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Pepperdine University School of Law

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Monday, March 12, 2012

The Three Keys to Faculty Performance (and Satisfaction): Autonomy, Mastery & Purpose

From my friend and co-blogger Bill Henderson (Indiana) on our sister blog, The Legal Whiteboard: check out this video from Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, by Daniel H. Pink:

DriveForget everything you thought you knew about how to motivate people--at work, at school, at home. It's wrong. As Daniel H. Pink explains in his new and paradigm-shattering book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today's world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.

Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does--and how that affects every aspect of our lives. He demonstrates that while the old-fashioned carrot-and-stick approach worked successfully in the 20th century, it's precisely the wrong way to motivate people for today's challenges. In Drive, he reveals the three elements of true motivation:

* Autonomy:  The desire to direct our own lives
* Mastery:  The urge to get better and better at something that matters
* Purpose:  The yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2012/03/the-three-keys.html

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Comments

It's a great video, but don't professors already have tremendous autonomy? And don't they have as much urge to get better, and sense of purpose as individuals working in other professions? While I sense that implementation of these ideas could spark creativity and job satisfaction in many occupations, I'm not sure how it works for (law) profs.

Posted by: Simon Canick | Mar 13, 2012 1:53:56 PM