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Monday, April 8, 2013

NLJ: Which Law Schools Are Tops for Jobs?

NLJNational Law Journal:  Which Law Schools Are Tops for Jobs?:

During the past two years, the ABA has significantly increased the amount and detail of information it requires law schools to report about job placement. It also has worked to get the information to the public much faster — the better to guide law school applicants. The organization breaks down the types of jobs graduates have landed and whether they are full-time, long-term or short-term positions, and identifies the three states where graduates of each law school were most likely to find work. The key takeaway is that the job market for new lawyers improved not much at all in 2012.

Read This If You Want a Legal Job
George Washington sent nearly 23% its class of 2012 into jobs paid for by the school itself. Rutgers–Camden sent the largest percentage of its class to state court clerkships. Those are among the thousands of nuggets of information contained in a data trove released recently by the ABA.

Where the Jobs Are
These 20 law schools placed the highest percentage of their 2012 graduates in full-time, long-term jobs that require bar passage.

Large-Firm Jobs
Want to work in Big Law? These law schools sent the highest percentages of their class of 2012 into permanent, full-time jobs at law firms of 100 or more lawyers.

Unemployed
These law schools had the highest percentage of their class of 2012 who were seeking jobs but had not secured any employment nine months after graduation.

Falling short of the Dream
Unemployment figures alone don’t offer a complete picture of law grads struggling the most on the job market because they exclude graduates in temporary or part-time work, or graduates in nonprofessional jobs.

School-Funded Jobs
These law schools had the highest percentage of 2012 graduates in jobs that were financed by the school itself.

Government and Public Interest
These law schools sent the highest percentage of their class of 2012 into either government jobs, such as prosecutors, or public interest jobs, such as public defenders or nonprofit attorneys.

Federal Clerkships
These schools sent the largest percentage of their class of 2012 into clerkships with federal judges.

State Clerkships
These schools sent the largest percentage of their class of 2012 into clerkships with state judges.

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Comments

The "bar requirement" is a little misleading, because many jobs for banks, consulting firms, and finance firms are not bar required but have career prospects and repayment capabilities roughly equivalent to biglaw firms. This effect will be magnified for NY-centric schools and business-centric law schools. For example, Northwestern Law has something like 10% of JDs in the JD-MBA program, the vast majority of whom find employment on the business side rather than law side.

Posted by: NL7 | Apr 8, 2013 2:36:57 PM

There is a high correlation between a school that sends large numbers of grads to state court clerkships and the quality of the state's judiciary. States with relatively well-funded and professional state judiciaries hire law clerks--states with less well-funded, less well-paid judges, and less professional judiciaries do not. The law schools and their grads from the former benefit from the larger number of clerkships--as do the judicial systems themselves.

Posted by: Publius Novus | Apr 11, 2013 6:37:51 AM