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Editor: Paul L. Caron
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Thursday, July 31, 2014

Texas Wesleyan Law Grads File Complaint With ABA, Seek Reissued Texas A&M Diplomas

Texas Lawyer, Texas Wesleyan Law Grads Want Aggie Status, File Complaint With ABA:

Texas A&M Law LogoA dozen graduates of Texas Wesleyan University School of Law, unhappy with how Texas A&M University has treated them since it acquired the law school in 2013, have lodged a complaint with the American Bar Association.

The complaint, sent on July 25 to the ABA, comes two weeks after 500 TWU School of Law alumni submitted a petition to TAMU officials asking the university to "reissue" diplomas under the Texas A&M University School of Law name. The petition was sent to the university president, board of regents and others.

In the complaint to the ABA, the Texas Wesleyan alumni write that they want to be recognized as alumni of Texas A&M University School of Law "with all of the rights and benefits" given to graduates of the law school. ... They allege in the complaint that the TAMU School of Law is out of compliance with standards that require the law school to report accurate and nonmisleading information about the school. The TWU School of Law graduates note in the complaint that TAMU School of Law lists bar passage statistics from 2010, 2011 and 2012, which apply to TWU School of Law, and also publicizes pro bono statistics that include hours done by TWU School of Law alumni.

Continue reading

July 31, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

NY Times: The Lawyer’s Apprentice: How to Learn the Law Without Law School

New York Times, The Lawyer’s Apprentice: How to Learn the Law Without Law School:

LawyerWhen Chris Tittle meets new people and the topic turns to his work, he sometimes fishes in his pockets and produces a business card that reads “Abraham Lincoln.” Below the 16th president’s name in smaller type the card reads, “Just kidding, but I hope to follow in some of his footsteps.”

Mr. Tittle, who sports the kind of full beard more often associated with folk-rock bands than future junior partners, is working toward becoming a lawyer under an obscure California rule that allows people to “read law” much as Lincoln did, studying at the elbow of a seasoned lawyer. “There is very little that would entice me to go $100,000 or more into debt for a credential,” said Mr. Tittle, who is in his first year of a four-year program of practical study.

California is one of a handful of states that allow apprenticeships like Mr. Tittle’s in lieu of a law degree as a prerequisite to taking the bar and practicing as a licensed lawyer. In Virginia, Vermont, Washington and California, aspiring lawyers can study for the bar without ever setting foot into or paying a law school. New York, Maine and Wyoming require a combination of law school and apprenticeship.

The programs remain underpopulated. Of the 83,986 people who took state or multistate bar exams last year, according to the National Conference of Bar Examiners, only 60 were law office readers (so-called for the practice of reading legal texts as preparation). But at a time when many in legal education — including the president, a former law professor — are questioning the value of three years of law study and the staggering debt that saddles many graduates, proponents see apprenticeships as an alternative that makes legal education available and affordable to a more diverse population and could be a boon to underserved communities. ...

Before the prevalence of law schools in the 1870s, apprenticeships were the primary way to become a lawyer. “Stop and think of some of the great lawyers in American history,” said Daniel R. Coquillette, a law professor at Boston College who teaches and writes in the areas of legal history and professional responsibility. “John Adams, Chief Justice Marshall, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson. They didn’t go to law school at all.” ...

[T]here are obstacles. None of the states help prospective law readers locate a supervising lawyer, and finding one willing to take on the responsibility of educating a new lawyer can be difficult. Bar passage rates for law office students are also dismal. Last year only 17 passed — or 28 percent, compared with 73 percent for students who attended schools approved by the American Bar Association.

“The ABA takes the position that the most appropriate process for becoming a lawyer should include obtaining a J.D. degree from a law school approved by the ABA and passing a bar examination,” said Barry A. Currier, managing director of accreditation and legal education for the group.

Continue reading

July 31, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (4)

Forbes: America's Top Colleges (Return on Investment)

Forbes 2Forbes, Ranking America's Top Colleges 2014:

For the seventh year, Forbes has partnered with the Washington, D.C.-based Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP) for America’s Top Colleges. The Forbes list of 650 schools distinguishes itself from competitors by our belief in “output” over “input.” We’re not all that interested in what gets a student into college, like our peers who focus heavily on selectivity metrics such as high school class rank, SAT scores and the like. Our sights are set directly on ROI: What are students getting out of college? ...

Methodology:
Student Satisfaction (25%):  Professor ratings (RateMyProfessor) (10%), actual (12.5%) and predicted (2.5%) freshman-to-sophomore retention rates
Post-Graduate Success (32.5%):  Salary of alumni (Payscale.com) (10%), America’s Leaders List (22.5%)
Student Debt (25%):  Average federal student loan debt load (10%), student loan default rates (12.5%) and predicted vs. actual percent of students taking federal loans (2.5%)
Graduation Rate (7.5%):  Actual graduation rate (5%) and the actual vs. predicted rate (2.5%)
Academic Success (10%):  Students who win prestigious scholarships and fellowships (7.5%) or go on to earn a Ph.D. (2.5%)

Here are the Top 25 colleges, with their corresponding U.S. News & World Report ranking:

  1. Williams (1 Liberal Arts "LA")
  2. Stanford (5 National Universities "NU")
  3. Swarthmore (3 LA)
  4. Princeton (1 NU)
  5. MIT (7 NU)
  6. Yale (3 NU)
  7. Harvard (2 NU)
  8. Pomona (4 LA)
  9. U.S. Military Academy (17 LA)
  10. Amherst (2 LA)
  11. Haverford (9 LA)
  12. Pennsylvania (7 NU)
  13. Brown (14 NU)
  14. Bowdoin (4 LA)
  15. Wesleyan (17 LA)
  16. Carleton (7 LA)
  17. Notre Dame (18 NU)
  18. Dartmouth (10 NU)
  19. Northwestern (12 NU)
  20. Columbia (4 NU)
  21. Cal-Tech (10 NU)
  22. Davidson (9 LA)
  23. Duke (7 NU)
  24. Chicago (5 NU)
  25. Tufts (28 NU)

July 31, 2014 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

Details Emerge in Murder of Dan Markel

Markel[Updated and Corrected]  More details are beginning to emerge in the July 18 murder of Dan Markel, D’Alemberte Professor of Law at Florida State and the founder of PrawfsBlawg, as the result of a shooting in his home:

I have collected links to the many tributes to Dan here.

Dan Markel Memorial Fund To Benefit His Sons, Benjamin Amichai Markel and Lincoln Jonah Markel:

Markel

July 31, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (8)

Death of Dan Markel (1972-2014)

Markel[Updated and Corrected] Dan Markel, D’Alemberte Professor of Law at Florida State and the founder of PrawfsBlawg, was shot in his home in Tallahassee and died on July 19.

July 31, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Who Killed Dan Markel?

Are Academic Law Libraries Doomed?

Law LibraryFollowing up on my previous post, WSJ: Law Libraries Are Doomed: Kenneth J. Hirsh (Cincinnati), Like Mark Twain: The Death of Academic Law Libraries Is an Exaggeration:

At the 2013 CALI Conference on Law School Computing, Professor James Milles, professor and former library director of the SUNY Buffalo Law School, presented his draft paper positing that academic law libraries are doomed [Legal Education in Crisis, and Why Law Libraries are Doomed]. The author presented his contrasting viewpoints in the same session. This paper is based on his presentation and has been updated to account for adoption of the revised law school accreditation standards approved by the ABA Council on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar in 2014. While the author agrees with the underlying observations set out by Professor Milles, he envisions a scenario where law libraries, and more importantly librarians, remain an essential part of law school life.

July 30, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

UCLA Lowell Milken Institute Law Teaching Fellowship

UCLAThe Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy at UCLA School of Law is now accepting applications for the Lowell Milken Institute Law Teaching Fellowship:

This fellowship is a full-time, year-round, one or two academic-year position (approximately July 2015 through June 2016 or June 2017). The position involves law teaching, legal and policy research and writing, preparing to go on the law teaching market, and assisting with organizing projects such as conferences and workshops, and teaching. No degree will be offered as part of the Fellowship program.

July 30, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Bar Exam Technology Disaster: ExamSoft Servers Unable to Handle Crush of Applicants Trying to Upload Their Exams

Inside Higher Ed, Bar Exam Technology Disaster:

Exam SoftNew law graduates in many states experienced a technology snafu at the worst possible time Tuesday night: as they were attempting to upload bar examinations just before deadlines in their states. Many reported spending hours trying and failing to upload their answers. ExamSoft, a company that manages the bar test submission process in many states, acknowledged "slowness or difficulty" being experienced by many test-takers, and said that it was sorry for the difficulties many were having. The company, working with various state bar associations, announced 17 deadline extensions by states, so that people who couldn't submit their exams would not be penalized.

The legal blog Above the Law posted some of the emails and social media messages being posted by angry law graduates. the blog said that the situation "appears to be the biggest bar exam debacle in history."

Many bar exams continue today, so the frustrated test-takers who were up late, some fearing that they may have failed by not submitting their day's results, have another stressful day ahead of them, for many of them without as much sleep as they might have had otherwise.

July 30, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Law Professor Blogs Network Launches International Financial Law Prof Blog

LPBN LogoThe Law Professor Blogs Network is thrilled to announce the launch of International Financial Law Prof Blog, edited by William Byrnes (Thomas Jefferson), Gary Heald (Georgetown) & David Herzig (Valparaiso).

With the support of our sponsor, Wolters Kluwer Law & Business/Aspen Publishers, the Network is seeking to expand in two ways.

First, I am actively recruiting law professors to launch blogs in other areas of the law school curriculum not currently covered by the Network, including Administrative Law, Bankruptcy, Intellectual Property, National Security, Native American Law, Race and the Law, and Trial Advocacy.

Second, I am actively recruiting law professors to affiliate their existing blogs with the Network, like Brian Leiter's Law School Reports, Brian Leiter's Law School Rankings, Mirror of Justice, REFinBlog, The Right Coast, and Sentencing Law and Policy

The Network offers law professors the premier blogging platform and the opportunity to share in growing sponsorship and advertising revenues. For more information about these opportunities, see here.

July 30, 2014 in About This Blog, Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Florida Lawyers' #1 Problem: Too Many Lawyers (and Law Schools)

FloridaABA Journal, The Most Serious Problem Facing Lawyers? Too Many Colleagues, Say About Half of Florida’s Lawyers:

The most serious problem facing the legal profession today is too many lawyers, according to about half the attorneys who responded to a Florida Bar survey last year.

Since 2000, five new law schools have opened in Florida and the number of lawyers in the state has increased from 60,900 to 96,511, the Tampa Bay Times reports. In 1980, the state had only 27,000 lawyers.

Matt Leichter, Florida Legal Sector Peaks Higher, Troughs Lower Than Country’s:

Florida’s legal sector peaked higher and troughed harder than the rest of the southeast and the country.

Real Legal Services (Fla. edition)

Although, the surveyed lawyers have a point: It’s also true, as the article points out, that the number of law schools in Florida needlessly doubled over the last 15 years or so. Unhelpfully, the article publishes law schools’ unemployment rates rather than my preference: percent employed in bar-passage-required jobs, full-time/long-term excluding law-school-funded jobs. Here’re Florida’s law schools’ 2013 results:

  • Florida State – 69.6%
  • University of Florida – 66.4%
  • Stetson – 62.0%
  • University of Miami – 60.7%
  • Nova Southeastern – 60.5%
  • Florida International – 59.6%
  • Thomas – 47.8%
  • Barry – 39.8%
  • Florida A&M – 38.5%
  • Ave Maria – 34.6%
  • Florida Coastal – 30.8%
  • Average Florida Law School – 51.8%
  • Southeast BEA Region Average Law School (Excl. Fla.) – 57.3%
  • Average U.S.A. Law School (Excl. P.R., Fla.) – 56.1%

In general, Florida’s law schools are doing worse than the regional and national averages.

July 29, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

Anderson: The Reading Level of Law Professor Blogs

Robert Anderson (Pepperdine), The Reading Level of Law Professor Blogs:

I recently discovered a feature of Google that allows the user to filter searches by "reading level." ... [D]rawing on the websites listed in Paul Caron's blog traffic rankings on TaxProf Blog, plus a few choices of my own, I produced the following ranking [of 59 blogs and websites]. ...

Rank

Caron Rank

Blog

Basic Level

Advanced Level

Advanced/Basic Difference

1

50

Legal History Blog

2

51

49

2

24

Antitrust & Comp. Policy Blog

1

44

43

3

8

Patently-O

4

32

28

4

18

Harvard Law Corp Gov

1

25

24

5

19

Opinio Juris

1

16

15

6

45

Civil Procedure Prof Blog

0

14

14

7

10

The Incidental Economist

10

23

13

8

31

EvidenceProf Blog

1

12

11

9

30

Legal Whiteboard

0

10

10

10

48

Dorf on Law

1

10

9

11

29

Workplace Prof Blog

2

11

9

12

20

Concurring Opinions

3

12

9

13

6

Leiter Reports: Philosophy

11

20

9

14

NA

Witnesseth

1

9

8

15

47

Legal Ethics Forum

3

10

7

16

22

Constitutional Law Prof

1

7

6

17

11

Lawfare

1

6

5

18

15

Sentencing Law & Policy

1

6

5

19

38

CrimProf Blog

1

6

5

20

28

Balkinization

3

8

5

21

41

Nonprofit Law Prof Blog

0

4

4

22

4

TaxProf Blog

1

5

4

23

2

Volokh Conspiracy

2

6

4

24

49

Adjunct Law Prof Blog

1

4

3

25

13

Leiter's Law School Reports

7

10

3

July 29, 2014 in Blog Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 28, 2014

Ed Kleinbard Named Johnson Professor in Law and Business at USC

USC Press Release:

KleinbardEdward Kleinbard, an internationally recognized tax scholar and author of We Are Better Than This: How Government Should Spend Our Money [(Oxford University Press Oct. 1, 2014)], has been named the Ivadelle and Theodore Johnson Professor in Law and Business at the USC Gould School of Law.

Dean Robert K. Rasmussen called Kleinbard “one of his generation’s leading tax attorneys in the world.  Ed Kleinbard’s career is unparalleled,” Rasmussen said. “The award of the Johnson Professorship signals that Ed is now one of the leading tax scholars in the academy. His work is a unique blend of tax theory with the insights and knowledge gained from years of practice. His book, We Are Better Than This, charts the way forward for us as a nation. All of us at the Gould School of Law are fortunate that he is our colleague and teacher.”

Kleinbard’s scholarship has received praise both inside and outside the legal academy. He has been called “a rock star in the world of tax law” by New York Times Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Gretchen Morgenson and “a superstar tax practitioner, policy adviser and scholar,” by Harvard University President Emeritus Larry Summers, a former secretary of the U.S. Treasury. ...

Kleinbard joined USC Gould in 2009 after serving as the chief of staff of the U.S. Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation, the nonpartisan tax resource to Congress. He previously worked on Wall Street for two decades as a partner in the New York office of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

July 28, 2014 in Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (1)

Overworked and Isolated: Work Pressure Fuels Mental Illness in Academia

The Guardian, Overworked and Isolated: Work Pressure Fuels Mental Illness in Academia:

Academics suffering mental health problems blame their university work directly for their illness, exclusive findings from a Guardian survey reveal.

Heavy workloads, lack of support and isolation are the key factors contributing to mental illness, according to respondents, who range from PhD students to vice-chancellors. The Guardian survey, which specifically targeted academics suffering mental health problems, found that two-thirds of more than 2,500 who responded see their illness as a direct result of their university job. 

Mental Health

The Guardian, We Don't Want Anyone to Know, Say Depressed Academics:

Academics are suffering in silence from mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and eating disorders, exclusive findings from the Guardian's mental health survey of 2,500 academics has shown.

Continue reading

July 28, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

TaxProf Blog Weekend Roundup

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Do You Work Too Much?

New York Times op-ed:  Do You Work Too Much?, by Anna North:

Overworked
The American economy generally operates on the assumption that the more hours you work, the better an employee you are. But increasingly, researchers and workers themselves are saying that working to the point of burnout can be unhealthy, unproductive, and even dangerous — and some are advocating for large-scale solutions that tackle the problem at its source.

At Time, Alexandra Sifferlin looks at burnout among physicians. She writes, “Research shows that up to 40% of U.S. doctors experience emotional, physical, and psychological burnout from their jobs, and the consequences are no different for them than they are for people in other occupations — substance abuse and cutting corners.” And she cites a paper published (appropriately enough) in the new journal Burnout Research, in which the psychology professor Anthony Montgomery delves into some possible causes of doctor burnout — and its dangers. He argues that the medical profession may be exceptionally bad at taking care of its own, which hampers doctors’ ability to care for others. ...

Continue reading

July 27, 2014 in Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, July 26, 2014

The Happiest (Charlottesville) and Unhappiest (Scranton) Places in America

Vox:  The Happiest Places in America, by Danielle Kurtzleben:

If New York is so unhappy, why do so many people keep living there? That's one of the many questions at stake in a new working paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research. [Edward L. Glaeser (Harvard), Joshua D. Gottlieb (British Columbia) & Oren Ziv (Harvard), Unhappy Cities]

Researchers from Harvard and the University of British Columbia used people's self-reported life satisfaction data from the CDC to try to determine a geography of American happiness. What they found is that among the biggest metropolitan areas, the Big Apple is the unhappiest. Scranton, Pennsylvania, takes the honor of the least happy metro area of any size. Meanwhile, Richmond is the happiest large metro area, and Charlottesville, Virginia, is the happiest of any size.

Here's a look at what that geography of happiness looks like, after researchers controlled for demographic characteristics like sex, race, and age. Blue represents the highest happiness measure, and red is the lowest.

Happy

July 26, 2014 in Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (3)

Friday, July 25, 2014

Weekly Legal Education Roundup

Farewell, San Diego!

USD 2After seven wonderful weeks in San Diego, I am back in Malibu. This was my eleventh summer teaching at the University of San Diego School of Law, and I am grateful to Dean Stephen Ferruolo and the kind folks at USD for having me back again. My 65 Tax I students were a joy, as they worked diligently in teams to answer 300 clicker questions over the 21 class sessions. It is a treat to spend seven weeks each year in "America's Finest City" and see our many friends there. It is a time of transition for the USD tax faculty, as Karen Burke, Mark Hoose, and Grayson McCouch have departed and Howard Abrams, Miranda Perry Fleischer, and Vic Fleischer have joined Jordan Barry and Bert Lazerow on the tax faculty.

July 25, 2014 in Legal Education, Miscellaneous, Tax | Permalink | Comments (1)

Schrag: MOOCs: The Final Nail in Legal Education's Coffin?

MOOCPhilip G. Schrag (Georgetown), MOOCs and Legal Education: Valuable Innovation or Looming Disaster?, 59 Vill. L. Rev. 83 (2014):

Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have spread across the landscape of higher education like an invasive plant species. Although few people had heard of MOOCs before 2012, these internet-based courses, taught by university professors, are now routinely offered simultaneously to tens of thousands or in some cases, hundreds of thousands of people. Most MOOCs are still provided free of charge, but the two companies and one non-profit entity that promote MOOCs and provide the software have recently created partnerships with institutions of higher education in order to realize substantial revenues by offering MOOCs for academic credit to tuition-paying students at colleges and universities. Despite resistance from professors at some institutions, MOOCs for credit are proliferating rapidly. This development has great significance for the future of legal education, because most law schools are experiencing an economic crisis and are searching for ways to cut costs and lower tuition so that they can fill their classes and remain viable. Already, some law schools are offering academic credit for distance learning, within limits permitted by the Section of Legal Education of the American Bar Association—limits that may soon be relaxed. Within ten years, MOOCs could replace traditional law school classes altogether, except at a few elite law schools that produce lawyers to serve large corporations and wealthy individuals. However, most law schools might survive by embracing rather than resisting internet-based learning. They could cut costs by reducing faculty and staff positions, using MOOCs for the delivery of most of the legal information that students need, hiring part-time lawyers to help students with exercises to supplement the MOOCs, and concentrating the remaining full-time faculty on first-semester offerings, writing seminars, and clinics. Sadly, the result will be a watered-down form of legal education compared to the three years of interactive experiences that law schools have offered students for the last century. But it may be the only way in which most law schools can survive.

July 25, 2014 in Legal Education, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Enduring Hierarchies in Legal Education

HierarchyOlufunmilayo Arewa (UC-Irvine), Andrew P. Morriss (Dean, Texas A&M) & William D. Henderson (Indiana), Enduring Hierarchies in American Legal Education, 89 Ind. L.J. 941 (2014):

Although much attention has been paid to U.S. News & World Report’s rankings of U.S. law schools, the hierarchy it describes is a long-standing one rather than a recent innovation. In this Article, we show the presence of a consistent hierarchy of U.S. law schools from the 1930s to the present, provide a categorization of law schools for use in research on trends in legal education, and examine the impact of U.S. News’s introduction of a national, ordinal ranking on this established hierarchy. The Article examines the impact of such hierarchies for a range of decision-making in law school contexts, including the role of hierarchies in promotion, tenure, publication, and admissions, for employers in hiring, and for prospective law students in choosing a law school. This Article concludes with suggestions for ways the legal academy can move beyond existing hierarchies and at the same time address issues of pressing concern in the legal education sector. Finally, the Article provides a categorization of law schools across time that can serve as a basis for future empirical work on trends in legal education and scholarship.

July 24, 2014 in Legal Education, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (1)

National Law Journal: Law Profs Remember Dan Markel

MarkelNational Law Journal, Professor Made Reputation Online, and Is Remembered There:

The prevailing wisdom holds that law professors are wise to wait until they earn tenure before they start sharing their opinions in the rough-and-tumble legal blogosphere. Dan Markel wasn't interested in waiting around. He launched his pioneering PrawfsBlawg as soon as he landed an assistant professorship at the Florida State University College of Law in 2005 — even before teaching his first class.

So it seems fitting that the reaction to Markel's July 20 shooting death was immediate, intense and to a large degree expressed online. Scores of law professors have shared their shock and grief on the Internet, and readers rushed to the PrawfsBlawg comments section to offer their thoughts, memories and condolences.

July 24, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

University of California Increases Non-resident Enrollment for Budget Reasons

Los Angeles Times, UC Enrolling More New Students From Other States and Nations:

University of California logoThe number of new UC students from other states and nations will continue to increase this fall, extending a trend that university officials say is financially necessary but critics say is changing the nature of a beloved state institution.

The percentage of all new UC freshman who come from outside California is expected to be 20.2%, up from 18.3% last year and 15.5% the year before, according to preliminary data based on students’ statements that they will enroll.

Among the nine UC undergraduate campuses, the percentages are the highest at UCLA with 30.1%, UC Berkeley with 29.8% and UC San Diego with 28.4%. The lowest shares were at UC Merced with 1.2% and UC Riverside with 6.9%. ...

Administrators say that the nearly $23,000 that nonresidents pay annually on top of the regular $12,192 tuition helps support classes and financial aid for Californians.

Continue reading

July 23, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Law Schools With the Most Applications (Fall 2013)

Law Schools With Most Applications

Rank

School

Applications

Admit

Yield

Median LSAT

Median GPA

US News

1

Georgetown

7257

31%

23%

168

3.74

13

2

Virginia

6048

18%

31%

169

3.87

8

3

G. Washington

6005

42%

18%

165

3.71

20

4

UC-Berkeley

5885

18%

27%

167

3.78

9

5

William & Mary

5849

30%

13%

164

3.73

24

6

Columbia

5797

21%

28%

171

3.70

4

7

NYU

5730

31

24

170

3.72

6

8

UCLA

5562

28%

19%

167

3.79

16

9

Harvard

5485

16%

66%

173

3.88

2

10

Penn

5283

17%

28%

169

3.89

7

Unranked Law Schools With Most Applications

Rank

School

Applications

Admit

Yield

Median LSAT

Median GPA

1

Charlotte

3342

73%

21%

144

2.91

2

Florida Coastal

3085

75%

19%

144

2.97

3

San Francisco

2762

49%

12%

153

3.28

4

John Marshall

2518

71%

23%

149

3.12

5

Suffolk

2367

78%

24%

149

3.27

6

Southwestern

2260

57%

28%

152

3.17

7

Barry

2082

63%

21%

147

2.90

8

Thomas Cooley

2027

79%

36%

145

2.96

9

New England

2013

87%

14%

149

3.04

10

Nova

1645

48%

39%

149

3.07

July 23, 2014 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (4)

Mirror of Justice Joins Law Professor Blogs Network

LPBN LogoI am delighted to announce that Mirror of Justice, a blog dedicated to the development of Catholic legal theory edited by Rick Garnett (Notre Dame) and 19 other prominent law professors of faith, has joined the Law Professor Blogs Network.  

With the support of our sponsor, Wolters Kluwer Law & Business/Aspen Publishers, the Network is seeking to expand in two ways.

First, I am actively recruiting law professors to launch blogs in other areas of the law school curriculum not currently covered by the Network, including Administrative Law, Bankruptcy, Intellectual Property, National Security, Native American Law, Race and the Law, and Trial Advocacy.

Second, I am actively recruiting law professors to affiliate their existing blogs with the Network, like Brian Leiter's Law School Reports, Brian Leiter's Law School Rankings, Mirror of Justice, REFinBlog, The Right Coast, and Sentencing Law and Policy

The Network offers law professors the premier blogging platform and the opportunity to share in growing sponsorship and advertising revenues. For more information about these opportunities, see here.

July 23, 2014 in About This Blog, Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Life's Secret: Love People, Not Pleasure

New York Times op-ed:  Love People, Not Pleasure, by Arthur C. Brooks (President, American Enterprise Institute):

For decades, psychologists have been compiling a vast literature on the relationships between different aspirations and well-being. Whether they examine young adults or people of all ages, the bulk of the studies point toward the same important conclusion: People who rate materialistic goals like wealth as top personal priorities are significantly likelier to be more anxious, more depressed and more frequent drug users, and even to have more physical ailments than those who set their sights on more intrinsic values.

No one sums up the moral snares of materialism more famously than St. Paul in his First Letter to Timothy: “For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.” Or as the Dalai Lama pithily suggests, it is better to want what you have than to have what you want. ...

[W]e are unambiguously driven to accumulate material goods, to seek fame, to look for pleasure. How can it be that these very things can give us unhappiness instead of happiness? There are two explanations, one biological and the other philosophical.

From an evolutionary perspective, it makes sense that we are wired to seek fame, wealth and sexual variety. These things make us more likely to pass on our DNA. Had your cave-man ancestors not acquired some version of these things (a fine reputation for being a great rock sharpener; multiple animal skins), they might not have found enough mating partners to create your lineage.

But here’s where the evolutionary cables have crossed: We assume that things we are attracted to will relieve our suffering and raise our happiness. My brain says, “Get famous.” It also says, “Unhappiness is lousy.” I conflate the two, getting, “Get famous and you’ll be less unhappy.”

But that is Mother Nature’s cruel hoax. She doesn’t really care either way whether you are unhappy — she just wants you to want to pass on your genetic material. If you conflate intergenerational survival with well-being, that’s your problem, not nature’s. And matters are hardly helped by nature’s useful idiots in society, who propagate a popular piece of life-ruining advice: “If it feels good, do it.” Unless you share the same existential goals as protozoa, this is often flat-out wrong.

More philosophically, the problem stems from dissatisfaction — the sense that nothing has full flavor, and we want more. We can’t quite pin down what it is that we seek. Without a great deal of reflection and spiritual hard work, the likely candidates seem to be material things, physical pleasures or favor among friends and strangers.

We look for these things to fill an inner emptiness. They may bring a brief satisfaction, but it never lasts, and it is never enough. And so we crave more. ... This search for fame, the lust for material things and the objectification of others — that is, the cycle of grasping and craving — follows a formula that is elegant, simple and deadly:

Love things, use people.

... It is the worldly snake oil peddled by the culture makers from Hollywood to Madison Avenue. But you know in your heart that it is morally disordered and a likely road to misery. You want to be free of the sticky cravings of unhappiness and find a formula for happiness instead. How? Simply invert the deadly formula and render it virtuous:

Love people, use things.

Easier said than done, I realize. It requires the courage to repudiate pride and the strength to love others — family, friends, colleagues, acquaintances, God and even strangers and enemies. Only deny love to things that actually are objects. The practice that achieves this is charity. Few things are as liberating as giving away to others that which we hold dear.

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July 22, 2014 in Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (4)

The New Republic: Don't Send Your Kid to the Ivy League

The New Republic:  Don't Send Your Kid to the Ivy League: The Nation's Top Colleges Are Turning Our Kids Into Zombies, by William Deresiewicz (author, Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life (2014)):

Ivy League (2014)These enviable youngsters appear to be the winners in the race we have made of childhood. But the reality is very different, as I have witnessed in many of my own students and heard from the hundreds of young people whom I have spoken with on campuses or who have written to me over the last few years. Our system of elite education manufactures young people who are smart and talented and driven, yes, but also anxious, timid, and lost, with little intellectual curiosity and a stunted sense of purpose: trapped in a bubble of privilege, heading meekly in the same direction, great at what they’re doing but with no idea why they’re doing it. ...

I should say that this subject is very personal for me. Like so many kids today, I went off to college like a sleepwalker. You chose the most prestigious place that let you in; up ahead were vaguely understood objectives: status, wealth—“success.” What it meant to actually get an education and why you might want one—all this was off the table. It was only after 24 years in the Ivy League—college and a Ph.D. at Columbia, ten years on the faculty at Yale—that I started to think about what this system does to kids and how they can escape from it, what it does to our society and how we can dismantle it. ...

SheepI taught many wonderful young people during my years in the Ivy League—bright, thoughtful, creative kids whom it was a pleasure to talk with and learn from. But most of them seemed content to color within the lines that their education had marked out for them. Very few were passionate about ideas. Very few saw college as part of a larger project of intellectual discovery and development. Everyone dressed as if they were ready to be interviewed at a moment’s notice.

Look beneath the façade of seamless well-adjustment, and what you often find are toxic levels of fear, anxiety, and depression, of emptiness and aimlessness and isolation. A large-scale survey of college freshmen recently found that self-reports of emotional well-being have fallen to their lowest level in the study’s 25-year history.

So extreme are the admission standards now that kids who manage to get into elite colleges have, by definition, never experienced anything but success. The prospect of not being successful terrifies them, disorients them. The cost of falling short, even temporarily, becomes not merely practical, but existential. The result is a violent aversion to risk. You have no margin for error, so you avoid the possibility that you will ever make an error. Once, a student at Pomona told me that she’d love to have a chance to think about the things she’s studying, only she doesn’t have the time. I asked her if she had ever considered not trying to get an A in every class. She looked at me as if I had made an indecent suggestion.

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July 22, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Monday, July 21, 2014

NLJ: Law School Enrollment Slump Continues

National Law Journal, Enrollment Slump Continues: For Fourth Year, the Number of Law School Applicants Declined in 2014:

The number of applicants to ABA-accredited law schools declined by about 8 percent this year, dashing hopes for a reversal in a four-year downward trend. Applicants have fallen by more than 37 percent since 2010, according to figures from the Law School Admission Council, offering further proof that plenty of would-be lawyers now view a law degree as a risky investment.

"Law school just isn't the path into the middle class that it once was," said Alfred Brophy, a University of North Carolina School of Law professor who has tracked enrollment. "Things have tumbled downhill very rapidly. … Students are disappearing, and it's unclear when they're going to come back." The latest decline in applicants should translate into about 38,000 new law students next fall, Brophy estimates — a nearly 28 percent drop compared to the first-year class of 2010, which had a record 52,488 students.

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July 21, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (5)

Sunday, July 20, 2014

An Epic Weekend

Madison 1I am heading back to San Diego today after one of the great weekends of my life, helping my daughter Jayne get settled in Madison, Wisconsin before she starts her job at Epic Systems, a medical records software company recently profiled in the New York Times and Forbes, on September 2.

Jayne graduated from college last month and is spending the summer with us studying for the MCATs before beginning her job.  She will be joining her brother Reed, who started at Epic last summer following his college graduation.  I helped Jayne open a bank account, join a gym, and move into the apartment she will be sharing with her brother.  We took a break today to attend Epic's annual company picnic ("Epicnic") on its amazing campus (photos herehere, and here).

It was a memorable weekend, filled with warm reminisces about the past and excited speculation about the future.  Shopping with Jayne was a different experience than shopping with Reed last year.  She took the time to outfit her place with exactly the right items, including this spiffy shower curtain:

Madison 2

July 20, 2014 in About This Blog, Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (1)

Saturday, July 19, 2014

University of Wisconsin Diversity Plan Requires 'Proportional Participation' in Grades, Majors

The John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy, Madness in Madison:

WisconsinThe University of Wisconsin's latest diversity plan calls for "equity" in high-demand majors and the distribution of grades

Many American colleges and universities are in the thrall of “diversity,” but none more so than my institution, the University of Wisconsin. This spring, the university adopted a new plan [Framework for Diversity and Inclusive Excellence] that, according to Board of Regents policy, “[p]laces the mission of diversity at the center of institutional life so that it becomes a core organizing principle.” ...

Let us take a closer look at one of these working definitions included, namely “representational equity.” It calls for “proportional participation of historically underrepresented racial-ethnic groups at all levels of an institution, including high status special programs, high-demand majors, and in the distribution of grades.” 

We are not told exactly what adherence to this will entail. It appears to mean that directors of programs and departmental chairs will have to somehow ensure that they have a mix of students with just the right percentages of individuals who embody the various “differences” included in the definition of diversity. I cannot see how that is possible and even if it were, how it improves any student’s education.

Suppose there were a surge of interest in a high demand field such as computer science. Under the “equity” policy, it seems that some of those who want to study this field would be told that they’ll have to choose another major because computer science already has “enough” students from their “difference” group.  

Especially shocking is the language about “equity” in the distribution of grades. Professors, instead of just awarding the grade that each student earns, would apparently have to adjust them so that academically weaker, “historically underrepresented racial/ethnic” students perform at the same level and receive the same grades as academically stronger students.  

At the very least, this means even greater expenditures on special tutoring for weaker targeted minority students. It is also likely to trigger a new outbreak of grade inflation, as professors find out that they can avoid trouble over “inequitable” grade distributions by giving every student a high grade.

Glenn Reynolds (Tennessee), Higher Education Update:  "'Diversity” Plan' Involves Grading By Race And Ethnicity:  "Professors, instead of just awarding the grade that each student earns, would apparently have to adjust them so that academically weaker, ‘underrepresented racial/ethnic’ students perform at the same level and receive the same grades as academically stronger students."

Ann Althouse (Wisconsin), The University of Wisconsin-Madison's "'Diversity' Plan Involves Grading By Race And Ethnicity"... Really?:  "[R]epresentational equity in grading is a goal. Who doesn't share that goal? It's not outrageous unless it's outrageously banal: We want all our students to do well."

Update:

July 19, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (3)

Applying Moneyball to Dating: Finding Undervalued Traits in a Future Spouse

NPR: The Science Of Settling: Calculate Your Mate With Moneyball:

Moneyball Ty[Ty Tashiro's] recent book, The Science of Happily Ever After, explores what "advances in relationship science" can teach us about the partners we choose. Almost 9 in 10 Americans believe they have a soul mate, says Tashiro, but only 3 in 10 find enduring partnerships that do not end in divorce, separation or chronic unhappiness. Clearly something is going wrong — and it starts with our expectations. ...

Our mate preferences have been shaped by natural selection's obsession with physical attractiveness and resources as well as the messages our friends, families and favorite shows transmit about sweethearts and soul mates. And it is at the start of relationships, when we need to make smart, long-term decisions, that we are least likely to do so because we're in the throes of lust, passion and romance. ...

Tashiro advocates a new approach to dating, one that is not so much about lowering standards as giving yourself better ones. Call it "Moneyballing" relationships (Tashiro does); it's all about finding undervalued traits and assets in the dating market. And, just like with baseball, it starts with trying to ignore the superficial indices of value — attractiveness, wealth — in favor of hidden attributes with a stronger correlation to long-term relationship success.

Citing research that finds no reliable link between income level or physical attractiveness and relationship satisfaction, Tashiro steers his readers toward traits such as agreeableness. With married couples, he points out, "liking declines at a rate of 3 percent a year, whereas lust declines at a rate of 8 percent per year," so the smarter, long-term investment is finding someone you genuinely like. Plus, he adds, studies also suggest that agreeable partners are in fact "better in bed" and less likely to cheat over the long haul.

July 19, 2014 in Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, July 18, 2014

Weekly Legal Education Roundup

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Manipulating Citation Rankings

Inside Higher Ed, Manipulating Citation Rankings?:

Highly Cited 2The possession by Saudi Arabia’s King Abdulaziz University of more highly cited researchers than almost any other university in the world raises questions about institutions’ ability to manipulate global rankings.

This is the view of two researchers who last week posted on the arXiv preprint server a paper that ranks universities by the number of highly cited researchers who list them as affiliations. [Which of the World’s Institutions Employ the Most Highly Cited Researchers? An Evaluation of the Data From Highlycited.com] ... They examined the addresses on papers written by the world’s most highly cited researchers between 2002 and 2012, as revealed by Thomson Reuters last month. ...

[T]he University of California system is listed as the primary affiliation of 179 highly cited researchers, followed by Harvard University with 106 and Stanford University with 56. However, some authors also list secondary academic affiliations. When ranked according to how many highly cited researchers list them as either a primary or a secondary affiliation, the University of California remains top, with 198, but King Abdulaziz University leaps from nowhere to second, with 163.

Noting that the Academic Ranking of World Universities, often known as the Shanghai Jiao Tong rankings, takes into account an institution’s proportion of highly cited researchers, the paper says that “the results for King Abdulaziz illustrate that university rankings can be manipulated.” ...

Saudi Arabia is the country with by far the highest proportion (82 percent) of highly cited researchers who list its institutions only as secondary overseas affiliations. The second highest is South Africa, with 45 percent. King Abdulaziz is listed as a secondary affiliation by 122 researchers, compared with 27 for the next most commonly listed institution, Harvard. ...

[S]ome Saudi Arabian universities, including King Abdulaziz, offer highly cited researchers lucrative adjunct professorships, with minimal requirements for them to be physically present, in return for being listed by them as a secondary affiliation. ... King Abdulaziz did not respond to a request for comment.

July 17, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

New England Dean John O'Brien Receives 2014 ABA Kutak Award

O'BrienFollowing up on my previous posts:

ABA, John F. O'Brien is 2014 Kutak Award Recipient:

John F. O’Brien, dean and professor of Law at New England Law| Boston, is the 2014 Robert J. Kutak Award Recipient. The ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar and the Kutak Rock national law firm established the Robert J. Kutak Award in 1984. The award is given annually to an individual who has contributed significantly toward increased cooperation among legal education, the practicing bar, and the judiciary. ...

Above the Law, ABA To Honor Law Dean Who Has Done The Most To Embarrass Legal Education

July 17, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Federalist Society Hosts Teleforum Conference Call Today on Who Judges Who is a Judge?

The Federalist Society hosts a Teleforum Conference Call today at 1:00 p.m. EST on Who Judges Who is a Judge? with Kristin E. Hickman (Minnesota) and Tuan Samahon (Villanova):

FSAt bottom, in Kuretski v. Commissioner  presidential power is at stake. Judges of the U.S. Tax Court (26 USC 7443(f)), were arguably characterized by the U.S. Supreme Court, in Freytag v. Commissioner, as exercising a portion of the judicial power of the United States. Recently, however, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed when it found that the Tax Court exercises only executive power. What are the implications of the D.C. Circuit Court’s opinion on the president’s removal power? Has the D.C. Circuit misread Freytag, or faithfully applied it?

Prior TaxProf Blog op-eds on Kuretski:

July 17, 2014 in Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Largest Employment Gains by Law School

National JuristNational Jurist, Largest Employment Gains by School:

While the nationwide employment rate for recent graduates has been largely flat during the past few years, some schools have bucked the trend and significantly improved their employment rates. Twenty law schools improved their employment rate by 10% or more during the past two years, according to a formula created by The National Jurist to analyze data from the ABA. ... The National Jurist calculates its employment rate using a formula that tracks full-time bar passage required employment at 100%, full-time-JD preferred employment at 70%, and ten other categories at percents from 60% to as low as 10% for non-professional, full-time positions.

Top Schools by Improvement 2011 2013   % Improved
1.  Willamette 57.4% 77.2% 19.7
2.  Illinois 64.5% 81.5% 17.1
3.  Brooklyn 59.0% 76.1% 17.0
4.  Appalachian 44.1% 60.6% 16.5
5.  Toledo 52.3% 68.1% 15.7
6.  Washburn 63.7% 78.5% 14.8
7.  Georgetown 76.0% 90.4% 14.4
8.  William & Mary 73.5% 87.1% 13.6
9.  Boston University 64.2% 77.6% 13.4
10. Case Western 63.8% 76.6% 12.8
11. Pepperdine 56.2% 67.9% 11.8
12. Southern Illinois 71.3% 82.7% 11.4
12. New Hampshire 67.8% 79.1% 11.4
14. University of Washington 70.5% 81.6% 11.1
15. Kansas 68.1% 79.1% 11.0
16. Maine 53.3% 63.8% 10.5
17. UDC 38.9% 49.2% 10.3
18, UCLA 74.7% 84.9% 10.2
19. CUNY 48.3% 58.4% 10.1

July 16, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (6)

CNN: Go to Law School. Rack Up Debt. Make $62,000

CNN Money, Go to Law School. Rack Up Debt. Make $62,000:

CNNLeslie Thompson earns $40,000 a year working two jobs, but her Albuquerque, N.M., house almost went into foreclosure twice this year.

Thompson's trade? She's a lawyer.

Lawyers have been struggling for a while now, but it's gotten even worse: Half of lawyers are now starting at a salary of less than $62,000 a year, according to the National Association for Law Placement.

Not only that, but starting salaries have fallen 13% over the past six years, down from $72,000 in 2008. At the same time, lawyers' student debts are piling up. Thompson is carrying over $150,000 in student loans.

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July 16, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (14)

50 Colleges Charge > $60,000/Year

Business Insider, There Are Now 50 Colleges That Charge More Than $60,000 Per Year:

As the average cost of higher education in America continues to rise, at least 50 American colleges and universities are now charging students more than $60,000 per year. ... Last year, only nine colleges charged more than $60,000.

25 Most

July 16, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (5)

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

8th Circuit Orders New Trial in Unsuccessful Republican Faculty Candidate's Discrimination Suit Against Iowa Law School

Wagner 2Following up on my previous posts (links below) about Teresa Wagner's federal lawsuit claiming she was denied a faculty position because of her conservative views:  the Eighth Circuit today reversed and ordered a new trial.  Wagner v. Jones, No. 13- 1650 (8th Cir. July 15, 2014).

Prior TaxProf Blog coverage:

July 15, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (8)

Moody's: Negative Outlook for Higher Education Continues Even as Green Shoots of Stability Emerge

Moody'sMoody's Investor Services, Negative Outlook for US Higher Education Continues Even as Green Shoots of Stability Emerge:

We maintain a negative outlook for the US Higher Education sector due to limited revenue growth prospects over the next 12 to 18 months, while expense pressures will constrain the ability of many universities to adjust. We expect regional public universities to be most pressured over the next 12 to 18 months while globally prominent private universities with large endowments will perform well, even as they continue to focus on improved financial operations. Despite ongoing strains, emerging trends point to possible stabilization of credit conditions over the next year.

Moody's

July 15, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

IRS Says President's Use of University-Provided House Constitutes Taxable Income

Columbus Dispatch, IRS Sees Ohio University President’s House as Taxable:

AthensWhen Roderick J. McDavis became Ohio University’s president a decade ago, he moved into 29 Park Place, a 7,000-square-foot, 2 1/2-story home at the heart of OU’s campus in Athens.

The rent is free, and McDavis’ contract says he has to live in the house. Plus, it’s convenient for McDavis, administrators, faculty members and students to have him so close to the office.

So should he pay income taxes on the house as a benefit? Many Ohio universities say no. The Internal Revenue Service says yes.

An ongoing IRS audit of OU found that McDavis should pay taxes on his free residency at OU. The university’s board of trustees thought otherwise, voting last month to cover the “unexpected” cost: about $19,000 in federal, state and local taxes for this year. ...

Including his salary, bonuses and other pay, McDavis made nearly $600,000 during the 2013 fiscal year. ...

Meanwhile, several leaders of other Ohio universities with arrangements similar or identical to OU’s are still living tax-free, The Dispatch found. Ohio State University and at least five other universities own their presidents’ residences, and none asks its president to pay rent or taxes.

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July 15, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (14)

Rodriguez: Law Schools and the Lost Generation

Dan Rodriguez (Dean, Northwestern; President, AALS), Law Schools and the Lost Generation:

Elie Mystal has a post today on Above the Law that gets to the heart of a real problem, and one which potentially will only grow in significance and impact. Law grads, as he notes, feel increasingly disaffected from their law schools once they graduate, this disaffection being tied not principally (my characterization, not his) to the quality of the education provided, but to the employment outcomes and correlative debt burden suffered by students out in the marketplace with challenges and stress. In the law schools, we call this group (grads of the last seven years or so) “the lost generation.”

The basic problem which undergirds Elie’s righteous and thoughtful post is that law schools too often regard their unemployed or underemployed graduates, more than, say, a year out, as someone else’s problem. Even those law schools that work hard, and creatively, to increase employment opportunities for their current students and newly-minted graduates lack the clear incentives to continue that assistance — and in a tangible way — over the several beginning years of their graduates’ careers. No wonder why young alums perceive their law school as connecting with them only with their hands out for money. They are more right than wrong.

Let’s keep it real and say, again with credit to Elie’s main message in this post that law schools must be proactive and strategic in providing their graduates with assistance over at least the first few years following graduation.

Elie Mystal (Above the Law), Who Is To Blame For Declining LSAT Applications?:

If you look at the general trend of law school reforms, such as they are, they’re all designed to appeal to the next crop of law students. Law schools are doing nothing to to ameliorate the losses of their former recent students. ...

Law schools think that their recent graduates who got screwed aren’t their problem anymore. In fact, those guys are the biggest problem for law schools. It’s those people, more than anybody else, who are telling their friends and family to “stay away.” It’s those parents who are saying to other parents “my kid went to law school, and look what happened.” Law school deans, economists, and (some members of) the media act like the glut of unemployed and under-employed law graduates no longer affects the market going forward because they’re no longer competing for the choice entry-level jobs. But these people didn’t just die. They’re still out there, still struggling, and still telling their stories to anyone who will listen.

Law schools have created an army of people who tell other people not to go to law school. That is their legacy over the past half decade. Their damage to their own brands is severe.

July 15, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (23)

Monday, July 14, 2014

Fall 2014 Law Review Article Submission Guide

Nancy Levit (UMKC) & Allen Rostron (UMKC) have updated their incredibly useful document, which contains two charts for the Fall 2014 submission season covering 203 law reviews.

The first chart (pp. 1-51) contains information gathered from the journals’ websites on:

  • Methods for submitting an article (such as by e-mail, ExpressO, regular mail, Scholastica, or Twitter)
  • Any special formatting requirements
  • How to request an expedited review
  • How to withdraw an article after it has been accepted for publication elsewhere

The second chart (pp. 52-58) contains the ranking of the law reviews and their schools under six measures:

  • U.S. News: Overall Rank
  • U.S. News: Peer Reputation Rating
  • U.S. News: Judge/Lawyer Reputation Rating
  • Washington & Lee Citation Ranking
  • Washington & Lee Impact Factor
  • Washington & Lee Combined Rating

They also have posted a list of links to the submissions information on each law journal’s website. Nancy notes:

Continue reading

July 14, 2014 in Legal Education, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Germany Loses in Philosophers' World Cup

On the heels of its stirring victory in yesterday's Soccer World Cup, Germany suffered a last-second loss in the Philosophers' World Cup:

July 14, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

San Diego Tax Prof Dinner

Dinner 5

From left: Jordan Barry (San Diego, Francine Lipman (UNLV), Vic, Penelope and Miranda Fleischer (San Diego), Paul Caron (Pepperdine), and Richard Winchester (Thomas Jefferson).  Thanks to Francine for organizing the dinner and for surprising me with a cake celebrating TaxProf Blog's 10 Year Anniversary:

Dinner 2

July 14, 2014 in Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

TaxProf Blog Weekend Roundup

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Number of LSAT Test Takers in June Falls to 14-Year Low

Wall Street Journal, Number of LSAT Test Takers in June Falls to 14-Year Low:

Back in February, a slight dip in LSAT test-takers led Law Blog to wonder if the law-school crisis had turned a corner? The latest LSAT numbers suggest law schools are still digging into a hole.

The number of law school admission tests administered in June was down 9.1% compared to a year earlier, according to figures released by the Law School Admission Council on Thursday.

The 21,802 people who sat for the test last month is the lowest June total in 14 years, suggesting that law schools may still be having difficulty convincing college graduates on the value of a J.D. degree. For schools, it’s a step backward after the glint of hope they got in February when the number of law school admission tests administered inched up 1.1% over the February 2013 total.

LSAC

Matt Leichter, LSAT Tea-Leaf Reading: June 2014 Edition:

Typically, June has the highest proportion of first-time LSATs (~70 percent between 2010 and 2012). This June low bodes ill for the number of applicants next fall. ...

Chart 1

July 12, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (8)

Friday, July 11, 2014

Weekly Legal Education Roundup

How to Get Students to Come to a Make Up Tax Class in the Summer

USD

July 11, 2014 in Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Law Schools Peer Into The Abyss, But The ABA Blocks Serious Change

Forbes:  Law Schools Peer Into The Abyss But The American Bar Association Blocks Serious Change, by George Leef (Director of Research, John W. Pope Center for Higher Education Policy):

GatheringNot so long ago, law school was a growth industry, with new schools being created and enrollments going ever higher. No more. There has been a dramatic turn-around over the last ten years.

Enrollments of first-year students are back where they were 40 years ago. According to the Law School Admissions Council, in 2004, more than 100,000 students applied for law school, but in 2013, just 59,000 did. Some law schools have had to lay off faculty members and administrators. Four independent law schools have recently had their bonds downgraded to “junk” status by Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s, reflecting their questionable finances. ...

Law schools are not free to make many other changes that would do a lot more good, both for law students and for the clients they will eventually serve. That is because the accreditation standards imposed by the ABA require schools to operate in costly and inefficient ways.

Arguably the most vociferous critic of the ABA’s law school mandates is Larry Velvel, dean of the Massachusetts School of Law. In the short but impassioned book he wrote with Kurt Olson, The Gathering Peasants’ Revolt in American Legal Education, he made the case that law schools could train future lawyers at much lower cost if only the ABA would allow that.

Velvel and Olson write that the ABA’s policies are “designed to ensure continued and increasing economic and professional benefits for professors and deans.”

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July 11, 2014 in Book Club, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (7)