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Friday, November 6, 2009

Post Office Returns 107,831 Tax Refund Checks to IRS Due to Faulty Addresses

The IRS announced yesterday (IR-2009-101) that it has received 107,831 refund checks totaling $123.5 million (an average of $1,048) from the U.S. Postal Service due to mailing address errors.  The number of undeliverable refund checks is up 16% this year.  If you are awiting a refund check, you can update your address at Where's My Refund?

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Comments

Perhaps this was done intentionally. Several people I know have gotten their SS and State checks late this month. Delays can collect milion of dollars in interest for the government. Let's see if this becomes a habit. I think the government is in much bigger and more imminent money trouble than anyone realizes.

Posted by: Mike Adkison | Nov 6, 2009 9:41:50 AM

I used to send a receipt in the mail for all of my sales, in addition to the receipt in the box with the item. The purpose was so that if the UPS shipment got lost, the customer would get the mailed copy and know to follow up. But in the real world, UPS almost never loses or fails to deliver a parcel, but I would regularly get mailed receipts returned by the post office when they had been mailed to an address that UPS had just successfully delivered to.

I finally figured out that it's just a business decision on the part of the individual mail carrier: the price of a stamp is not enough to cover taking even a few seconds of their time for an even slightly out-of-ordinary delivery when they can whip out their "RETURN TO SENDER" rubber stamp faster.

Posted by: Tom | Nov 6, 2009 12:38:38 PM

Could it possibly be fraud on the part of the tax filer? Nooo! It could't be?

Posted by: jeanfield | Nov 6, 2009 8:09:30 PM

I'm a letter carrier in NJ. I can't tell you how many times I get letters for apartment complexes with no apt numbers. We're not mindreaders. All our routes have been added on to because of the PO's misfortunes. We don't have the time to go door-to-door searching for these recipients. And I've never heard of a UPS guy with a crystal ball either. Didn't happen.

Posted by: Gary | Nov 7, 2009 3:26:10 AM

But I bet the IRS would have no difficulty finding any of the 107,831 people for an audit.

Posted by: Stephen Macklin | Nov 7, 2009 5:02:19 AM