TaxProf Blog

Editor: Paul L. Caron
Pepperdine University School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Thursday, September 17, 2009

SSRN Tax Faculty Metropolitan Area Rankings

SSRN Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his rankings of the Top 10 Tax Faculties by Metropolitan Region, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 8/19/09):

 

 

All-Time Downloads

 

Recent Downloads

1

Los Angeles

38,967

Los Angeles

8351

2

Boston

37.906

New York

7422

3

New York

31.130

Ann Arbor/Detroit

7376

4

Ann Arbor/Detroit

27.848

Boston

6096

5

Chicago

18.014

Chicago

5512

6

Philadelphia

16.610

Champaign-Urbana

4366

7

Champaign-Urbana

15.724

Washington

4059

8

Washington

14.334

Davis, CA

3976

9

Denver

13.418

Connecticut

3109

10

Davis, CA

9474

Philadelphia

2843

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any full-time law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. Articles co-authored by members of a single faculty are counted only once towards that faculty’s tally.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2009/09/ssrn-tax-faculty-.html

Tax, Tax Faculty Metro Area Rankings | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c4eab53ef0120a5bc4f2f970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference SSRN Tax Faculty Metropolitan Area Rankings:

Comments

Isn't it interesting how often people's own schools and geographic areas do well in the surveys?

Posted by: mike livingston | Sep 17, 2009 3:48:59 AM