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Friday, December 10, 2004

Tax Profs Contribute to Reduction in Junior Faculty Ranks at Harvard

HarvardThe Harvard Crimson reports that Harvard Law School is looking for "new blood," caused in part by the failure to land and keep Tax Profs: 

  • Lily Batchelder (profiled here on TaxProf Blog) chose to join NYU rather than Harvard
  • Diane Ring (noted here on TaxProf Blog) left Harvard to accept a tenured position at Florida

According to the Harvard Crimson:

Last year, the Law School launched an effort to add 15 faculty members over a decade, and [Dean] Kagan said Saturday that she hopes to surpass that target. The Law School’s junior faculty on the tenure track dwindled to just five members last spring when two scholars jumped ship for tenured positions at Washington University in St. Louis and a third accepted a full professorship at University of Florida....

Last year, the school did not announce any new entry-level hires....A second offer was rebuffed when Lily L. Batchelder, a tax lawyer and former president of the Kennedy School Student Government, opted to join New York University’s faculty instead.

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» Harvard Blues - hiring of a conservative professor prompts lefties to go 'over the top' from Welcome to MassRight
HARVARD is addressing its academic diversity problem, and it deserves congratulations for that. But diversifying an institution is never easy. As is to be expected, some senior faculty are resisting the new blood. More here: "Goldsmith has been dogged ... [Read More]

Tracked on Dec 10, 2004 10:48:27 AM

Comments

If some faculties had their way, tax would be taught elsewhere in the university ("tax is not law" is something I've heard many times). When faculties are full of ABTers but there aren't any ABFLers or ABCLers or ABPLers the problem is evident. There are exceptions, and is it any wonder that young tax-faculty wannabes would be more attracted to NYU and Florida?

Posted by: Jim Maule | Dec 10, 2004 2:25:37 PM