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Saturday, June 16, 2012

ABA: Only 55.2% of the Class of 2011 Have Full-Time Long-Term Legal Jobs

Law School Transparency:  Class of 2011 Legal Employment and Underemployment Numbers Are In, and Far Worse Than Expected:

Mister Hart, here is a dime. Take it, call your mother, and tell her there is serious doubt about you ever becoming a lawyer.
- Kingsfield, The Paper Chase

The ABA has released Class of 2011 job outcome data for all domestic ABA-approved law schools. The data are far more granular than ever before. Law School Transparency has analyzed the data and made the school-specific data available on its website for easy comparison.

The ABA data shed considerable light on how poorly the 2011 graduates fared. We can now say with certainty that the employment picture is far worse than previously reported. Only 55.2% of all graduates were known to be employed in full-time, long-term legal jobs. A devastating 26.4% of all graduates were underemployed.

Here are the Top 25 and Bottom 25 law schools ranked by the percentage of the Class of 2011 with full-time long-term legal jobs:

 

 

School (U.S News Rank)

Full-Time Job %

 School (U.S News Rank)

Full-Time Job %

1

Virginia (7)

94.7%

171.  Phoenix (Tier 2)

37.4%

2

Columbia (4)

94.1%

172.  Southern (Tier 2)

37.1%

3

Stanford (2)

91.1%

173.  CUNY (113)

36.9%

4

NYU (6)

90.1%

174.  Detroit (Tier 2) 

36.8%

5

Harvard (3)

90.1%

175.  Florida Coastal (Tier 2)

36.6%

6

Chicago (5)

88.2%

176.  Toledo (129)

36.5%

7

Yale (1)

87.8%

177.  N. Kentucky (Tier 2)

36.3%

8

Pennsylvania (7)

84.3%

178.  Pace (142)

36.0%

9

Duke (11)

82.1%

179.  American (49)

35.5%

10

G. Washington (20)

81.3%

180.  NY Law School (135)

35.5%

11

LSU (79)

81.3%

181.  Quinnipiac (113)

34.6%

12

UC-Berkeley (7)

80.0%

182.  Southwestern (129)

34.6%

13

St. Mary's (Tier 2)

78.3%

183.  New England (Tier 2)

34.4%

14

Alabama (29)

78.0%

184.  San Francisco (106)

34.2%

15

Northwestern (12)

77.0%

185.  Florida A&M (Tier 2)

34.2%

16

Cornell (14)

76.1%

186.  Ave Maria (Tier 2)

33.0%

17

Michigan (10)

75.5%

187.  La Verne (Tier 2)

32.8%

18

Mississippi College (Tier 2)

75.3%

188.  Western St. (Tier 2)

32.2%

19

Arizona (43)

75.3%

189.  Liberty (Tier 2)

31.1%

20

Vanderbilt (16)

73.7%

190.  Appalachian (Tier 2)

30.8%

21

Kentucky (62)

71.9%

191.  Western N.E. (Tier 2)

30.1%

22

Campbell (Tier 2)

71.4%

192.  T. Jefferson (Tier 2)

26.0%

23

Baylor (51)

70.1%

193.  Golden Gate (Tier 2)

22.0%

24

Texas (16)

69.9%

194.  D.C. (Tier 2)

20.5%

25

Florida State (51)

69.5%

195.  Whittier (Tier 2)

17.1%

Schools ranked in the U.S. News Top 35 with the largest underperformance in the full-time long-term legal job rankings:

  • - 86:  Boston University (26, 112)
  • - 82:  U. Washington (20, 102)
  • - 80:  Illinois (35, 115)
  • - 72:  Indiana-Bloomington (26, 98)
  • - 68:  Washington & Lee (24, 92)
  • - 60:  William & Mary (35, 95)
  • - 54:  UC-Davis (29, 83)
  • - 50:  Fordham (29, 79)
  • - 51:  Minnesota (19, 70)
  • - 49:  Washington U. (23, 72) 
  • - 41:  UCLA (15, 56)
  • - 37:  Georgetown (13, 50)
  • - 32:  Notre Dame (22, 54)
  • - 22:  USC (18, 40)

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Comments

This is very interesting, I wonder if this could become an alternative ranking system to rival the traditional one. My own school, Ohio State, is ranked quite a bit lower by this method (70s).

Posted by: Steven | Jun 16, 2012 1:06:41 PM

The problem with these statistics is that they don't count people who take policy jobs that don't require a JD but that having a JD gave them an advantage of their competition. So, for example, I suspect a lot of people who went to the D.C. area schools took policy jobs, which lowers the ranking of their school.

Posted by: A bit misleading | Jun 17, 2012 1:52:51 PM