TaxProf Blog

Editor: Paul L. Caron
Pepperdine University School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Michigan Grad Files Complaint With ABA Over Wolverine Program's LSAT-Free Admissions Policy

Michigan David Boyle has filed this 24-page complaint with the ABA, alleging that Michigan's Wolverine Scholars Program for admitting Michigan undergrads with a minimum 3.80 GPA if they agree to not take the LSAT violates several law school accreditation standards.  The complaint has an extensive discussion of the coverage of these new LSAT-free law school admissions programs in the legal blogosphere.  For prior TaxProf Blog coverage, see:

Update:  Above the Law has more here.

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2009/07/michigan-grad.html

Law School Rankings, Legal Education | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c4eab53ef0115724992ca970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Michigan Grad Files Complaint With ABA Over Wolverine Program's LSAT-Free Admissions Policy:

Comments

Once again, confirmation that I am not anal-retentive enough to be a lawyer (though, strangely, I am a Michigan Law grad doing well in private practice - I can fake it, but this kind of "details of one's navel-lint-gazing" makes my eyes cross - dude, all lawyers out there, GET LIVES).

Posted by: MJ | Jul 30, 2009 10:38:13 AM

I am not sure what the LSAT proves other than you can study for the LSAT well. It's not linked to performance in law school or practice. Then again, the Bar Exam has nothing to do with anything either other than controlling the lawyer population, so I guess it would fit that model.

Posted by: Steve | Jul 30, 2009 10:55:36 AM

I wish they had this program in place when I was there.

B.A., 1995

Posted by: Keva Silversmith | Jul 30, 2009 11:21:02 AM

The whole thing is funny. Over the past decades I've known lawyers as dumb as a sack of hammers and I've known brilliant students who drop out or fail out of law school and I've known bright people who go to crappy law schools and become good lawyers and I've known bright people who go to great law schools and become crappy lawyers and . . .

To the extent that the LSAT provides some guidance as to how a student will handle the coursework in their first year it should be included. However, like so many other subjective things, good lawyering isn't that easy to predictd. I'd think that *any* variable that actually helped the prediction would be useful, but society being made of humans, who knows?

Posted by: JorgXMcKie | Jul 30, 2009 2:32:14 PM

I scored in the 99th percentile on the LSAT and had an extremely mediocre first year at a top 5 school with a 3.17 cumulative GPA.

My girlfriend scored far lower (comparatively) on the LSAT than I did, and she had a fantastic first year at the same law school finishing with a 3.87 GPA and grading on to the Law Review.

I'm not sure that the LSAT is a good indicator at all of first year success in law school.

Posted by: Anonymous | Jul 30, 2009 6:21:18 PM

"I am not sure what the LSAT proves other than you can study for the LSAT well."

You studied for the LSAT?

Posted by: elHombre | Jul 30, 2009 7:36:00 PM