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Tuesday, June 25, 2013

The American Legal Profession in Crisis: Resistance and Responses to Change

MoliternoJames E. Moliterno (Washington & Lee), The American Legal Profession in Crisis: Resistance and Responses to Change (Oxford University Press, 2013):

  • Helps the reader understand the full range of the broad history of the legal profession
  • Focuses on and explains discrete historical periods and important crisis points in American legal history
  • Makes provocative recommendations and prescriptions for reform for the entire legal profession
  • Identifies the underlying causes of the legal profession's anachronism in response to change

For more, see:

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2013/06/the-american-.html

Book Club, Legal Education | Permalink

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Comments

When people start labeling those who disagree with them as "resistant to change," it's a good sign their arguments aren't very convicing.

Posted by: michael livingston | Jun 25, 2013 8:50:09 AM

Michael L - What is a better term for those who routinely defend the status quo?

Posted by: Kipper | Jun 25, 2013 10:11:52 AM

Why do we need an entire book on this topic? There is nothing wrong with legal education other than the price. It is abosolutely amazing that legal academics are using the current crisis as an opportunity for grandstanding and book-writing, as opposed to acknowledging the only solution (cutting costs) and moving forward. There is no longer a shred of doubt in my mind that the majority or law schools will not exist in 10 years, and that the majority of state bar associations will not exist in 20 years. Someone like Malcolm Gladwell or Jared Diamond will one day write a book arguing that the inability of the law school professoriate and administration to address the obvious flaws in its system was one of the most clear examples of humankind's failures in the last century. In fact, this whole situation is very reminiscent of the book Collapse.

Posted by: JM | Jun 25, 2013 3:23:03 PM