TaxProf Blog

Editor: Paul L. Caron
Pepperdine University School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings

SSRN Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has updated his ranking of the Top 25 U.S. Law School Tax Faculties, as measured by the number of SSRN downloads (through 8/19/09):

 

 

All-Time Downloads

 

Recent Downloads

1

Michigan

26,128

Michigan

6777

2

Harvard

23,955

Illinois

4366

3

Illinois

15,724

UC-Davis

3976

4

Pennsylvania

14,560

Harvard

3285

5

Colorado

13,418

Chicago

2708

6

Chicago

11,882

Loyola-L.A.

2669

7

USC

10,970

Pennsylvania

2381

8

Loyola-L.A.

10,839

Colorado

2377

9

UCLA

10,817

Washburn

2322

10

UC-Davis

9474

Baltimore

2266

11

Columbia

8653

Florida State

2126

12

Boston University

8516

UCLA

1997

13

Florida State

8501

USC

1939

14

Cincinnati

7711

Connecticut

1800

15

Chapman

6341

San Diego

1792

16

Stanford

6247

Chapman

1746

17

NYU

6000

Florida

1644

18

Florida

5518

Pace

1637

19

Washburn

5392

Columbia

1468

20

Baltimore

5164

Boston University

1467

21

Indiana-Bloomington

5012

Case Western

1372

22

Boston College

4638

Notre Dame

1346

23

Notre Dame

4608

Northwestern

1297

24

UC-Berkeley

4463

Texas Tech

1249

25

George Mason

4455

UC-Berkeley

1190

For purpose of Ted’s analysis, a tax professor is initially defined as any full-time law professor at a U.S. law school (1) self-identifying with one of the tax categories in the AALS faculty listing, (2) who has posted at least one tax or tax-related article in abstract or full text on SSRN. Paul Caron’s listing of new hires and lateral transfers is also reflected. Further corrections are made as requested. As is true of Paul Caron’s ranking of individual tax professors, downloads of all SSRN postings of any tax professor, so defined, are then tallied. Articles co-authored by members of a single faculty are counted only once towards that faculty’s tally.

For more on the use of SSRN downloads in law school rankings, see Bernard S. Black & Paul L. Caron, Ranking Law Schools: Using SSRN to Measure Scholarly Performance, 81 Ind. L.J. 83 (2006).

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2009/09/ssrn-tax-.html

Tax, Tax Faculty Rankings | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c4eab53ef0120a5638118970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference SSRN Tax Faculty Rankings:

Comments

Paul,

I wonder if you would share with your readers some of the work on the rather serious limits of SSRN downloads as a ranking system. For example, they tend vastly to exaggerate the significance of social science-oriented scholarship (as the name suggests) over other areas. In my experience they also discriminate heavily against women and minority faculty: of the top 40 or so "all time" top SSRN downloaders [in all subjects] virtually none were women, which seems counter to logic and persuasiveness. Finally and most obviously, the downloads say nothing about the quality of the article, or its later influence. There has been work on this cited on various blogs that your readers might be interested in (or reminded of).

Posted by: Michael A. Livingston | Sep 15, 2009 10:08:49 AM

As I have written before I am not a fan of SSRN rankings or those who draw inferences from them about quality or anything else other than the ability of SSRN to count. Still, except for the individual rankings it seems like these outcomes are dependent on the number of tax faculty at a school. How about taking two additional steps? Remove from the total non tax articles and then divide by the total number of tax faculty at that school.

Posted by: Jeff | Sep 18, 2009 6:07:10 AM