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Wednesday, December 3, 2008

Repeat LSAT Takers Surge Following Rule Change Permitting Reporting of Only Highest Score

Following up on my prior post, ABA to Require Schools to Report Highest LSAT Scores from Multiple Tests, Rather Than Average Scores (6/14/06), Bill Henderson (Indiana) today reports that the predicted surge in students re-taking the LSAT has indeed occured: the number of repeat LSAT takers for the October 2008 test increased 16.8% nationally, and a staggering 33.7% in the Northeast -- at $127 per test, those 13,610 repeat test takers represent $1,728,470 to the LSAC.

Update:  The National Law Journal has more here.

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2008/12/repeat-lsat-takers-surge.html

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Comments

still cheaper than the gmat!

Posted by: | Dec 3, 2008 9:00:31 PM

Do repeat test takers at least have to identify themselves as such? There should be a difference between someone who scores a 170 on the first try and someone who takes 2 years to get there.

This system is bound to hurt minority students. With enough time and money, anyone can get an amazing score. And, minority students are far less likely than their white counterparts to have the time and money to keep taking the LSAT.

Posted by: | Dec 4, 2008 7:48:07 AM

There should be a difference between someone who scores a 170 on the first try and someone who takes 2 years to get there.

There is a difference. It's called "private schooling."

Posted by: edlebowski | Dec 4, 2008 10:58:54 AM