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Pepperdine University School of Law

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Monday, June 16, 2014

Leiter's Top Ten Law Faculty (By Area) In Scholarly Impact, 2009-2013

Following up on Friday's post, The 10 Most-Cited Tax Faculty:  Brian Leiter (Chicago) has relased on his Law School Rankings website (a member of our Law Professor Blogs Network) an updated ranking of the 10 Most-Cited U.S. Law Faculty in 11 areas of specialization, as measured by citations during the past five years (2009-2013).

Interestingly, the 14 Tax Profs listed in the 10-Most Cited Tax Faculty and the related Highly Cited Scholars Who Work Partly in Tax lists are younger than their counterparts in the 10 other areas of specializations:  in tax, four are in their 40s, nine are in their 50s, and only one is in his 60s. 

Rank

Tax Prof

Citations

Age

1

Michael Graetz (Columbia)

400

69

 

David Weisbach (Chicago)

400

50

3

Reuven Avi-Yonah (Michigan)

350

56

4

Daniel Shaviro (NYU)

340

56

5

Leandra Lederman (Indiana)

290

47

 

Larry Zelenak (Duke)

290

58

7

Victor Fleischer (San Diego)

280

42

8

Edward Zelinsky (Cardozo)

270

58

9

Joseph Bankman (Stanford)

250

58

 

Edward McCaffery (USC)

250

55

 

Highly Cited Scholars Who Work Partly in Tax

 

 

 

Louis Kaplow (Harvard)

1100

57

 

Brian Galle (Boston College)

310

43

 

Kristin Hickman (Minnesota)

310

43

 

Mark Gergen (UC-Berkeley)

270

57

Prior TaxProf Blog coverage:

In our article, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83, 120-22 (2006), Bernie Black (Northwestern) and I examined the Top 25 tax faculty as measured by SSRN downloads, a practice I update monthly on TaxProf Blog.

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2014/06/leiters-.html

Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink

Comments

I checked the Leiter survey again. Cass Sunstein has been cited 5000 times in the equivalent period, or significantly more than all the cited tax scholars together. Everyone in the overall top 10 has been cited more than four times as much as the most frequently cited tax scholar. I personally think the entire "rankings" concept (downloads, citations, etc.) is adolescent in nature--like saying Lady Gaga is better than Mozart--but if we are to engage it we should at least be aware of what it tells us. For tax scholars, the message is pretty clear.

Posted by: michael livingston | Jun 17, 2014 6:13:02 AM