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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

31% Law School 'Tax' at Baltimore Is More Than Twice What University Claimed

Baltimore LogoNational Law Journal, Law School 'Tax' at Baltimore More Than Twice What University Claimed:

When Phillip Closius was forced out as dean of the University of Baltimore School of Law in July, he publicly accused university officials of raiding law school funds to subsidize other academic programs.

University President Robert Bogomolny denied the charges, claiming that the broader campus took just 14% of the revenue generated by the law school during the 2010-11 academic year — not the 45% Closius claimed.

Now an analysis prepared by the Maryland Department of Legislative Services has discovered that Baltimore's law school indeed has been something of a cash cow for the university.

The law school in 2010 sent $8.8 million, nearly 31% of its revenue, into the general university budget, according to the analysis. By comparison, the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law — the state's only other public law school — sent slightly more than 11% of its revenue back to the larger university, at $2.8 million. ... [T]he percentage of law school tuition money going to the university grew in 2011, when a tuition increase generated an additional $1.45 million in revenue — only about $80,000 of which went back to the law school.

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Comments

Hah! Think that's something! Just check out how much athletic departments give to their schools, especially in the SEC.

Posted by: Woody | Feb 29, 2012 7:30:31 AM

I can't believe that people can argue honestly that ABA requirements are the primary driver of law school tuition increases after reading reports like this.

Posted by: Justin | Feb 29, 2012 1:01:44 PM