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Monday, May 10, 2010

Party Law School Rankings

SubtleDig has released the second annual Party Law School Rankings, which attempt to measure the "quality of life" of the Top 100 (102 with ties) law schools in the 2011 U.S. News Rankings.  Here are the Top 10 and Bottom 10 ("where fun goes to die") party law schools:

Party

School

Rank

 

 

School

U.S. News

Overall

Rank

1

Arizona

42

2

Tulane

48

3

Florida State

54

4

Arizona

38

5

UC-Berkeley

 7

6

Virginia

10

7

Michigan

9

8

Seattle

86

9

Hawaii

72

9

UNLV

78

11

Harvard

2

 

 

 

93

American

48

94

Houston

60

95

Case Western

56

95

Brooklyn

67

97

Chicago-Kent

80

98

Seton Hall

72

99

SMU

48

99

Rutgers-Newark

80

101

DePaul

98

102

Baylor

64

Other rankings include:

Here is the methodology used in the rankings:

  • Surveys (70%).  We spammed current law students with a “Please take our survey” email. Though we didn’t go to great lengths to conceal that the surveys were measuring quality of life, we didn’t advertise that they were for the Party Law School Rankings. We considered using the amount of responses per school as a factor in the rankings, as students with enough free time to answer such a frivolous email probably deserve recognition, but we were concerned about punishing schools for spam detection. If any school had a low response rate, we dispatched campus reps to directly collect survey answers. Every survey contained five questions from each of the four categories below (20 questions total.)
    • General Happiness Questions:  These questions attempted to gauge the respondent’s personal happiness level and the general campus happiness level. There seemed to be some correlation between job security and happiness, given the strong performance of many top schools.
    • General “Go Out” Questions:  These questions were divided between personal “going out” rates and general campus “going out” rates. Most respondents believed they went out more than their peers.
    • General Alcohol/Drug Consumption Questions:  Three questions on each survey were dedicated to alcohol consumption (both personal and campus-wide), and two questions were dedicated to drug consumption (both personal and campus-wide.)
    • General “Dateable” Questions:  These questions were the most diverse. One question was devoted to each of the following: attractiveness, douchebagginess, bitchiness, “just friends”-iness, and personal dating success.
  • Last Year's Rankings (2009) (20%):  We are fighting so that it won’t be forgotten, because to forget the past, to have no memory, is a danger to the rankings, because now that students are aware of these rankings, they are prone to submit fraudulent surveys.
  • Alcohol Access Value (10%).   Based on the amount of bars and liquor stores within a one-mile radius of the law school. This category benefited schools located in large metropolitan areas. 
Update: For more, see Above the Law.

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Comments

Isn't one problem with these rankings that the students at (say) Baylor have never been to Arizona, and vice-versa, and so have no way to know whether students are really happier or party more at the other law schools? It's a little bit like asking people who have been married for thirty years to rank their sex lives in comparison to other couples. How would they know?

Posted by: mike livingston | May 10, 2010 5:05:44 PM

no. it's like asking married couples around the country if they would define themselves as "happy" and then determining where married couples are happiest.

Posted by: john | May 11, 2010 1:27:33 PM

I'm not sure this is much better, but I definitely accept the correction.

Posted by: mike livingston | May 12, 2010 12:29:42 PM