TaxProf Blog

Editor: Paul L. Caron
Pepperdine University School of Law

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Law School Rankings By Employment Outcomes:  Florida, Texas

Following up on my previous posts on Law School Rankings By Employment Outcomes:

Derek Muller (Pepperdine) blogs legal employment outcomes among Florida's 11 law schools and Texas's 9 law schools:

Continue reading

April 28, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Monday, April 25, 2016

Law School Rankings:  Graduates Who Made Partner In AmLaw 100 In 2015

Go ToFollowing up on my previous post,   NLJ: Law School Rankings By Graduates In BigLaw Jobs:  National Law Journal, Chart: The Go-To Law Schools' Associates to Partner

The law schools that saw the most alumni promoted to partner in the nation's 100 largest law firms during 2015:

1 (2 in U.S. News) Harvard (34 new partners)
2 (14) Georgetown (32)
3 (8) Michigan (24)
3 (8) Virginia (24)
5 (6) NYU (18)
6 (7) Penn (17)
6 (25) George Washington (17)
8 (12) Northwestern (16)
8 (8) UC-Berkeley (16)
10 (30) Boston College (15)
10 (37) Fordham (15)
12 (4) Columbia (14)
12 (74) Villanova (14)
14 (15) Texas (12)
15 (2) Stanford (11)
15 (17) UCLA (11)
15 (16) Vanderbilt (11)
15 (92) Rutgers (11)
19 (20) Boston University (10)
19 (72) Loyola-Chicago (10)
19 (50) Temple (10)
19 (50) Houston (10)
23 (97) Brooklyn (9)
23 (11) Duke (9)
23 (50) UC-Hastings (9)
23 (4) Chicago (9)
23 (48) Florida (9)
23 (40) Illinois (9)
23 (1) Yale (9)
30 (57) Case (8)
30 (22) Notre Dame (8)

American Lawyer, Law Schools that Feed Big Law Partnerships:

First, what's not a surprise: Harvard, NYU and Georgetown being top generators of partners. This make sense, because they are highly ranked schools with big graduating classes (Harvard had 590 grads, NYU 485 and Georgetown 676). Virtually all the top eight schools for new partners are T-14 schools, with the exception of GW, which ranked 22nd place in last year's U.S. News & World Report. (GW, however, has a big class—461 grads in 2015.)

Continue reading

April 25, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Law School Rankings By Employment Outcomes:  California

Following up on Sunday's post, Law School Rankings By Employment Outcomes: New York And D.C./Maryland/Virginia:  Derek Muller (Pepperdine) blogs legal employment outcomes among California's 21 ABA-accredited law schools.  Stanford (92.3%, 8 law school funded jobs (LSF)), UCLA (91.3%, 34 LSF), and UC-Berkeley (91.0%, 11 LSF) are head and shoulders above the other California law schools in "total placement" (per U.S. News).

April 19, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Monday, April 18, 2016

Princeton Review's Best 173 Law Schools (2016 Edition)

Princeton 2The Princeton Review has published the 2016 edition of The Best 173 Law Schools (press release) (FAQs) (methodology):

The Princeton Review surveyed over 19,700 students attending the 173 law schools.  The 80-question survey asked students to rate their schools on several topics and report on their experiences at them. Some ranking list tallies also factored in school-reported data.

Best Professors:  Based on student answers to survey questions concerning how good their professors are as teachers and how accessible they are outside the classroom.

  1. Duke
  2. Boston University
  3. Virginia
  4. Washington & Lee
  5. Chicago
  6. Pepperdine
  7. St. Thomas (Minnesota)
  8. Stanford
  9. Samford
  10. Charleston

Best Quality of Life:  Based on student answers to survey questions on: whether there is a strong sense of community at the school whether differing opinions are tolerated in the classroom, the location of the school, the quality of social life at the school, the school's research resources (library, computer and database resources).

  1. Virginia
  2. Vanderbilt
  3. St. Thomas (Minnesota)
  4. NYU
  5. Florida State

Best Classroom Experience:  Based on student answers to survey questions concerning their professors' teaching abilities and overall accessibility outside of the classroom, the balance of theory and practical skills in the curricula and the range of courses available, the level of tolerance for differing opinions in class discussion, and their assessments of research resources available.

  1. Stanford
  2. Virginia
  3. Chicago
  4. Northwestern
  5. Duke

Best Career Prospects:  Based on school reported data and student surveys. School data include: the median starting salaries of graduating students, the percent of students employed in a job that requires bar passage (and not employed by the school) and the percent of these students who pass the bar exam the first time they take it. Student answers to survey questions on: how much the law program encourages practical experience; the opportunities for externships, internships and clerkships, and how prepared the students feel they will be to practice the law after graduating.

  1. Pennsylvania
  2. NYU
  3. Chicago
  4. Stanford
  5. Columbia

Continue reading

April 18, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (4)

Sunday, April 17, 2016

Law School Rankings By Employment Outcomes:  New York And D.C./Maryland/Virginia

Derek Muller (Pepperdine) has two great posts on visualizing legal employment outcomes among New York's 15 law schools and D.C/Maryland/Virginia's 16 law schools

In New York, Columbia (98.8%, goosed by 31 law school funded jobs (LSF)), NYU (96.7%, 39 LSF), and Cornell (95.5%, 11 LSF) again are head and shoulders above the other New York law schools in "total placement" (per U.S. News).  Cardozo (76.8%, 1 LSF) and Fordham (76.1%, 0 LSF) surprisingly trail St. John's (81.9%, 0 LSF) and Albany (80.3%, 0 LSF).

Continue reading

April 17, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Sunday, April 10, 2016

2016 Religious Law School Rankings

Firm in the Faith (pre-Law Magazine, Spring 2016):

As gay marriage and other cultural changes sweep the nation, the most devout law schools seek to hold onto their core beliefs.

Religious Law Schools

2014 Religious Law School Rankings:

We compiled a ranking based on the following: percentage and activity of students who belong to the faith; percentage and activity of faculty who belong to the faith; number of religion-focused courses and other ways the school incorporates the faith into the curricula; religion-based journals, centers and clinics; religious services and clergy at the law school; mission of the law school.

Continue reading

April 10, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (3)

Friday, April 8, 2016

The Most Diverse Law Schools

DiverseFollowing up on my previous posts on two new papers by J.T. Manhire (Texas A&M):

Kevin R. Johnson (Dean, UC-Davis), Measuring Law School Excellence: Diversity Among Law Students, 101 Iowa L. Rev. Online 50 (2015):

Professor J.T. Manhire constructively offers measures of a variety of kinds of diversity among law students that might be worthy of U.S. News consideration. He appears to accept as a starting premise the continued use of the “diversity index” that U.S. News publishes as a supplement to the annual rankings of law schools. As Professor Manhire summarizes his position, “[t]he U.S. News index assumes race/ethnicity to be the sole indicator of diversity. This Essay disagrees and proposes an expansion of a law school diversity index by incorporating, at a minimum, indicators organized across three categories that cause cognitive diversity: identity, experience, and training.” He proposes to improve the index by measuring diversity beyond simply the race and ethnicity of the student body. Professor Manhire ultimately hopes to address the question, “[h]ow do law schools know how diverse their student bodies are?”

Continue reading

April 8, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Law School Rankings By Influential Judicial Alumni Measured By H-Index: Michigan Is #1

Ravel, The Law School with the Most Influence Will Surprise You:

Forget Yale and Harvard as the training grounds for future judges. It turns out that Michigan Law has the most concentrated impact on national jurisprudence. Surprised? So were we.

In Ravel’s new power ranking of law schools based on which schools turn out influential judges, Michigan Law tops the list. Instead of looking just at the number of judges a school graduated, we used a new data analysis to rank judges based on both quantity and quality of their work, and then we connected that analysis to where the most influential judges studied.

Judges 2

More About Our Methodology
We based Ravel’s Influence Score on Hirsch’s index. Originally, the h-index was used to compute the impact of researchers in the scientific community, with the goal being to quantify the impact and relevance of an individual’s scientific output. Studies have shown that the h-index is predictive of career trajectory and that it could be applied to compute the impact of research groups. For more on how an h-index score is calculated, check out this explanation.

Continue reading

March 30, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 28, 2016

Map Of The Top 50 Law Schools:  1/3 Are West Of The Mississippi River

U.S. News & World Report, Map: See the Top 50 Law Schools in the U.S.:

The law schools on the map below placed in the top 50 of the 2017 Best Graduate Schools rankings. The map includes data on each school's acceptance rate, tuition costs and more. Due to ties, there are 54 law schools represented on the map.

USN

March 28, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (3)

NYU B-School Did Not Provide GMAT Scores To U.S. News, Falls From #11 To #20 In Rankings

NYUUSNRobert Morse (Director of Data Research, U.S. News & World Report), Why New York University Fell in the Best Business Schools Rankings:

When U.S. News calculates our annual rankings of the Best Graduate Schools, we get all the statistical data we use from the schools themselves. This means U.S. News depends on those schools to provide accurate and complete data in response to our statistical surveys.

When a school does not provide data that are used in the rankings methodologies, that can have a significant effect on its position in the rankings.

During the statistical data collection process for the newly released 2017 edition of Best Business Schools, New York University's Stern School of Business did not submit its data for the number of new entrants to both its full-time and part-time MBA programs who provided GMAT scores. These data were for the fall 2015 entering class. ...

The data are used as part of the calculation to compute a value for a school's average GMAT and GRE scores. This measure is included in the rankings to determine the strength of a school's entering class relative to other full-time and part-time MBA programs. The average GMAT and GRE scores have a weight of 16.25 percent in the full-time MBA rankings and 15 percent in the part-time MBA rankings.

The Stern School of Business' position in both the full-time and part-time MBA rankings for the 2017 edition were negatively affected as a result of the data omission. The school is ranked at No. 20 in the full-time rankings and No. 10 in the part-time rankings. In the 2016 edition of the rankings, the school tied for No. 11 among full-time programs and ranked fourth among part-time programs.

Stern later provided U.S. News with the omitted data points, which are noted on its profile page on usnews.com. These data points are only visible to U.S. News Grad School Compass users, as is the case for all business schools.

U.S. News will not recalculate NYU’s rankings – or any other school’s rankings – because of nonreporting.

NYU Press Release, Why Stern’s Ranking Fell to 20, and Why You Shouldn’t Take it at Face Value:

Continue reading

March 28, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (9)

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

The Best Law Schools For Practical Training

National JuristBest Schools for Practical Training, Nat'l Jurist, p. 22, Spring 2016:

Annually, The National Jurist honors those schools that go above and beyond in preparing law students for the real world in our ranking of Best Law Schools for Practical Training. We look at a number of factors, including which schools have the greatest percentage of students in clinics, externships and simulation courses. We also look at the most robust moot court options.  [Methodology (number of positions filled/number of 2Ls & 3Ls):  Clinics (38%), Externships (24%), Simulations (21%), Additional Offerings (0%), Interschool Competitions (5%).]

Jeffrey Baker witnesses the power of practical training on a daily basis. He's the director of clinical education at Pepperdine University School of Law, which finished 10th on our list, with an A+. "Students are hungry for it," he said.

Top 25

Continue reading

March 23, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (3)

Monday, March 21, 2016

U.S. News Data:  Law School Costs, Starting Salaries For Grads

Texas A&M Law School Shrinks Entering Class By 42% (To 140), Vaults 38 Spots (To 111) In U.S. News Rankings

Texas A&M Law Logo (2016)Texas Lawyer, Which Texas Law School Zoomed Up in Rankings?:

Texas A&M University School of Law in Fort Worth zoomed up in the 2017 Best Law Schools rankings compiled and made public this week by U.S. News & World Report.

Texas A&M ranked 111th on the list this year, up from 149th the previous year.

Andrew Morriss, dean of the Texas A&M law school, wrote in an email that the school's investment in new faculty (12 hired last year) paid off in its reputation scores, used for the magazine's ranking. The dean also credited for the ranking rise the school's decisions to cut class size over two years from 240 to 140, boost scholarships, and slash tuition by more than 15 percent. "That enabled us to be the fifth most selective school in the country," Morriss wrote.

Fort Worth Star Telegram, Our A&M Law School Climbs in Rankings:

Continue reading

March 21, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (5)

After Topping Florida State Law School Again With #48 U.S. News Ranking, University Of Florida's New Dean Sets Sights On #35 Ranking Within 3-5 Years

Florida Logo (GIF)Daily Business Review, Florida Law School Proves to be King of State:

The University of Florida has done it again.

Its law school, one of the oldest and largest in the state, scored highest overall among Florida's law schools on the U.S. News & World Report annual ranking of the nation's law schools.

UF landed in 48th place, two spots ahead of its top rival, Florida State University. This is the second consecutive year UF took the number one spot, stealing it from Florida State two years ago.

UF law dean Laura Ann Rosenbury, who took over this year, was pleased but nowhere near satisfied with the score, which was down one from last year. "I still think we are undervalued as far our overall score, and I'm going to work hard to make sure we move up the national rankings," Rosenbury said, adding she hopes to move to the mid 30s within three to five years. Boosting the school's ranking was one of the goals she listed in her job interview with UF, she said. ...

Continue reading

March 21, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (4)

Friday, March 18, 2016

2017 U.S News Law School Rankings:  Average Student Debt

2017 U.S. News LogoFollowing up on my posts (links below) on the 2017 U.S. News Law School Rankings:  Matt Leichter, Record 16 Law Schools Didn’t Report 2015 Graduate Debt to U.S. News:

[F]or some reason U.S. News didn’t rank law schools by debt, generously offering me an opportunity to do so in its stead. Each year U.S. News lists the amount of debt law schools’ recent graduates took out. Importantly, the figure excludes accrued interest, which can be quite considerable. However, these figures are probably the best estimate of the cost of attendance at a particular law school, presented in a comparable form. The ABA does not publicize graduate debt in the 509 information reports, making U.S. News an unfortunately necessary source.

Here are the 25 law schools with the highest amount of average law school debt (among those students with law school debt).

# SCHOOL 2014 DEBT 2015 DEBT PCT. CHANGE
1. Thomas Jefferson 172,445 172,726 0.2%
2. Columbia 154,076 168,627 9.4%
3. New York University 147,744 166,022 12.4%
4. San Francisco 154,321 162,434 5.3%
5. John Marshall (Chicago) 143,518 162,264 13.1%
6. California Western 151,197 162,260 7.3%
7. New York Law School 166,622 161,910 -2.8%
8. Florida Coastal 162,785 160,942 -1.1%
9. Georgetown 150,529 160,606 6.7%
10. American 159,316 160,274 0.6%
11. Vermont 156,713 156,710 0.0%
12. Miami 143,845 155,796 8.3%
13. Northwestern 163,065 155,796 -4.5%
14. Tulane 140,965 153,606 9.0%
15. Harvard 137,599 149,754 8.8%
16. Pacific, McGeorge 140,517 149,470 6.4%
17. Fordham 140,577 149,058 6.0%
18. Pepperdine 145,525 148,959 2.4%
19. Widener (Commonwealth)   148,496  
20. Whittier 151,602 148,316 -2.2%
21. Loyola (CA) 147,701 148,035 0.2%
22. Virginia 132,182 146,907 11.1%
23. Charleston 147,031 146,230 -0.5%
24. California-Berkeley 143,546 144,981 1.0%
25. Pennsylvania 130,002 144,153 10.9%

Continue reading

March 18, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (9)

Thursday, March 17, 2016

2017 U.S. News Tax Rankings

2017 U.S. News LogoHere are the new 2017 U.S. News Tax Rankings, along with last year's rankings:

2017

Rank

 Tax

Program

2016

Rank

1

NYU

1

2

Georgetown

2

3

Florida

2

4

Northwestern

4

5

Loyola-L.A.

10

6

Virginia

5

7

Harvard

8

8

Boston University

7

9

Columbia

8

9

UCLA.

11

9

Michigan

14

12

Miami

13

12

San Diego

6

12

USC

12

15

Texas

19

16

U. Washington

15

17

Boston College

19

18

Duke

22

18

Pennsylvania

17

20

Indiana

16

20

Yale

24

22

Chicago

19

23

Florida State

n/r

23

Villanova

18

25

Stanford

n/r

The biggest upward moves:

  • +5:  Michigan (#9), Loyola-L.A. (#5)
  • +4   Texas (#15), Duke (#18), Yale (#20)
  • +2:  UCLA (#9), Boston College (#17)
  • Florida State (#23) and Stanford (#25) were unranked last year

The biggest downward moves:

  • -6:  San Diego (#12)
  • -5:  Villanova (#23)
  • -4:  Indiana (#20)
  • -3:  Chicago (#22)
  • Washington University (#22 last year) and Denver (#24 last year) are unranked this year

Here are the rankings of the graduate tax programs, along with last year's rankings.

Continue reading

March 17, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Tax | Permalink | Comments (1)

March Madness Law School Bracket

March MadnessHere is the March Madness Law School Bracket, with outcomes determined by the 2017 U.S. News Law School Rankings (using academic peer reputation as a tiebreaker). The Final Four are Yale (1 in U.S. News), Michigan (8), UC-Berkeley (8), and Virginia (8), with Yale beating Michigan in the championship game.   The closest match ups are:

  • First Round:  Michigan (8) over Notre Dame
  • Second Round:  Yale (1) over Duke (11)
  • Sweet 16:  USC (19) over Indiana (25)
  • Elite 8:  Michigan (8) over USC (19)
  • Final Four:  Michigan (8, 4.4 peer) over Virginia (8, 4.3 peer)
  • Championship:  Yale (1) over Michigan (8) 

Continue reading

March 17, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

2017 U.S. News Peer Reputation Rankings (v. Overall Rankings)

2017 U.S. News LogoContinuing a TaxProf Blog tradition (see links below for 2009-2016), here is the full list of the 196 law schools ranked by academic peer reputation, as well as their overall rank, in the new 2017 U.S. News Law School Rankings (methodology here):

Peer Rank

Peer Score

School

Overall Rank

1

4.8

Yale

1

1

4.8

Harvard

2

1

4.8

Stanford

2

4

4.6

Columbia

4

4

4.6

Chicago

4

6

4.5

NYU

6

6

4.5

UC-Berkeley

8

8

4.4

Penn

7

8

4.4

Michigan

8

10

4.3

Virginia

8

11

4.2

Duke

11

11

4.2

Cornell

13

11

4.2

Northwestern

12

14

4.1

Georgetown

14

15

4.0

Texas

15

16

3.9

UCLA

17

16

3.9

Vanderbilt

16

18

3.6

Emory

22

19

3.5

Washington U.

18

19

3.5

Minnesota

22

21

3.4

USC

19

21

3.4

Boston University

20

21

3.4

Notre Dame

22

21

3.4

Wisconsin

33

21

3.4

North Carolina

38

26

3.3

Iowa

20

26

3.3

Geo. Washington

25

26

3.3

Indiana-Bloom.

25

26

3.3

Ohio State

30

26

3.3

UC-Davis

30

31

3.2

Alabama

28

31

3.2

UC-Irvine

28

31

3.2

Boston College

30

31

3.2

William & Mary

33

31

3.2

Georgia

33

31

3.2

U. Washington

33

37

3.1

Arizona State

25

37

3.1

Fordham

37

37

3.1

Arizona

40

37

3.1

Colorado

40

37

3.1

Illinois

40

37

3.1

Florida

48

37

3.1

UC-Hastings

50

44

3.0

Wake Forest

40

44

3.0

Wash. & Lee

40

44

3.0

Maryland

48

44

3.0

Tulane

50

48

2.9

Florida State

50

49

2.8

BYU

38

49

2.8

Utah

45

51

2.7

George Mason

45

51

2.7

Miami

60

51

2.7

Connecticut

65

51

2.7

Kansas

65

51

2.7

Tennessee

65

51

2.7

Denver

72

51

2.7

Cardozo

74

51

2.7

American

78

51

2.7

Oregon

78

60

2.6

SMU

45

60

2.6

Temple

50

60

2.6

Houston

50

60

2.6

Case Western

57

60

2.6

Georgia State

57

60

2.6

Kentucky

60

60

2.6

Loyola-L.A.

65

60

2.6

Pepperdine

65

60

2.6

Missouri

65

60

2.6

San Diego

74

60

2.6

Pittsburgh

78

71

2.5

Nebraska

57

71

2.5

Loyola-Chicago

72

71

2.5

Chicago-Kent

86

71

2.5

Hawaii

92

75

2.4

Baylor

55

75

2.4

Richmond

55

75

2.4

Cincinnati

60

75

2.4

Oklahoma

60

75

2.4

UNLV

78

75

2.4

Northeastern

82

75

2.4

Lewis & Clark

92

75

2.4

Rutgers

92

75

2.4

South Carolina

92

75

2.4

Brooklyn

97

75

2.4

Indiana-Indy

100

75

2.4

Santa Clara

129

87

2.3

New Mexico

60

87

2.3

Seton Hall

65

87

2.3

Villanova

74

87

2.3

St. Louis

82

87

2.3

Syracuse

86

87

2.3

Arkansas-Fay.

86

87

2.3

Michigan State

100

87

2.3

Howard

106

87

2.3

Seattle

111

87

2.3

Marquette

123

97

2.2

LSU

82

97

2.2

Louisville

92

97

2.2

West Virginia

97

97

2.2

SUNY-Buffalo

100

97

2.2

Mississippi

106

97

2.2

DePaul

111

97

2.2

Hofstra

111

97

2.2

Maine

111

97

2.2

UMKC

123

97

2.2

Arkansas-LR

136

107

2.1

St. John's

74

107

2.1

Penn State-Dick.

86

107

2.1

Penn State-Univ.

86

107

2.1

Catholic

103

107

2.1

Stetson

103

107

2.1

Texas A&M

111

107

2.1

Idaho

111

107

2.1

Wyoming

123

107

2.1

CUNY

131

107

2.1

Vermont

132

117

2.0

Tulsa

86

117

2.0

Wayne State

97

117

2.0

Drexel

111

117

2.0

Baltimore

111

117

2.0

Mercer

123

117

2.0

Montana

123

117

2.0

Gonzaga

132

117

2.0

Willamette

132

117

2.0

Loyola-NO

140

117

2.0

San Francisco

Tier 2

127

1.9

New Hampshire

82

127

1.9

Creighton

106

127

1.9

Washburn

106

127

1.9

Drake

111

127

1.9

New York Law S.

111

127

1.9

St. Thomas (MN)

111

127

1.9

Texas Tech

123

127

1.9

Albany

129

127

1.9

Quinnipiac

132

127

1.9

Pace

136

127

1.9

North Dakota

144

127

1.9

Memphis

Tier 2

139

1.8

Cleveland State

106

139

1.8

Duquesne

111

139

1.8

Chapman

136

139

1.8

Akron

136

139

1.8

South Dakota

143

139

1.8

McGeorge

144

139

1.8

Toledo

144

139

1.8

Southwestern

Tier 2

139

1.8

Suffolk

Tier 2

148

1.7

William Mitchell

140

148

1.7

John Marshall (IL)

Tier 2

148

1.7

Samford

Tier 2

148

1.7

S. Illinois

Tier 2

148

1.7

Dayton

Tier 2

148

1.7

Valparaiso

Tier 2

148

1.7

Widener (DE)

Tier 2

155

1.6

Florida Int'l

103

155

1.6

Hamline

140

155

1.6

N. Illinois

144

155

1.6

Oklahoma City

144

155

1.6

Elon

Tier 2

155

1.6

Golden Gate

Tier 2

155

1.6

Mississippi C.

Tier 2

155

1.6

N. Kentucky

Tier 2

155

1.6

Nova

Tier 2

155

1.6

Roger Williams

Tier 2

155

1.6

S. Texas

Tier 2

155

1.6

St. Mary's

Tier 2

155

1.6

Widener (PA)

Tier 2

168

1.5

Campbell

144

168

1.5

Cal-Western

Tier 2

168

1.5

Capital

Tier 2

168

1.5

NC Central

Tier 2

168

1.5

Ohio Northern

Tier 2

168

1.5

Touro

Tier 2

168

1.5

Detroit Mercy

Tier 2

175

1.4

John Marshall (GA)

Tier 2

175

1.4

Florida A&M

Tier 2

175

1.4

New England

Tier 2

175

1.4

Southern

Tier 2

175

1.4

Texas Southern

Tier 2

175

1.4

Dist. of Columbia

Tier 2

175

1.4

W. New England

Tier 2

182

1.3

Faulkner

Tier 2

182

1.3

Regent

Tier 2

182

1.3

St. Thomas (FL)

Tier 2

182

1.3

Whittier

Tier 2

186

1.2

Appalachian

Tier 2

186

1.2

Ariz. Summit

Tier 2

186

1.2

Charleston

Tier 2

186

1.2

Liberty

Tier 2

186

1.2

Thomas Jefferson

Tier 2

191

1.1

Ave Maria

Tier 2

191

1.1

Barry

Tier 2

191

1.1

Charlotte

Tier 2

191

1.1

Florida Coastal

Tier 2

191

1.1

W. Mich. Cooley

Tier 2

191

1.1

Western State

Tier 2

Press Release, Kaplan Test Prep Survey: Pre-Law Students Put Heavy Emphasis on U.S. News & World Report’s Rankings, but Most Law School Admissions Officers Want Them Gone:

According to a Kaplan survey of over 1,000 pre-law students, 73% say U.S. News & World Report’s law school rankings will be an important factor in their decision of where to apply and enroll.* But most law school admissions officers think rankings should play a less important role. A separate Kaplan survey of 120 law schools across the United States shows that only 40% think U.S. News & World Report’s rankings should be an important factor in future applicants’ decision making processes.** In fact, over half (52%) of admissions officers agree with the statement, “I think it would be in everyone's interests - prospective students, current students, alumni and school administrators - if there were no rankings lists at all.” In contrast, only 31% of pre-law students share the view that the rankings should be done away with.

Prior years' rankings:

Continue reading

March 16, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, March 10, 2016

2017 U.S. News Law School Rankings Leak: The Top 50 100

2017 U.S. NewsAlthough the new 2017 law school rankings will be released online on Wednesday, March 16, the Top 50 has been leaked online

The biggest winners are Houston (+9), Indiana (+9), UC-Hastings (+9), Wake Forest (+7), Boston University (+6), Boston College (+4), Ohio State (+4), Michigan (+3), Arizona (+2), Iowa (+2), Temple (+2), UC-Irvine (+2), Washington & Lee (+2)

The biggest losers are Alabama (-6), University of Washington (-5), BYU (-4), North Carolina (-4), William & Mary (-4), Duke (-3), Emory (-3), Fordham (-3), George Mason (-3), George Washington (-3), Utah (-3), Georgia (-2), Minnesota (-2), Wisconsin (-2)

Update: The Top 100 is now available here and here.

March 10, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (15)

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

NLJ:  Law School Rankings By Graduates In BigLaw Jobs

NLJ 2National Law Journal, The 2016 Go-To Law Schools:

New associate hiring held steady in 2015 after three years of growth, with the country’s largest 100 law firms bringing on 3,412 new law school graduates. Among the 50 law schools most popular with those employers, 23 percent of last year’s graduates landed associate jobs—the same percentage as the previous year.

We’ve ranked the top 50 law schools by percentage of 2015 juris doctors who took associate jobs at the largest 100 firms. The selection of those 100 law firms was based on lawyer count—as identified on the NLJ 350, The National Law Journal’s annual survey of the nation’s largest law firms. We also examined tuition at the schools that produced the most Big Law associates, and we ranked the schools with the most alumni promoted to partner in 2015.

The Top 50 Go-To Law Schools:  These schools sent the highest percentage of new graduates to the largest 100 law firms:

Continue reading

March 8, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Monday, February 29, 2016

2017 U.S. News Law School Rankings

2017 U.S. NewsRobert Morse (Director of Data Research, U.S. News & World Report) announced today that the new 2017 law school rankings will be released online on Wednesday, March 16 and in hard copy on Tuesday, April 5.  Here is my coverage of the current 2016 law school rankings:

February 29, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Is Wake Forest Law School's Offer To Pay Students To Take The GRE A U.S. News Rankings Ploy?

Wake Forest Law School (2016)Above the Law, This Law School Will Pay You To Take The GRE To Save Its U.S. News Rank From The Dreaded LSAT:

Law schools have been trying to do away with using the LSAT as an admissions requirement for quite some time. The ABA first took up the idea of axing the LSAT in 2011, and then in 2014, instituted a new rule that would allow some law schools (i.e., law schools connected to a university or college with an undergraduate program) to fill up to 10 percent of their entering classes with students who hadn’t taken the LSAT. Several law schools, including SUNY Buffalo, Drake, the University of Iowa, the University of Hawaii, and St. John’s University quickly rushed to begin enrolling students without LSAT scores. Just one year later, the ABA voted to repeal its LSAT exemption rule, effective with the incoming class of fall 2017.

Now that evidence of the great law school brain drain is on display for all the world to see, with LSAT profiles of matriculants dipping lower and lower every year, law school administrators are trying even harder to find a way to weasel out of having to admit students who have taken the LSAT (unless, of course, their LSAT scores are amazing; those students are allowed to continue taking the LSAT, if only because those high scores will help the law school’s U.S. News ranking instead of hurting it).

What are law schools trying to do now to keep the LSAT far, far away from their U.S. news ranking? At Wake Forest University School of Law ... has teamed up with Educational Testing Service (ETS) and two other law schools to see if the GRE would work as an alternative to the LSAT for law school admissions, and the school needs assistance from both current students and recent graduates for some experimentation. ...

How desperate is Wake Forest to get rid of the LSAT? Wake Forest is so desperate that it’s willing to pay people to take a standardized test with a math component. Yikes.

Continue reading

January 30, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (4)

Monday, January 25, 2016

SoCal Law Students Invited To ABA Tax Section Careers In Tax Law Dinner On Jan. 28

ABAThe ABA Tax Section invites all Southern California area law students to attend a Careers in Tax Law Dinner this Thursday, Jan. 28, at the J.W. Marriott L.A. Live at 7:00 p.m.:

The ABA Section of Taxation cordially invites you to the Careers in Tax Law Dinner at the 2016 Midyear Meeting. A dynamic panel of tax practitioners will speak about the nature of their jobs, what they do, and how students might best prepare for and pursue careers in this field. Dinner will be provided.

Continue reading

January 25, 2016 in ABA Tax Section, Law School Rankings, Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Ayres Data On 1L Enrollment Changes, 2011 To 2014

Following up on yesterday's post, Ayres: The U.S. News Rankings Keep Dozens Of Weak Law Schools Afloat, Preventing A 'Culling Of Legal Education's Herd':  Ian has asked me to post this spreadsheet with the underlying data.  Here is a chart of the law schools (ranked and unranked) with the largest percentage contraction in their first-year class from 2011 to 2014:

Ayres

January 19, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Monday, January 18, 2016

Ayres:  The U.S. News Rankings Keep Dozens Of Weak Law Schools Afloat, Preventing A 'Culling Of Legal Education's Herd'

2016 U.S. News RankingsIan Ayres (Yale), Lower-Ranked Law Schools Should Be Thanking U.S. News:

Law professors love to hate on the U.S. News law school rankings. Lower-ranked schools in particular find it very difficult competing for an important segment of applicants who are intent on simply going to the highest ranked school possible.

But these rankings may have been responsible for keeping dozens of lower and unranked law schools in business. ...

The top 50 schools with the highest U.S. News rankings saw their enrollments drop by about 8%. Why wouldn’t highly ranked schools be willing to reduce their admission standards to keep their classes filled?

One important reason is the fear of falling in future U.S. News rankings. A school that dramatically reduced its admission standards would fall in the rankings and have a harder time recruiting applicants in future years (and might have poor bar results which would lead to a further fall in the rankings). ... [A]ny school dropping credentials in order to boost class size would have to worry that its peers would instead invest (by running a deficit) in maintaining students’ entering credentials – and as a result would shoot by them in the U.S. News rankings. ...

If the top 150 ranked schools had maintained their 2011 enrollment class size there would have likely been 5828 fewer students for the 53 unranked law schools to admit. This would have forced the unranked schools as a group to shrink their first year classes by 57.4%. The unranked schools had already seen their first-year enrollment drop by 29.5% (4255) so the loss of 5828 more students would have counterfactually meant a total contraction of 70%. ...

Continue reading

January 18, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (4)

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Henderson, McEntee & Shepard Propose Changes To U.S. News Law School Rankings Methodology

2016 U.S. News RankingsKyle McEntee (Law School Transparency), How To Fix The U.S. News Law School Rankings:

Perhaps the most troubling aspect of the U.S. News rankings methodology is the expenditures per student component, which actually includes two related metrics. The first, worth 9.75% of total rank, is the amount spent on faculty, staff, and services divided by total JD students. The second, worth 1.5% of total rank, adds the amount spent on financial aid to the equation. If you burn money (literally), you improve your standing on the rankings as long as there’s an educational purpose. ...

Last year, I wrote a memo to Morse and his team, co-signed by Chief Justice Randall Shepard (former CJ of the Indiana Supreme Court) and professor Bill Henderson, asking U.S. News to adopt one of two alternatives to the expenditures per student metric.

We also asked that the new metric replace two other metrics: student-to-faculty ratio and library resources. The library resources component does not relate to a 21st century legal education. Additionally, the ABA Section of Legal Education determined that the student-faculty ratio is an outdated proxy for quality and no longer uses it in assessing accreditation.

In sum, the proposed metric would replace 15% of total rank. Importantly, it aligns rankings incentives with the goal of providing an accessible, affordable legal education. Here are the two proposals:

Continue reading

January 14, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (7)

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Here’s What Happened When A Law School Dean Challenged A U.S. News Ranker

2016 U.S. News RankingsBlake Edwards (Bloomberg BNA), Here’s What Happened When a Law School Dean Challenged a U.S. News Ranker:

On Saturday, at the American Association of Law Schools’ annual meeting in New York, the AALS’s Section for the Law School Dean hosted a panel on law school rankings. There were at least a couple hundred people in attendance. Many in the room, including the moderators, directed their frustration at Robert Morse, Chief Data Strategist for U.S. News.

When the meeting was opened up for questions, Nebraska Law School Dean Susan Poser stepped up to the microphone. “I don’t know anything about schools except the one I went to and the one I’m at now,” Poser said. “How do you justify asking us to rank the prestige of other schools, and how do you justify giving this component such a large weight?”

When Posner finished her question, the crowd broke into eager applause. Morse smiled and waited patiently before defending the rankings.

Continue reading

January 12, 2016 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (7)

Monday, December 21, 2015

July 2015 California Bar Exam Results

California State BarThe July 2015 California bar passage rates by school are out. Here are the results for first time test takers for the 21 California ABA-approved law schools, along with each school's U.S. News ranking (California and overall):

Bar Pass

Rank (Rate)

 

School

US News Rank

CA (Overall)

1 (88.8%)

Stanford

1 (2)

2 (86.7%)

USC

4 (20)

3 (85.4%)

UCLA

3 (16)

4 (84.8%)

UC-Berkeley

2 (8)

5 (79.8%)

UC-Irvine

5 (30)

6 (76.5%)

Loyola-L.A.

10 (75)

7 (74.3%)

UC-Davis

6 (31)

8 (72.0%)

San Diego

9 (71)

9 (71.2%)

Chapman

12 (127)

10 (69.9%)

McGeorge

Tier 2

11 (69.3%)

Santa Clara

11 (94)

12 (68.7%)

Pepperdine

7 (52)

68.2%

Statewide Ave. (CA ABA-Approved)

13 (67.5%)

UC-Hastings

8 (59)

14 (59.9%)

Cal-Western

Tier 2

15 (55.6%)

Western State

Tier 2

16 (53.3%)

La Verne

n/r

17 (50.6%)

Southwestern

Tier 2

18 (47.7%)

T. Jefferson

Tier 2

19 (47.4%)

San Francisco

Tier 2

20 (39.3%)

Golden Gate

Tier 2

21 (37.7%)

Whittier

Tier 2

One of the California-accredited law school (Lincoln Law School of Sacramento) had a higher pass rate (44.3% (23/52)) than two of the ABA-accredited law schools (Golden Gate (39.3%) and Whittier (37.7%)).

Here are the out-of-state schools with the highest and lowest pass rates:

Continue reading

December 21, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (3)

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Manhire:  Beyond The U.S. News Index — A Better Measure Of Law School Diversity

2016 U.S. News RankingsJ. T. Manhire (Texas A & M), Beyond the U.S. News Index: A Better Measure of Law School Diversity, 101 Iowa L. Rev. Online 1 (2015):

The U.S. News & World Report publishes a diversity index along with its annual ranking of U.S. law schools. Race and ethnicity are the only factors the magazine uses to measure law school diversity. But is this a meaningful measure of student difference? Are race and ethnicity all that count or are there other differences that contribute to a richer educational experience for students and better outcomes for law schools? In a 2011 Iowa Law Review article, Kevin Johnson argues that law school diversity is not limited to only race and ethnicity. He further argues that law school diversity, defined broadly, is critical to the success of legal education; both for the students and the institutions that serve them.

Continue reading

December 9, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (2)

Monday, December 7, 2015

College And University President Salaries, 2013

Chronicle of Higher Education, Executive Compensation at Private and Public Colleges:

The Chronicle's executive-compensation package has been updated with information on private-college presidents for the 2013 calendar year.

The update provides data on 558 chief executives at 497 private nonprofit colleges in the United States. The median salary for leaders in office for the full year was $436,429. Thirty-two of the presidents earned more than $1 million.

The most recent data on public-college presidents, also from 2013, include information on 238 chief executives at 220 public universities and systems in the United States. The median salary for those in office for the full year was $428,250. Two of the presidents earned more than $1 million.

Here are the Top 15 private college presidents by total 2013 compensation:

Top 8
Top 15

Here are the Top 15 public college presidents by total 2013 compensation:

Continue reading

December 7, 2015 in Law School Rankings | Permalink | Comments (7)

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Law School Rankings By 'Super Lawyer' Alumni

National JuristWhich Schools Produce the Most 'Super Lawyers'?, Nat'l Jurist, Fall 2015, p. 6:

Looking for a super law school? Well, some schools produce grads who turn out to be "Super Lawyers" in higher numbers than other.

Each year, Law & Politics' Super Lawyers magazine selects a pool of outstanding lawyers — no more than 5 percent from each state  — through a patented, multi-phase process that involves peer nominations and independent research in 12 categories, such as honors and awards received and community service undertaken. They're called "Super Lawyers."

The National Jurist took this analysis a step further to see which law schools produced the most Clark Kents of the legal world.

We compared the number of Super Lawyers per school with an estimate for the number of alumni per school to determine the percentage of alumni who are SUper Lawyers. We also included the number of "Rising Stars" in our calculations — attorneys who are younger than 40 or have been in practice for less than 10 years.

It should come as no surprise that some institutions, such as Yale Law School, Harvard Law School and University of Virginia School of Law, top the list. There's not much Kryptonite in those places.

However, our list of the 2015 Super Lawyer schools shows a slew of underdogs that have earned a place at the top, including the No. 1 school — Baylor University School of Law.

Dean Brad Toben said his school prides itself on producing "Baylor Lawyers." It turns out that a good many happen to be super as well. ... The Princeton Review has called Baylor Law School "the Marine Corps of law school" for its focus on discipline and workload demands."

Other schools that place better in their Super Lawyer rankings than in their U.S. News & World Report rankings, including University of Florida Levin College of Law, which placed fourth; Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law, with placed 10th; and Boston College Law School, which placed 12th.

Continue reading

December 3, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (5)

Law School Rankings by BigLaw Partners

Edward Adams (Minnesota) & Samuel Engel (J.D. 2016, Minnesota), Does Law School Still Make Economic Sense?: An Empirical Analysis of “Big” Law Firm Partnership Prospects and the Relationship to Law School Attended, 63 Buff. L. Rev. 609 (2015):

This study is the first to comprehensively examine the relationship between law school attended and achieving partnership in the 100 largest American law firms. Seeking to address issues related to a previous study by Ted Seto [Where do Partners Come From, 62 J. Legal Educ. 242 (2012)], the extensive empirical analysis included in this paper is a critical and seminal addition to the increasingly visible debate regarding the value of a legal education, law school rankings, and the factors that should be considered by potential law students when choosing a law school to attend. ...

Table 1 ranks the top 100 law schools, according to an index score based on the number of partners from each school and their weighted class size as further described below.  The table also includes an indicator that states the difference between this ranking and the United States News and World Report ranking.  Although the celebrated T-14 nearly stayed intact, significant differences are seen immediately outside that range.  The index score is included to demonstrate the actual magnitude between different rankings, and the last four columns provide supplementary information helpful in properly analyzing the index score. ...

Continue reading

December 3, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, November 20, 2015

Law School Rankings By New BigLaw Partners

Following up on my previous posts on law school rankings by the number of BigLaw Partners by Ted Seto (Loyola-L.A.), Rob Anderson (Pepperdine), and Edward Adams (Minnesota) (NY Times coverage):  Bloomberg BNA, The Law Schools New Big Law Partners Attended:

How much weight does a prestigious law degree hold when it comes to climbing the ranks at a large law firm? ...

Over the past several months, a number of law firms have announced new classes of partners for the upcoming year, and we thought it would be a fruitful exercise to take a look at who these lawyers are and where they come from. ... Big Law Business reviewed the legal education of 299 lawyers who were elected partners at AmLaw 100 and 200 firms, effective between Oct. 1 and Jan. 2016.

Here are the Top 31 law schools:

1.     Harvard:  21 new partners
2.     NYU:  15
3.     Michigan:  10
4.     Georgetown, Northwestern:  9
6.     Virginia:  8
7.     Chicago, Columbia, UC-Berkeley:  7
10.   Boston College:  6
11.   Boston University, Fordham, George Washington, Illinois, UCLA, Vanderbilt:  5
17.   American, Brooklyn, Cardozo, Case Western, Penn, Stanford, St. Louis, Texas, USC, Yale:  4
27.   Chicago-Kent, Georgia, Notre Dame, San Diego, Tennessee:  3

Continue reading

November 20, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, November 16, 2015

Creighton Joins Rankings Hall Of Shame; Graduation Rate Was 43%, Not 91%

CreightonU.S. News & World Report, Update to Creighton University's 2015 Best Online Programs Ranking:

Creighton University recently advised U.S. News that it misreported data that were used in the 2015 Best Online Programs rankings. The misreported data resulted in the school's numerical rank being higher than it otherwise might have been in the 2015 Best Online Graduate Business Programs rankings, which exclude MBA programs.

Because of the discrepancy in Creighton University's ranking, U.S. News has moved the school to the "Unranked" category in the 2015 Best Online Graduate Business Programs rankings on usnews.com. Schools in the Unranked category do not receive numerical rankings from U.S. News. ...

Creighton University advised U.S. News that it submitted an incorrect three-year graduation rate for its 2010-2011 entering class. The school told U.S. News that its correct three-year graduation rate for that class was 43 percent; it originally reported the incorrect rate of 91 percent. This is a 48 percentage-point difference.

Continue reading

November 16, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, November 13, 2015

U.S. News To Law School Rankings Voters: Oops

2016 U.S. News RankingsI previously blogged how U.S. News & World Report sent defective ballots to voters in the law school specialty rankings (Clinical, Environmental Law, Health Law, Intellectual Property, International Law, Legal Writing, Tax, and Trial Advocacy) by instructing them to "[i]dentify up to fifteen (15) schools that have the highest-quality alternative dispute resolution courses or programs."  As I predicted, U.S. News has sent a new letter to voters, apologizing for the snafu and enclosing new, corrected ballots:

Continue reading

November 13, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

2016 U.S. News Global Universities Rankings

USN 2U.S. News & World Report, Best Global Universities Rankings:

These [750] institutions from the U.S. and nearly 60 other countries have been ranked based on 12 indicators that measure their academic research performance and their global and regional reputations.  Here are the Top 25:

1.   Harvard (100.0)
2.   MIT (94.3)
3.   UC-Berkeley (92.2)
4.   Stanford (89.0)
5.   Oxford (86.7)
6.   Cambridge (86.2)
7.   Cal-Tech (85.1)
8.   UCLA (84.5)
9.   Columbia (83.3)
10. Chicago (82.9)

Continue reading

November 4, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, October 30, 2015

The Economist College Rankings: Alumni Earnings Above Expectations

American universities claim to hate the simplistic, reductive college rankings published by magazines like US News, which wield ever-growing influence over where students attend. Many have even called for an information boycott against the authors of such ratings. Among the well-founded criticisms of these popular league tables is that they do not measure how much universities help their students, but rather what type of students choose to attend each college. A well-known economics paper by Stacy Dale and Alan Krueger found that people who attended elite colleges do not make more money than do workers who were accepted to the same institutions but chose less selective ones instead—suggesting that Harvard graduates tend to be rich because they were already intelligent and hard-working before they entered college, not because of the education or opportunities the university provided.

On September 12th America’s Department of Education unveiled a “college scorecard” website containing a cornucopia of data about universities. The government generated the numbers by matching individuals’ student-loan applications to their subsequent tax returns, making it possible to compare pupils’ qualifications and demographic characteristics when they entered college with their salaries ten years later. That information offers the potential to disentangle student merit from university contributions, and thus to determine which colleges deliver the greatest return and why.

Continue reading

October 30, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (8)

College Of Charleston Business School Joins Rankings Hall Of Shame; Average GMAT Score Was 539, Not 591

CharlestonBob Morse (U.S. News & World Report), Update to College of Charleston's 2016 Best Business Schools Ranking:

The College of Charleston recently advised U.S. News that it misreported data that were used in the 2016 Best Graduate Schools rankings. 

The misreported data resulted in the school's numerical rank, which U.S. News had calculated but had not published, being higher than it otherwise might have been in the 2016 Best Business Schools rankings. ...

Continue reading

October 30, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Villanova Law School Is Still Paying A Steep U.S. News Rankings Price For Cooking Its Admissions Books

Villanova Logo (2015)Philadelphia Inquirer, Villanova Law School Paying a Price Despite Doing Right:

Honesty is the best policy, goes the childhood refrain.

But it can come with a price. Just ask Villanova University School of Law, which is finding that the truth still hurts years after it acknowledged a handful of administrators secretly manipulated admissions data of incoming first-year students.

Before disclosure in early 2011 of the admissions fraud, which was perpetrated to boost the school's ranking in the U.S. News & World Report annual survey, Villanova was comfortably positioned among the nation's top 100 law schools. ...

Villanova is still within the top 100, but its U.S. News ranking has plummeted 20 places since the disclosure to No. 87 in the newly released 2016 ranking. And it has had to spend lavishly to stay in the ratings game since it became known that the law school supplied falsified GPA and LSAT scores to both U.S. News and the American Bar Association for an unknown number of years before 2010.

Continue reading

October 15, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (4)

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

The Best U.S. News Voter Swag: Texas A&M

As we approach mid-October, U.S. News ballots soon will be sent to deans, associate deans of academic affairs, faculty appointments committee chairs, and the most recently tenured faculty members at the nation's law schools.  My friend and recently tenured colleague Babette Boliek reports that law porn has been replaced with law swag:  her favorite (thus far):

Texas A&M

October 7, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (14)

Harrison: Law School Rankings And The Law Professor 'Recognition Race'

Jeffrey L. Harrison (Florida), Message or Messenger: The Rise of Professor Porn and the Death of Ideas:

Gone are the days in which law professors could be viewed as people who lived a "life of the mind."[Not being quite old enough, I am not sure they ever lived a life of the mind as much as other academicians and I suspect not.] In those days, teaching, thinking, and writing were the principal activities. Professors put their work out there and it spoke for itself. They might attend a conference or two each year and mail out a few reprints. It seems old fashion now but the process of thinking was in itself a reward. Personal recognition was a side effect.

Continue reading

October 7, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

2016 U.S. News College Rankings


US NewsU.S. News & World Report today released its 2016 College Rankings. Here are the Top 25 National Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges (along with their 2013-2015 rankings): 

2016

Rank

 

National Universities

2015

Rank

2014

Rank

2013

Rank

1

Princeton

1

1

1

2

Harvard

2

2

1

3

Yale

3

3

3

4

Columbia

4

4

4

4

Stanford

4

5

6

4

Chicago

4

5

4

7

MIT

7

7

6

8

Duke

8

7

8

9

Penn

8

7

8

10

Cal-Tech

10

10

10

10

Johns Hopkins

12

12

13

12

Dartmouth

11

10

10

12

Northwestern

13

12

12

14

Brown

16

14

15

15

Cornell

15

16

15

15

Vanderbilt

16

17

17

15

Washington (St. Louis)

14

14

14

18

Notre Dame

18

18

17

18

Rice

19

18

17

20

UC-Berkeley

20

20

21

21

Emory

21

20

20

21

Georgetown

21

20

21

23

Carnegie Mellon

25

23

23

23

UCLA

23

23

24

23

USC

25

23

24

26

Virginia

23

23

24

Pepperdine is ranked #52 (tied with Ohio State, Texas, University of Washington, and Yeshiva).

Continue reading

September 9, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (2)

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Law Schools With The Lowest Student Debt

Student Loans

Following up on my previous post, 2016 U.S News Law School Rankings: Average Student Debt:  U.S. News & World Report, 10 Law Schools That Leave Grads With the Least Debt:

SchoolAve. DebtU.S. News Rank
1. BYU $54,203 34 (tie)
2. Hawaii $56,266 82 (tie)
3. N.C. Central $58,061 Not Ranked
4. Nebraska $62,985 56 (tie)
5. Arkansas $63,541 75 (tie)
6. North Dakota $64,818 138 (tie)
7. Tennessee $66,201 52 (tie)
8. Wyoming $67,087 108 (tie)
9. Missouri $67,289 59 (tie)
10. Alabama $69,440 22 (tie)

Continue reading

September 3, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

U.S. News Law School Rankings 'Echo Chamber' Affects Peer Reputation, Lawyer/Judge Reputation, Selectivity & Tuition, But Not Employers

2016 U.S. News RankingsJeffrey Evans Stake (Indiana) & Michael Alexeev (Indiana), Who Responds to U.S. News & World Report's Law School Rankings?, 12 J. Empirical Legal Stud. 421 (2015):

U.S. News & World Report (USN&WR) publishes annual rankings of ABA‐approved law schools. The popularity of these rankings raises the question of whether they influence the behavior of law teachers, lawyers and judges, law school applicants, employers, or law school administrators. This study explores some indicia of USN&WR influence. Using data purchased from USN&WR, we attempt to determine whether USN&WR might have influenced (1) law faculty members who respond to the USN&WR survey of law school quality, (2) lawyers who respond to USN&WR surveys, (3) law school applicants choosing a school, (4) employers who hire law school graduates, and (5) administrators who set tuition.

Continue reading

September 2, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (5)

Monday, August 31, 2015

The Most Liberal And Conservative Law School Graduates

Liberal ConservativeFollowing up on Saturday's post, The Most Liberal And Conservative Lawyers By Practice Area; Law Professors Are The Most Liberal Among 61 Groups:   the paper by Adam Bonica (Stanford), Adam S. Chilton (Chicago) & Maya Sen (Harvard), The Political Ideologies of American Lawyers, also ranks law schools by the most liberal and conservative law school graduates.  Rob Anderson (Pepperdine) mines the data in this post.  Here are the Top 25 of each:

Most Liberal Law School Graduates:

  1. Charlotte
  2. Northern Illinois
  3. Howard
  4. UC-Berkeley
  5. UC-Hastings
  6. Northeastern
  7. Lewis & Clark
  8. Oregon
  9. Maine
  10. University of Washington
  11. Thurgood Marshall
  12. NYU
  13. San Francisco
  14. Golden Gate
  15. UCLA
  16. Seattle
  17. Boston University
  18. Yale
  19. Minnesota
  20. Columbia
  21. Stanford
  22. Pennsylvania
  23. Illinois
  24. New Mexico
  25. USC

Most Conservative Law School Graduates:

Continue reading

August 31, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

The 69 Most-Cited Law Faculties

Gregory C. Sisk (University of St. Thomas) et al.,  Scholarly Impact of Law School Faculties in 2015: Updating the Leiter Score Ranking for the Top Third:

This study explores the scholarly impact of law faculties, ranking the top third of ABA-accredited law schools. Refined by Professor Brian Leiter, the “Scholarly Impact Score” for a law faculty is calculated from the mean and the median of total law journal citations over the past five years to the work of tenured members of that law faculty. In addition to a school-by-school ranking, we report the mean, median, and weighted score, along with a listing of the tenured law faculty members at each ranked law school with the ten highest individual citation counts.

1.   Yale
2.   Harvard
3.   Chicago
4.   NYU
5.   Stanford
6.   UC-Irvine
7.   Columbia
8.   Duke
9.   Vanderbilt, UC-Berkeley
11.  Pennsylvania
12.  Northwestern
13.  Cornell, UCLA
15.  Michigan, Georgetown
17.  Virginia, George Washington
19.  Minnesota
20.  Texas
21.  George Mason, Washington University, Boston University
24.  UC-Davis
25.  Case Western, Notre Dame
27.  Illinois, Emory
29.  Cardozo, Arizona, Colorado, Ohio State
33.  North Carolina, Brooklyn
35.  Indiana, Utah, Fordham, San Diego
39.  Florida State, Arizona State, USC, St. Thomas, Iowa
44.  UC-Hastings, William & Mary, Maryland
47.  BYU, Hofstra, Washington & Lee
50.  UNLV, Pittsburgh
52.  Temple, Wake Forest, Florida, Chicago-Kent, Alabama
57.  Georgia, Houston, Loyola-L.A., American, Boston College
62.  Missouri, Toledo
64.  DePaul, Rutgers-Camden, Kansas, Tulane, Hawaii, San Francisco

Here are the 16 Tax Profs among the 10-most cited faculty at the Top 69 law schools:

2.   Harvard:  Louis Kaplow
15.  Michigan: Reuven Avi-Yonah
19.  Minnesota:  Kristin Hickman
24.  UC-Davis:  Dennis Ventry
29.  Cardozo: Ed Zelinsky
33.  North Carolina:  Gregg Polsky
35.  Indiana:  Leandra Lederman; San Diego:  Vic Fleischer
39.  USC:  Ed Kleinbard, Ed McCaffery
47.  BYU:  Cliff Fleming
52.  Temple:  Nancy Knauer; Chicago-Kent: Evelyn Brody
57.  Loyola-L.A.:  Ellen Aprill
64.  Tulane: Marjorie Kornhauser; San Francisco: Joshua Rosenberg

Several law faculties achieve Scholarly Impact Scores well above the rankings reported by U.S. News:

Continue reading

August 11, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Scholarship, Tax | Permalink | Comments (8)

Thursday, August 6, 2015

2015-16 ExpressO Law Review Rankings

Expresso2015-16 ExpressO Law Review Rankings:

The following list of [100] reviews represents the most popular law reviews chosen by authors using ExpressO, according to 2014 delivery data. These rankings are intended to complement, not replace, other ranking mechanisms such as the number of citations and law school ranking.

  1. Ohio State Law Journal
  2. Hastings Law Journal
  3. Washington and Lee Law Review
  4. University of Pennsylvania Law Review
  5. Cornell Law Review
  6. University of Illinois Law Review
  7. Washington University Law Review
  8. Georgetown Law Journal
  9. University of Colorado Law Review
  10. Alabama Law Review
  11. George Mason Law Review
  12. Brooklyn Law Review
  13. American University Law Review
  14. Washington Law Review
  15. Florida State University Law Review
  16. Florida Law Review
  17. DePaul Law Review
  18. Michigan State Law Review
  19. University of Richmond Law Review
  20. Missouri Law Review
  21. Oregon Law Review
  22. Buffalo Law Review
  23. Boston University Law Review
  24. Penn State Law Review
  25. Rutgers University Law Review

(Hat Tip: Francine Lipman.)

August 6, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Manhire: Beyond The U.S. News Index — A Better Measure Of Law School Diversity

2016 U.S. News RankingsJ.T. Manhire (Texas A&M), Beyond the U.S. News Index: A Better Measure of Law School Diversity, 101 Iowa L. Rev. Online ___  (2015):

The U.S. News & World Report publishes a diversity index along with its annual ranking of U.S. law schools. Race and ethnicity are the only factors the magazine uses to measure law school diversity. But is this a meaningful measure of student difference? Are race and ethnicity all that count or are there other differences that contribute to a richer educational experience for students and better outcomes for law schools? In a 2011 Iowa Law Review article, Kevin Johnson argues that law school diversity is not limited to only race and ethnicity. He further argues that law school diversity, defined broadly, is critical to the success of legal education; both for the students and the institutions that serve them.

Yet, the epistemological question remains: how do law schools know how diverse their student bodies are? If law student diversity is more than just racial diversity, the current U.S. News index is incomplete and fails to provide a meaningful law school diversity measure. This essay proposes an improved diversity index that captures more of the differences that matter to the success of both law students and law schools. The essay begins by very briefly recapping some of Dean Johnson’s compelling arguments for why law school diversity (in its broader conception) is critical, and why measuring it is so important. It then examines the types of differences shown to produce better outcomes in heterogeneous groups, and explains the methodology behind the proposed cognitive diversity index.

July 14, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (3)

Monday, July 6, 2015

Lipshaw: Law Schools Whose Rankings Are Helped (Or Hurt) By Their Law Reviews

Following up on last week's post, 2015 Brophy Law School Rankings: Median LSAT, Full-Time J.D.-Required Jobs, And Law Review Citations:  

Jeff Lipshaw (Suffolk), Playing With Al Brophy's Alternative Law School Rankings - Student Centered vs. Student/Scholarship Centered Results:

Al did two analyses, one using only the student variables (LSAT and employment - the "2 var" rank) and one using all three (the "3 var rank").  His Table 2 shows the relative 2 var and 3 var rank for each school, but his comparison are all as against USNWR.  I was interested in "law review lift" versus "law review drag."   So I made a list from Al's Table 2, arbitrarily taking a difference of ten or more as the cutoff.

After the jump, you can see a list of [38] schools whose ranking with their law reviews improves by ten spots or more (law review lift) or [36 schools] whose ranking drops by ten spots or more when the law review gets included (law review drag).  I'll leave it to you to theorize about meaning, if any.

Continue reading

July 6, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Rethinking Measures Of Quality And Value In The U.S. News Law School Rankings

2016 U.S. News RankingsChristopher J. Ryan (Vanderbilt), Crunching the Numbers: Rethinking Measures of Quality and Value in National Law School Rankings:

Rankings have become an important, if not essential, element of the law school environment since U.S. News & World Report (“U.S. News”) first began publishing law school rankings in 1987. Since the rankings’ first publication, a new fixation on standings took hold of pre-law school consumers, as well as legal academe, coinciding with a historic rise in law school applicants, students, and graduates.However, in the wake of the Great Recession, since 2013, the law school luster has dulled, due in part to increased concern over increasing tuition and student debt, concurrent with diminishing prospects of employment upon graduation. As these disturbing trends illustrate, both the legal profession and legal education are at a crossroads. Still — and perhaps because of legal education has historically been slow to evolve — the U.S. News rankings are an important, if not essential, element of the new law school environment. While several alternative rankings have begun to gain traction in recent years, for better or for worse, the U.S. News ranking has become the “gold standard of the ranking business,” as well as a proxy for determining a law school’s quality and value.

Good ranking systems help consumers of information determine quality and value; however, many have attacked the U.S. News methodology — whose quality assessment, a survey of scholars and lawyers for their ranking of an institution’s reputation, accounts for 40%, whose measures of selectivity comprising 25%, and whose measures of student and faculty diversity account for 0% of a law school’s total score — and its standard of law school rankings as both a product and a source of stagnation in legal education (Arewa, et al., 2013 [Enduring Hierarchies in Legal Education, 89 Ind. L.J. 941]; Morris & Henderson, 2008 [Measuring Outcomes: Post-Graduation Measures of Success in the U.S. News & World Report Law School Rankings, 83 Ind. L.J. 791]; Black & Caron, 2006 [Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83]). New measures assessing institutional quality and value, as well as diversity, can and should be developed to address the relevancy of legal education in the 21st Century.

Continue reading

July 2, 2015 in Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink | Comments (1)