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Monday, February 4, 2013

New Dilbert Character: Stanky Bathturd, IRS Agent

Dilbert 2Dilbert Blog:  You Be the Editor, by Scott Adams:

I'm working on some Dilbert strips that will be published in early April. The series will feature a new character that works for the government and looks like a monster. His job is to make the tax code more complicated for no reason, with Dogbert's help of course. My problem is the name I've given this character: Stanky Bathturd.

(Hat Tip: Eric A. Chiappinelli.)

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2013/02/new-dilbert.html

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Comments

This is a ridiculous and unfair concept. IRS agents do not make the tax law more complicated--they are the poor bastards who must attempt to figure it out. Making the law more complicated is the exclusive realm of lobbists and their wholly owned subsidiaries in Congress.

Posted by: Publius Novus | Feb 4, 2013 7:13:27 AM

I completely agree with the previous post. Revenue agents have a thankless task, and anyone who suggests, even in a comic strip, that they are responsible for tax complexity is way off target.

Posted by: Mark | Feb 4, 2013 11:15:19 AM

Publius must never have tried to wade through 150+ page IRS Regulations!

Posted by: Doug | Feb 4, 2013 11:45:50 AM

PN, Adams didn't say that the government character was an IRS agent. The new character simply represents the tax code and those who make it worse. I think that they could play off the IRS's electronic filing acronym of EFIN and name the character "Efin D'Code."

Posted by: Woody | Feb 4, 2013 1:26:36 PM

Dilbert says he works for the government, not that he is an IRS agent. I believe that the people responsible for writing both the tax code and the Regulations do indeed work for the government.

Posted by: Todd | Feb 4, 2013 4:50:42 PM