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Saturday, August 9, 2014

Princeton and Wellesley May Re-inflate Grades

P-WPrinceton and Wellesley are considering reversing actions they took a decade ago to curb grade inflation:  Princeton capped A-range grades at 35%, and Wellesley imposed a mandatory B+ median in introductory (100) level and intermediate (200) level courses with at least 10 students:

Princeton, Report from the Ad Hoc Committee to Review Policies Regarding Assessment and Grading:

Princeton

Wellesley, The Effects of an Anti-Grade-Inflation Policy at Wellesley College:

Wellesley

 Wellesley

Update:  The Economist, What the Ivies Can Learn From Wellesley

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2014/08/princeton-and-wellesley-.html

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Comments

If your degree is in Women's Studies you had better get a good GPA because that's about all your getting out of your 4 years of college.

Posted by: FrancisChalk | Aug 11, 2014 2:02:51 AM

If I was teaching, I'd give everyone an A+ grade, and add a side-note with the grade I would have given them if I wasn't so concerned about their transcripts. They would not all be A+...

Posted by: Larry | Aug 11, 2014 1:10:53 PM

Did anybody notice that most of the courses with no grade inflation were STEM, and most of the courses with the worst grade inflation were leftie dominated subjects.

Posted by: richard40 | Aug 11, 2014 2:17:16 PM

The bar graph would be revealing if it were not so predictable.

Posted by: Mike Petrik | Aug 11, 2014 2:21:24 PM

I have to believe that most students at Princeton, if graded against objective criteria, rather than on a curve, are more than capable and motivated to achieve high grades in all of their courses...I just don't see there being many slackers/under performers, other than the occasional legacy trust fund brat...

Posted by: Anon | Aug 11, 2014 4:58:59 PM

@richard40 - When did the right embrace the sciences? Could it be that the STEM courses offer more objective grading material? Perhaps a paper discussing the impact of an historic figure is slightly more difficult to assess against other similar but varied papers than say seeing if everyone knows 2 + 2.

Posted by: Daniel | Aug 12, 2014 6:13:09 AM