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Wednesday, April 21, 2010

U.S. News Tax Rankings, 2008-2011

U.S. News Logo Following up on yesterday's post, New 2011 U.S. News Tax Rankings:  here are the overall and graduate tax rankings over the past four years:

Overall Tax Rankings (2008-2011):

Ave.

Rank

Tax

Program

2011

Rank

2010

Rank

2009

Rank

2008

Rank

1.00

NYU

1

1

1

1

2.25

Florida

3

2

2

2

2.50

Georgetown

2

2

3

3

4.00

Northwestern

4

4

4

4

5.75

Miami

5

6

6

6

6.00

Harvard

8

5

6

5

7.00

Boston University

6

6

8

8

7.00

UCLA

11

6

5

6

10.00

Virginia

10

11

9

10

10.75

San Diego

6

11

16

10

12.00

Michigan

16

9

10

13

12.25

Stanford

13

10

13

13

12.50

Texas

18

13

10

9

13.50

Loyola-L.A.

9

16

13

16

16.50

Columbia

13

13

19

21

17.75

Denver

12

19

19

21

18.00

SMU

14

19

22

17

Yale

19

10

10

U. Washington

19

15

18

Chicago

21

15

17

Penn

17

19

18

USC

16

22

21

Villanova

21

22

18

Duke

18

15

Boston College

18

23

Chapman

17

UC-Hastings

18

G. Washington

23

Graduate Tax Rankings (2008-2011):

Ave.

Rank

Grad Tax

Program

2011

Rank

2010

Rank

2009

Rank

2008

Rank

1.00

NYU

1

1

1

1

2.25

Florida

3

2

2

2

2.50

Georgetown

2

2

3

3

4.00

Northwestern

4

4

4

4

5.00

Miami

5

5

5

5

5.75

Boston University

6

5

6

6

7.25

San Diego

6

7

9

7

7.75

Loyola-L.A.

8

8

7

8

10.00

SMU

10

10

11

9

10.25

Denver

9

10

10

12

U. Washington

10

8

10

Villanova

11

11

10

Chapman

9


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Comments

To some extent, the rankings seem to fluctuate based on whether the professors asked to fill out the rankings think they are being asked to rank the top tax LLM programs (under the belief that a "program" can't exist or is not as good without a tax LLM degree and all of the extra course offerings and events) or whether they believe they are being asked to rank the top tax JD programs (under the belief that the LLM is not particularly relevant in that it provides very few extra adjunct offerings truly accessible to JD students, it often has the same or fewer events than top JD programs with tax colloquia and well-connected tax faculty, and that the LLM could be counterproductive for JD students vying for the attention of their professors with LLM students). Since the instructions haven't changed, it is likely a function of a presumably random change in the composition of the pool of people asked to rank the schools. It would be helpful if USNWR clarified this, since it seems people are trying to rank apples and oranges together.

For example, Miami, Villanova, Denver, SMU, Loyola (LA), San Diego, and USC (which announced it was doing an LLM, but then deferred the launch date at least a year, if not permanently) all improved this year and Harvard, UCLA, Michigan, Stanford, Texas, Penn, Chicago, and Yale (none of which have general tax LLM programs, although Harvard and Michigan have Int'l Tax LLMs and UCLA's general LLM allows students to concentrate in tax) all dropped. Some on both lists had faculty defections or additions, but most didn't change their faculty (or, presumably, their course offerings) at all.

Washington and Chapman are the only LLM schools to do worse. BC and GW were the only non-LLM schools to improve significantly, with Virginia improving by one spot too. All those schools, except Virginia, though, were near the bottom of the list and are likely influenced by just a few voters.

Posted by: Anon | Apr 21, 2010 9:36:37 AM