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Editor: Paul L. Caron, Dean
Pepperdine University School of Law

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Charleston President Touts Rebirth Of Law School With 150% Enrollment Boost, Removal From DOE's 'Naughty List'; He Urges Graduates To Work As Policemen And Firemen

Charleston Logo (2017)Following up on my previous post, Charleston, Florida Coastal Law Schools Fail 'Gainful Employment' Test, Will Lose Federal Student Loans If They Fail Again Next Year; Three Other Law Schools In Danger Zone:  Post and Courier, Charleston School of Law Off U.S. Education Department's 'Naughty' List:

Several years after the Charleston School of Law became engulfed in chaos over a pending sale to a private company, its president says the institution has rebounded in enrollment and finances.

"The school is turning around quicker than anyone could imagine," President Ed Bell said Friday. "We literally thought it would take four to five years, but we've done it in less than two."

Bell noted that in October 2015, the school had only 82 members in its freshman class. Last year, that had climbed to 202, and he said he expects between 200 and 225 this fall. ...

Meanwhile, the law school's Financial Ratio Responsibility score — a federal benchmark of a school's financial health — rose from a failing minus 0.6 in 2014 and 2015, to 2.6 last year, he said. A school must score a 1.5 or higher to avoid getting on the department's so-called "naughty list." The Department of Education has not published its 2015-16 list.

"We've made some good decisions. We've kept our cost in check. ... We've hired back our professors," he said. "We made a little money last year, and all of that is being plowed back into school. We're building our facilities, improving our library and improving our course schedule." ...

The Charleston School of Law's low points came as it wrestled with student and faculty blowback over a plan to sell the for-profit school to InfiLaw, a Naples, Florida-based consortium of lower-tier law schools. Instead, Bell, a Georgetown lawyer, took over in 2015 and is leading a transition to a nonprofit. ... It was able to pay off a $6 million debt to InfilLaw while keeping tuition in check. Tuition for the upcoming year is $40,596.

The school is appealing its failing rating on another federal list that compares graduates' incomes with their student debt. Bell said his goal is that future students can cut their student debt in half within five years — without abandoning the school's emphasis on encouraging graduates to take unconventional jobs, at least at first.

"We encourage students immediately after getting out of school just to take a couple of years and give back," he said. "Go be a policeman, go be a fireman. Go work as a law clerk. A lot of these are low-paying jobs, but it teaches them something they will take with them for the rest of their lives."

"As of July 1, we'll be off the list and we will never get back on it again, according to what we've been told by DOE," he said. A spokesman at the department provided only the current rankings and would not verify Bell's claim.

Here are Charleston's admissions statistics for the past seven years:

Charlotte Stats

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Comments

Yes, but LSATs are down two points at the 25th to 141. Probably half the class is at high risk of bar failure, and very few can be said to have a good chance of passing. I wish all those students luck, but I don't think one can conclude that the school is successful until we know how many pass the bar and enter the profession.,.

Posted by: Anon | Jun 18, 2017 5:35:05 PM

Yes, but LSATs are down two points at the 25th to 141. Probably half the class is at high risk of bar failure, and very few can be said to have a good chance of passing. I wish all those students luck, but I don't think one can conclude that the school is successful until we know how many pass the bar and enter the profession.,.

Posted by: Anon | Jun 18, 2017 5:35:09 PM

Student quality was definitely sacrificed in favor of gaining tuition revenue. This trend can have no good result.

Posted by: Old Ruster | Jun 19, 2017 10:15:08 AM

Take out 200k in debt to get a JD to become a cop or fireman. Brilliant. Do the law schools consider fireman a 'jd advantage' position?

Posted by: Lonnie | Jun 19, 2017 2:46:43 PM

This is insane. The law school's leadership is priding itself on what amounts to misleading the new students and to show clearly that many of the students aren't the brightest bulbs in the pack, they actually enrolled in the law school. This is an absolute failure by the ABA and the Federal government's loan program that will see default after default and throwing money away on pretty much hopeless cases.

Posted by: David | Jun 20, 2017 8:12:36 AM