TaxProf Blog

Editor: Paul L. Caron, Dean
Pepperdine University School of Law

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

ABA Finds Appalachian, Arizona Summit & North Carolina Central Law Schools Out Of Compliance With Accreditation Standards

AANABA Journal, North Carolina Central, Arizona Summit Found Out of Compliance With ABA Accreditation Standards:

The ABA’s Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar recently notified two law schools—North Carolina Central University School of Law and Arizona Summit Law School—that they were not in compliance with specific accreditation standards. Additionally, the section released a December 2017 accreditation committee decision that the Appalachian School of Law remains noncompliant with Standards 501(a) and 501(b), which deal with law school admissions. ...

Phyliss Craig-Taylor, dean of North Carolina Central University School of Law, did not respond to an ABA Journal request for comment. ... “Last week, we completed a second multimillion dollar capital raise to solidify the school’s financial position. We also have reduced cost structure commensurate with plans to maintain a substantially downsized school. Shortly, we will be notifying the ABA of these developments with an updated report,” Donald Lively, president of Arizona Summit, told the ABA Journal. ... Sandra Keen McGlothlin, interim dean of Appalachian, did not respond to an ABA Journal request for comment.

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2018/01/aba-finds-appalachian-arizona-summit-north-carolina-central-law-schools-out-of-compliance-with-accre.html

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Comments

The ABA is out of line targeting schools that provide opportunities to disadvantaged students. Although graduates of these schools are not qualified for jobs with prestigious law firms or Article III clerkships, they can handle the unmet legal needs of the middle class and poor. Graduates of say Arizona Summit, can open a solo practice and handle less challenging legal tasks, such as writing a will for a middle class family or representing an indigent client in a landlord-tenant dispute. These graduates can lift themselves out of poverty and earn six figure salaries. They come from families that are counting on legal education to lift the family up into the middle class.

Graduates of access schools can also earn a substantial wage premium in other fields such as business. Non-legal employers know that law school graduates are trained by the best and brightest thinkers. Law schools only hire individuals possessing elite credentials to teach law students. A law school education provides graduates with the critical thinking skills and problem solving skills to enter almost any field. A disadvantaged individual lacking educational opportunities but possessing a JD, can earn more than the privileged individual possessing only a terminal bachelor’s degree.

Posted by: Access | Jan 9, 2018 1:41:56 PM

"The ABA is out of line targeting schools that provide opportunities to disadvantaged students."

Meanwhile in reality, the ABA has been so lax in its accreditation duties that it nearly had those powers yanked from it last year, as was reported here and elsewhere at the time.

"Graduates of access schools can also earn a substantial wage premium in other fields such as business. "

Dude, Arizona Summit didn't even exist until nearly the last year of data for that purported wage premium study, and wasn't accredited until years afterwards. Your methodological flaws are showing.

"Graduates of access schools can also earn a substantial wage premium in other fields such as business. Non-legal employers know that law school graduates are trained by the best and brightest thinkers."

Weird, none of my law school professors were theoretical physicists.

Posted by: Unemployed Northeastern | Jan 9, 2018 9:37:37 PM

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