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Thursday, August 28, 2014

Law School Rankings by BigLaw Associates' Satisfaction With Their Legal Education

American Lawyer LogoAmerican Lawyer, Which Schools Produce the Most Satisfied Big-Firm Lawyers?:

As part of our Midlevel Associates Survey, we asked respondents to rate their law schools on how well they prepared them for firm life on a five-point scale, with 5 being the highest possible score. Of all the questions on the survey, this is the one that correlated most strongly with overall job satisfaction. Below are the law schools that had 20 or more respondents to the survey, ranked by the average scores their alumni gave them on this question. The 53 schools that qualified had a total of 4,767 respondents, who gave them an average score of 3.74. Differences in score of 0.05 or less between schools are not statistically significant.

AmLaw Rank

School (Respondents)

Score

US News Rank

1

Duke (79)

4.18

10

1

Michigan (117)

4.18

10

3

Loyola-L.A. (46)

4.17

87

4

Stanford (73)

4.15

3

4

Chicago (87)

4.15

4

6

William & Mary (23)

4.13

24

7

Emory (42)

4.12

19

7

Vanderbilt (34)

4.12

16

9

Virginia (133)

4.06

8

10

Northwestern (108)

4.05

12

11

Georgia (23)

4.04

29

12

Houston (20)

4.00

58

12

Illinois (30)

4.00

40

14

Texas (83)

3.98

15

15

Catholic (23)

3.96

107

15

SMU (27)

3.96

42

17

Temple (43)

3.95

61

17

Washington U. (40)

3.95

18

19

Notre Dame (35)

3.94

26

20

Florida (33)

3.91

49

T14 schools that fared poorly in the ranking: Yale (24), Cornell (28), NYU (35), Penn (37), Harvard (42), Columbia (43), Georgetown (44).

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2014/08/law-school-rankings-.html

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Comments

I find it interesting that a school like Loyola Los Angeles had more respondents than Harvard or Georgetown. There must easily be 25 Harvard or Georgetown big law mid levels out there for every Loyola one.

That said, perhaps Loyola is doing a really good job of preparing its students for big law settings (and law practice in general), problem is, so few of its graduates will ever get a shot at practicing at large firms....(barely 7% or so get a "big law" job, from the reports I've seen in recent years). Maybe that will change?

Posted by: Anon | Aug 28, 2014 1:15:37 PM

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