TaxProf Blog

Editor: Paul L. Caron
Pepperdine University School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

The 18 Most-Cited Tax Faculty

Brian Leiter (Chicago) has finalized his ranking of the Highest Impact Faculty in 13 Areas of Specialization, including tax, as measured by citations during the past five years (Jan. 1, 2005 - Jan. 15, 2010):

Rank

Tax Prof

Citations

Age

1

Michael Graetz (Yale)

370

66

2

Daniel Shaviro (NYU)

310

53

3

David Weisbach (Chicago)

300

47

4

Edward McCaffery (USC)

280

52

5

Reuven Avi-Yonah (Michigan)

260

53

 

Edward Zelinsky (Cardozo)

260

60

7

Lawrence Zelenak (Duke)

240

55

8

Joseph Bankman (Stanford)

230

55

9

Victor Fleischer (Colorado)

200

39

 

Leandra Lederman (Indiana)

200

44

 

Nancy Staudt (Northwestern)

200

47

12

Marjorie Kornhauser (Arizona St.)

190

63

13

Calvin Johnson (Texas)

180

66

 

Deborah Schenk (NYU)

180

63

15

David Schizer (Columbia)

170

42

16

Howard Abrams (Emory)

160

55

 

Anne Alstott (Harvard)

160

47

 

Thomas Griffith (USC)

160

61

Highly-cited scholars whose cites are not exclusively in this area:

  • Louis Kaplow (Harvard) (age 54), 970 citations
  • Kristin Hickman (Minnesota) (age 40), 230 citations
  • Mark Gergen (UC-Berkeley) (age 54), 210 citations
  • Kyle Logue (Michigan) (age 45), 180 citations

In our article, Pursuing a Tax LLM Degree: Where?, Jennifer M. Kowal (Loyola-L.A.), Katherine Pratt (Loyola-L.A.), Theodore P. Seto(Loyola-L.A.) and I used a variation of Leiter's methodology in conducting a citation count study of the faculty in the thirteen graduate tax programs ranked at least once in the U.S. News tax rankings over the past four years (pp. 28-29):

Rank

Graduate Tax Program Faculty

Citations

1

NYU

1917

2

Florida

1181

3

Georgetown

861

4

Miami

799

5

Northwestern

667

6

Boston University

614

7

Loyola-L.A.

475

8

San Diego

377

9

Villanova

177

10

SMU

139

11

Chapman

112

12

U. Washington

75

13

Denver

42

Prior TaxProf Blog coverage:

In our article, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83, 120-22 (2006), Bernie Black (Northwestern) and I examined the Top 25 tax faculty as measured by SSRN downloads, a practice I update monthly on TaxProf Blog.

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2010/05/the-18.html

Law School Rankings, Legal Education, Scholarship, Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c4eab53ef0133edd175af970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The 18 Most-Cited Tax Faculty:

Comments

I think this is an imperfect measure, but much more realistic than downloads, at a minimum you generally have to open a book or article in order to cite it

Posted by: mike livingston | May 18, 2010 6:25:21 AM

Is having your age displayed the price of "glory" I mean "vanity" I mean "Achievement" I mean "How many people can I get to cite me if I promise to cite them in a race to the bottom--I mean top of the charts"

Yes. Yes, it is.

Seriously, though, I think a stat on "years as a full-time prof" is likely more valuable than "age" and perhaps "average number of citations per year as a prof" is perhaps more important that gross cite counts.

I think you could pick up Moneyball and get some "real" statistics or measurement of worth other than gross cite count and age. Certainly the Moneyball guys would look at more than that to determine who is "really" valuable and who's stats just make them "look" valuable. But beware of the critical eye. The critical usually gets a lot of backlash, I mean criticism, itself.

Posted by: tax guy | May 18, 2010 7:47:21 PM