does not vary based on the source, or (2) the variation in marginal social cost is easily observed and categorized, as with traffic congestion charges.

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October 14, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Fleischer: Charitable Giving and Utilitarianism

Miranda Perry Fleischer (San Diego), Charitable Giving and Utilitarianism: Problems and Priorities, 89 Ind. L.J. 1484 (2014):

Charitable giving is redistributive at heart. It is thus surprising that scholarship on the charitable tax subsidies focuses on the efficient and pluralistic production of public goods while largely ignoring distributive justice concerns. Existing scholarship and current law leave crucial questions unanswered: How should we prioritize among charities? Should subsidized groups be required to help the poor? Are criticisms that charities do too little to help the poor valid? This Article is part of a series that examines how each common theory of distributive justice would answer these questions.

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October 14, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Law Faculty Rankings Should Focus More on Non-Academic Influence

Patrick Arthur Woods, Stop Counting (Or At Least Count Better):

For American legal scholarship to fulfill its purpose, it must have an impact on the development of the actual law as it is enacted and interpreted in the United States. However, legal scholarship broadly — and law review articles in particular — has become less influential on judges and members of the practicing bar over time. This short essay argues that the decline is partly attributable to the open reliance on metrics that primarily represent influence within the legal academy when measuring the value of a scholar’s work. In particular, I argue that a focus on metrics with only a tenuous connection to non-academic usage of a new scholar’s work, such as download counts, law journal citation count-based rankings methodologies, and article placement, incentivizes new legal writers to write for other academics rather than for judges, attorneys in practice, or policy-makers.

October 14, 2014 in Law School Rankings, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (3)

Call for Papers: University of North Carolina Tax Symposium

North Carolina Tax SymposiumThe University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler School of Business has issued a call for papers for its Eighteenth Annual Tax Symposium to be held April 10-11, 2015. The symposium "is designed to bring together leading tax scholars from economics, accounting, finance, law, political science, and related fields." The deadline for the call for papers is January 1, 2015:

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October 14, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thimmesch: The Tax Hangover -- Trailing Nexus

Tax Analysys Logo (2013)Adam B. Thimmesch (Nebraska), Evaluating the Tax Hangover: Trailing Nexus, 74 State Tax Notes 83 (Oct. 13, 2014):

In this article, which is adapted from a longer law review article [The Tax Hangover: Trailing Nexus, 33 Va. Tax Rev. 497 (2014)], Thimmesch examines the concept of trailing nexus. He argues that the concept is consistent with the physical presence standard and proposes an economic latency approach, which he asserts is consistent with both constitutional principles and economic reality.

October 14, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Tax Analysts | Permalink | Comments (0)

Symposium on the Work of Larry Ribstein: Unlocking the Law

Ribstein 2Symposium, Unlocking the Law: Building on the Work of Professor Larry E. Ribstein, 38 Int'l Rev. L. & Econ. 1-173 (2014):

October 14, 2014 in Conferences, Legal Education, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 13, 2014

Sanchirico Presents International Tax and Ownership Nationality Today at Florida

SanchiricoChris Sanchirico (Pennsylvania) presents As American as Apple, Inc.: International Tax and Ownership Nationality, 68 Tax L. Rev. ___ (2014), at Florida today as part of its Graduate Tax Program Colloquium Series:

The ownership nationality of large US multinational companies plays an implicit but important role in the current debate over how such companies should be taxed. This paper identifies that role and investigates what is actually known about where these companies’ shareholders reside.

October 13, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Mayer Presents Taxing Politics Today at Loyola-L.A.

MayerLloyd Hitoshi Mayer (Notre Dame) presents Taxing Politics at Loyola-L.A. today as part of its Tax Policy Colloquium Series:

This draft Article addresses two key questions relating to the interaction between federal tax law and political activity. First, is it advisable as a policy matter for Congress to use the tax law to regulate the flows of money in politics in furtherance of non-tax goals such as combatting corruption, promoting equality, and encouraging democratic participation? I answer this first question generally no, in significant part because the tax law and the IRS are poorly suited for this role and suffer significant collateral damage when their poor fit becomes evident, as the ongoing controversy over the IRS’ handling of exemption applications filed by Tea Party and other conservative groups reveals. Second, does tax law in its current form treat political activity properly based on longstanding tax policies relating to what constitutes income, what expenses should be deductible, what constitutes a taxable gift, and what characteristics organizations should have in order to qualify for tax exemption? I answer this second question generally yes, but identify several areas where the tax law needs to be changed to achieve greater consistency with such policies, including with respect to reducing the amount of political activity that is deemed permissible for most types of tax-exempt organizations.

Ellen Aprill (Loyola-L.A.) and Justin Levitt (Loyola-L.A.) are the commentators.

October 13, 2014 in Colloquia, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Christians: It's Time to Fix FBAR

Tax Analysys Logo (2013)Allison Christians (McGill), Paperwork and Punishment: It's Time to Fix FBAR, 76 Tax Notes Int'l 147 (Oct. 13, 2014):

Allison Christians argues that the U.S. Foreign Bank Account Report regime is excessive and offers suggestions to narrow its scope and ease compliance burdens.

October 13, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Tax Analysts | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Top 5 Tax Paper Downloads

SSRN LogoThere is a bit of movement in this week's list of the Top 5 Recent Tax Paper Downloads on SSRN, with a new paper debuting on the list at #5.  The #1 paper is now #19 in all-time downloads among 10,386 tax papers:

  1. [3288 Downloads]  'Competitiveness' Has Nothing to Do with it, by Edward D. Kleinbard (USC)
  2. [336 Downloads]  2013 Developments in Connecticut Estate and Probate Law, by Jeffrey A. Cooper (Quinnipiac) & John R. Ivimey (Reid and Riege, Hartford)
  3. [219 Downloads]  The OECD'S Flawed and Dated Approach to Computer Servers Creating Permanent Establishments, by Monica Gianni (Florida)
  4. [131 Downloads]  Rights Without Remedies, by Matthew L. M. Fletcher (Michigan State)
  5. [126 Downloads]  Home-Country Effects of Corporate Inversions, by Omri Y. Marian (Florida)

October 12, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Top 5 Downloads | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Ryan: Valuation Lessons From Estate of Adell

Tax Analysys Logo (2013)Kerry A. Ryan (St. Louis), Valuation Lessons From Estate of Adell, 144 Tax Notes 1455 (Sept. 22, 2014):

In Estate of Adell [T.C. Memo. 2014-155], the Tax Court determined that the correct value of a decedent’s interest in a closely held corporation was the figure reported on the original estate tax return. The court rejected alternative values as either using the incorrect valuation method or failing to account for the significant value of a key employee’s personal goodwill. 

October 11, 2014 in Scholarship, Tax, Tax Analysts | Permalink | Comments (0)