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Monday, February 24, 2014

Income Inequality, by State, 1917-2011

Economic Analysis and Research Network, The Increasingly Unequal States of America: Income Inequality by State, 1917-2011:

[A]ll 50 states have experienced widening income inequality in recent decades.  ... Between 1979 and 2007, the top 1 percent took home well over half (53.9 percent) of the total increase in U.S. income. Over this period, the average income of the bottom 99 percent of U.S. taxpayers grew by 18.9 percent. Simultaneously, the average income of the top 1 percent grew over 10 times as much—by 200.5 percent.

Table 1
 

Income growth from 1979 to 2007, overall and for the top 1% and bottom 99%, U.S. and by state and region

  Average real income growth 
Rank (by top 1% income growth)State/regionOverallTop 1%Bottom 99%Share of total growth (or loss) captured by top 1%
 1 Connecticut 72.6% 414.6% 29.5% 63.9%
 2 Massachusetts 82.1% 366.0% 51.7% 43.1%
 3 New York 60.5% 355.1% 22.2% 67.6%
 4 Wyoming 31.5% 354.3% -0.8% 102.3%
 5 New Jersey 62.6% 264.7% 41.3% 40.3%
 6 Washington 31.2% 222.3% 13.9% 59.1%
 7 Florida 38.8% 218.8% 13.8% 68.9%
 8 Vermont 42.4% 217.0% 27.8% 39.5%
 9 South Dakota 44.8% 216.0% 30.5% 37.2%
10 New Hampshire 53.2% 215.9% 37.6% 35.5%
11 Utah 31.0% 214.9% 15.4% 54.1%
12 Virginia 58.2% 214.8% 44.6% 29.5%
13 Illinois 31.4% 211.6% 12.2% 64.9%
14 Maryland 51.0% 202.1% 37.0% 33.6%
15 Colorado 37.4% 200.8% 21.2% 48.3%
16 Idaho 30.1% 197.6% 16.3% 49.9%
17 California 31.5% 191.8% 13.2% 62.4%
18 Pennsylvania 40.0% 184.9% 25.2% 42.8%
19 Tennessee 35.3% 178.0% 20.2% 48.4%
20 Minnesota 44.4% 175.9% 30.9% 36.8%
21 North Carolina 44.8% 172.0% 32.1% 34.8%
22 Georgia 37.5% 170.9% 23.5% 43.3%
23 Rhode Island 53.8% 170.3% 40.4% 32.6%
24 Nevada 8.6% 164.0% -11.6% 218.5%
25 South Carolina 25.4% 163.5% 12.8% 54.0%
26 Nebraska 43.5% 160.3% 31.8% 33.5%
27 Alabama 33.7% 158.8% 20.5% 44.9%
28 Arizona 17.0% 157.8% 3.0% 84.2%
29 Wisconsin 28.5% 150.4% 17.4% 44.0%
30 Oklahoma 33.9% 149.6% 20.3% 46.6%
31 Maine 39.9% 149.4% 30.2% 30.5%
32 North Dakota 33.7% 147.8% 24.0% 34.2%
33 Montana 22.3% 146.8% 10.9% 55.2%
34 Missouri 31.9% 140.5% 20.3% 42.5%
35 Kansas 37.0% 132.3% 26.6% 35.0%
36 Oregon 13.5% 127.2% 2.7% 81.8%
37 Texas 26.6% 124.1% 13.5% 55.3%
38 Delaware 31.5% 122.6% 21.2% 39.7%
39 Arkansas 35.0% 121.6% 25.6% 34.0%
40 New Mexico 14.0% 119.3% 4.2% 72.6%
41 Alaska -10.3% 118.6% -17.5% Ŧ
42 Hawaii 12.4% 118.0% 3.9% 70.9%
43 Indiana 21.4% 115.3% 12.6% 46.5%
44 Ohio 20.4% 111.2% 11.3% 49.4%
45 Iowa 30.9% 110.5% 23.7% 29.8%
46 Kentucky 19.9% 105.1% 11.2% 48.8%
47 Michigan 8.9% 100.0% -0.2% 101.7%
48 Mississippi 31.8% 93.4% 24.8% 29.8%
49 Louisiana 35.4% 84.6% 29.5% 25.6%
50 West Virginia 12.9% 74.1% 6.6% 53.3%
 6* District of Columbia 88.1% 239.4% 65.8% 34.8%
  United States 36.9% 200.5% 18.9% 53.9%
  Northeast 59.0% 301.2% 31.0% 52.9%
  Midwest 26.5% 147.1% 14.4% 50.7%
  South 37.6% 167.5% 22.6% 46.1%
  West 27.3% 186.2% 10.5% 65.2%

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Comments

It sounds like some "liberal" states aren't so liberal

Posted by: michael livingston | Feb 25, 2014 4:34:00 AM